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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

A.R. Alina, A.S. Babji and S. Affandi

The purpose of this paper is to improve the nutritional value of chicken nuggets by partial substitution of animal fat with palm stearin. Three nugget formulations with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the nutritional value of chicken nuggets by partial substitution of animal fat with palm stearin. Three nugget formulations with the fat level of 10.3 per cent palm fats consisted of blends from Olein: Stearin at ratios of 30:70, 50:50, 70:30 were used to replace chicken skin (control). Palm fat treatments resulted in a significant decrease of cholesterol content.

Design/methodology/approach

Four nugget formulations with the fat level of 10.3 per cent palm fats consisting of blends from Olein: Stearin at ratio of 30:70, 50:50, 70:30 and a commercial shortening, Socfat 36 are studied. The same formulation using chicken skin as a control and a commercial brand of nugget is used as a comparison. Proximate analysis of raw and cooked palm fat nuggets showed a decrease in the protein content and an increase of the fat content. The cholesterol content were reduced up to 45.9 per cent through the addition of palm fat, when compared against the control treatment. Fatty acid composition of palm fats in the palm substituted formulations increased the level of C16:0 and decreased C16:1, C18:1, C18:2, compared with fat from chicken skin.

Findings

The cholesterol content was reduced by 45.9 per cent when chicken skin and fat were substituted with palm fats. The texture of chicken nugget increased when added with palm fats. Palmitic acid (C16:0) content increased while palmitoleic acid (C16:1), oleic (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) decreased in palm fat treated nuggets.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in showing how palm stearin and olein usage in chicken nuggets helps reduce the product's cholesterol content.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

William Renzo Cortez-Vega, Irene Rodrigues Freitas, Sandriane Pizato and Carlos Prentice

The purpose of this study was to isolate Whitemouth croaker protein by alkaline solubilization process and evaluate their nutritional quality to evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to isolate Whitemouth croaker protein by alkaline solubilization process and evaluate their nutritional quality to evaluate the bioavailability of essential amino acids.

Design/methodology/approach

The proximate composition, essential amino acid composition, in vitro digestibility, apparent bioavailability, chemical score of amino acids and SDS-PAGE were determined for the isolated croaker proteins.

Findings

The isolated protein showed a high level of protein 92.21 percent and low amount of lipids 0.57 percent. The protein is rich in lysine and leucine, 108.73 and 96.75 mg/g protein, respectively. The protein isolate had high digestibility, 94.32 percent, which indicates proper utilization of this protein source, while the tryptophan had lower bioavailability (12.58 mg amino acid/mg protein). The high chemical scores were found for the amino acids lysine, methionine+cysteine (6.79 and 5.14). SDS-PAGE of proteins extracted showed appearance of the heavy chain of myosin (220 kDa), actin (50 kDa) and other fractions, with molecular weight between 20 and 50 kDa, such as troponin I, C and T.

Originality/value

The products obtained from croaker muscle can be incorporated as a high value supplements in human diets. The isolated protein exhibited a high content of essential amino acids and digestibility, indicating that the protein has a high nutritional quality.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional quality and the core factors used when evaluating the nutritional quality of menus are discussed. The empirical data were collected in 2008 by theme interviewing nine municipal food service employees. The data were analysed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that both positive and contributing factors emerged as follows: productisation of menu; using a plate model; length of a control period concerning the nutritional quality of the menu; checking the nutrition content when making changes in menus, dishes and food items; dealing with the results of the evaluation in the meetings; including the results in the service agreements; employers' positive attitude displayed towards software suppliers' training; including nutritional quality as a part of service quality; and implementing nutritional quality according to the job descriptions.

Practical implications

A variety of courses should be offered for the students concerning the guidance of food production by using software in professional kitchens; integrating working life into the curriculum; continuous training of the food service personnel; and cooperation with the professional kitchen's software suppliers. Moreover, further implications could involve, for example, developing and diffusing the national model for the nutritional quality follow‐up; and taking the Sinfos‐product information data bank into use.

Originality/value

Active updating of the software and training of the employees are needed in order to ensure the nutritional quality of menus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

William Renzo Cortez-Vega, Sandriane Pizato and Carlos Prentice

The purpose of this paper was to determine the nutritional quality of the surimi and kamaboko obtained from mechanically separated chicken meat and evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine the nutritional quality of the surimi and kamaboko obtained from mechanically separated chicken meat and evaluate the bioavailability of essential amino acids found in these products.

Design/methodology/approach

The mechanically separated chicken meat (MSCM) was characterized by the proximate composition, and the surimi and kamaboko were characterized by in vitro digestibility, determination of chemical score of amino acids and apparent bioavailability.

Findings

The MSCM contains 68.1 ± 0.5, 12.9 ± 0.24, 18.5 ± 0.28 and 0.6 ± 0.06 per cent moisture, protein, lipids and ash, respectively. The moisture of the MSCM (surimi) was 80.45 ± 0.15 per cent, and the protein was 10.04 ± 0.21 per cent. The highest digestibility was found for the kamaboko (92.27 per cent) which was heat-treated and the lowest was for surimi (90.82 per cent). Histidine is a limiting amino acid. In this study, the surimi showed 84.69 per cent and the kamaboko presented 81.31 per cent of the minimum requirement for adults. In relation to the apparent bioavailability, there was a decrease of surimi to kamaboko of 2.52 per cent of the limiting amino acid histidine. The surimi and the kamaboko presented 76.94 and 75 per cent of the minimum requirement for adults, respectively.

Originality/value

The application of the surimi technology in the production of a surimi-like material from mechanically deboned chicken meat provides a new approach toward increasing its value and utilization, e.g. for the development of meat-based products and analogs, as alternative protein sources, the surimi and the kamaboko exhibited a high content of essential amino acids, indicating that the protein has a relatively high nutritional quality.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Wolyna Pindi, Hin Wai Mah, Elisha Munsu and Noorakmar Ab Wahab

The purpose of this paper is to determine both the physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation of sausages made from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine both the physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation of sausages made from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) and the edible seaweed, Kappaphycus alvarezii (KA).

Design/methodology/approach

Four different sausage formulations were produced with different formulations containing 0(KA0), 2 (KA2), 4 (KA4) and 6 per cent (KA6) of KA.

Findings

Results have shown that the addition of KA increased the hardness and chewiness parameters, water holding capacity, redness (a*-value) and the pH value of the MDCM sausages (p<0.05). The adhesiveness, cohesiveness and springiness of all formulations showed no significant differences (p>0.05). The addition of KA reduced the cooking loss of MDCM sausages (p<0.05). However, the addition of KA made the sausages darker (lower L*-value) (p<0.05). Furthermore, the addition of KA aided in the reduction of lipid oxidation in the MDCM sausages when they were refrigerated at a temperature of 4°C for 12 days. The MDCM sausages that contained KA had lower two-thiobarbituric acid test values compared to the control sample (p<0.05) during the 12 days of storage at 4°C.

Originality/value

The addition of KA seaweed can potentially produce better quality MDCM sausages in terms of physicochemical properties and reduce the rate of lipid oxidation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Jamilah Syafawati Yaacob, Nur Asniyati Abdul Halim, Sharmilla Ashokhan, Hanisah Ali and Rashidi Othman

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pattern of carotenoids distribution in three underutilized Malaysian ‘ulam’ or traditional vegetables in Malaysia (Averrhoa

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pattern of carotenoids distribution in three underutilized Malaysian ‘ulam’ or traditional vegetables in Malaysia (Averrhoa carambola, Manihot esculenta and Ipomoea batatas) and their valuable pro-vitamin A activities. These assessments will yield valuable knowledge and insight into the importance of these underutilized traditional vegetables and highlight their potential for applications in medicinal and functional colorant industries.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors have evaluated the distribution of carotenoid compounds in aerial organs of three underutilized traditional vegetables (Averrhoa carambola, Manihot esculenta and Ipomoea batatas). The content of the individual carotenoids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the organ with the highest accumulation of these compounds were identified. Their valuable pro-vitamin A activities were also reported to indicate their medicinal potential which can further be exploited as pharmacologically active natural colorants and in other applications.

Findings

In total, three major chromatographic peaks corresponding to lutein, violaxanthin and β-carotene were observed through HPLC. Among the compounds detected, lutein and β-carotene were the most abundant carotenoids found in both shoots and petioles of all three species. Violaxanthin was only detected in I. batatas shoots. Overall, carotenoid content was observed to be higher in the shoots than in the petioles, where I. batatas contained the highest amount of total carotenoid, followed by M. esculenta and A. carambola. The opposite trend was observed in the petioles, where A. carambola petioles had the highest carotenoid content, while I. batatas contained the least.

Research limitations/implications

The distribution and abundance of these individual carotenoids suggested that the petioles contained the highest amount of carotenoid, contributing to its high pro-vitamin A activity, and could be potentially useful for medicinal application, as it can act as storage site that is not as prone to natural drying or degradation during harvest and sample storage. Future research work should include improvements in the extraction and purification procedures as well as robust identification methods which may lead to better detection and identification of other compounds that could attribute to its bioactivity, to complement the findings of the current study.

Practical implications

This analysis provides valuable information on the importance of underutilized traditional vegetables as important biofactories for sustainable production of valuable pigments (such as carotenoids) with medicinal benefits and can further be exploited in various industries, such as in formulation of functional natural colorants. This study also highlights the importance of petiole as a storage site of pharmacologically active compounds that is not as prone to natural drying or degradation during harvest and sample storage.

Originality/value

To date, there is no previous report found on comparative analysis of carotenoid content and quantification of individual carotenoid concentration in the edible aerial parts of Averrhoa carambola, Manihot esculenta and Ipomoea batatas, although they have been traditionally consumed as “ulam” in Malaysia. Therefore, the results reported in this study provide new insights on carotenoid accumulation in the selected ‘ulam’ species.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Heena Sharma, Sanjod K. Mendiratta, Ravi Kant Agrawal, Suman Talukder and Sudheer Kumar

Oxidative rancidity is a major problem in chicken meat because of its higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides this, microbial contamination is also one of…

Abstract

Purpose

Oxidative rancidity is a major problem in chicken meat because of its higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides this, microbial contamination is also one of the major problems of chicken meat which leads to deterioration in quality during storage. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate anti-microbial and anti-oxidant effects of various blends of essential oils (EOs) on the quality of emulsion-based (ready-to-eat) chicken sausages.

Design/methodology/approach

Sausages were incorporated with optimum level of four different blends of EOs containing six different EOs (Clove oil, Holybasil oil, Thyme oil, Cassia oil, Ajowan oil and Beetel oil), namely, Blend-1 (0.25 per cent), Blend-2 (0.25 per cent), Blend-3 (0.25 per cent) and Blend-4 (0.125 per cent); vacuum packaged and stored at −18±1°C for 60 days. Duplicate samples were taken for each parameter, and three trials were conducted for each experiment, total being six observations (n=6) for consistency of the results.

Findings

Significant decrease (p<0.05) in pH of control products was observed at each interval of storage period; however, in case of treatment products, significant decrease (p<0.05) was noticed from day 30 onwards. Blend-2 was observed with significantly lower (p<0.05) thio-barbituric acid reacting substances followed by Blend-1. Significantly lower (p<0.05) total phenolics content was observed in Blend-4 products as compared to other treatments. Regarding DPPH activity, control products showed significant decrease (p<0.05); however, in case of treatment products, DPPH activity showed significant (p<0.05) decrease after day 15 of storage. Microbial count increased with progressive storage period; however, the counts were well below the permissible limit of frozen meat products. All the blend incorporated products received very good sensory scores in consistent manner.

Practical implications

The work under this study would be very useful for the meat processing industries dealing with the perishable meat products. Use of natural anti-oxidants will also restore faith towards the consumers who are becoming more health conscious day by day.

Originality/value

The research work is original.

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

Yee Xing You, Suzana Shahar, Hasnah Haron, Hanis Mastura Yahya and Normah Che Din

Aging adults from low-income residential areas were found to have poor nutritional status and mental health based on National Health and Morbidity Survey Malaysia (2015)…

Abstract

Purpose

Aging adults from low-income residential areas were found to have poor nutritional status and mental health based on National Health and Morbidity Survey Malaysia (2015). Good nutrient intake contributes positively in averting these problems. Traditional Asian vegetables (ulam) are rich in polyphenols, antioxidants and fibres which could enhance nutritional status and mood state. This study intended to determine the relationship between habitual ulam intake and nutritional status, mood state and cognition among 252 aging Malaysian adults aged 45–80 years from the low-income residential areas in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

It was a cross-sectional study that used convenient sampling. Advertisement and invitation letters were sent to three selected community centres in Klang Valley prior to data collection. Informed consent was obtained prior to the collection of socio-demographic data. Anthropometric measurement was performed as per standard protocols. Validated surveys were conducted to obtain information on ulam consumption, mood state and cognitive status using validated food frequency questionnaires, Profile of Mood State and Mini-Mental State Examination questionnaires, respectively.

Findings

The average of ulam intake was 20.5 ± 2.5 g/day (½ serving daily). Habitual ulam intake was associated with lower waist circumference (R2 = 0.166, β = −0.216, p < 0.01), better MMSE scores (R2 = 0.337, β = 0.128, p < 0.05), less anger (R2 = 0.081, β = −0.116, p < 0.05), less tension (R2 = 0.139, β = −0.204, p < 0.01) and positive total mood disturbance (R2 = 0.095, β = 0.164, p < 0.05) after adjustment for gender, age, energy intake, total fruits and vegetables (non-ulam) consumption. The ulam intake at 100th percentile (=30g/day) associated to a better nutritional status, mood state and cognitive status in comparison to 25th percentile (<7.9 g/day) (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

Findings from this research would recommend people to consume not less than 1 serving of ulam everyday in order to have improved nutritional status, mood and cognition; nonetheless, future studies are required to clarify the causal mechanism concerning this relationship.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Simranjeet Kaur, Sunil Kumar and Z. F. Bhat

– The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of utilization of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the development of fiber-enriched chicken nuggets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of utilization of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the development of fiber-enriched chicken nuggets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed to incorporate and evaluate the effect of pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder on the quality characteristics of the chicken nuggets. The products were developed by incorporating different levels of pomegranate seed powder (1, 2, 3 per cent) and tomato powder (1, 2, 3 per cent) separately and were analyzed for various physicochemical and sensory parameters.

Findings

The pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder significantly (p < 0.05) increased the fiber content of the chicken nuggets besides improving various sensory attributes of the products. A significant (p < 0.05) effect of the pomegranate seed powder was observed on the pH, emulsion stability, cooking yield and proximate parameters of the chicken nuggets. Tomato powder also showed a significant (p < 0.05) effect on the emulsion stability, moisture and fat content of the products. No significant (p > 0.05) effect of tomato was observed on the pH and cooking yield of the products.

Originality/value

Fiber-enriched chicken nuggets could be developed by incorporating pomegranate seed powder and tomato powder in the formulation besides improving various sensory attributes of the products.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Nitin Mehta, B . D. Sharma, R. R. Kumar, Pavan Kumar, Om Prakash Malav and Akhilesh Kumar Verma

The purpose of this study is to develop a chicken product that could supply calcium, vitamin E and vitamin C together with high sensory acceptability. The present study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a chicken product that could supply calcium, vitamin E and vitamin C together with high sensory acceptability. The present study was envisaged to develop low-fat chicken patties fortified with calcium, vitamin E and vitamin C without any adverse effects on sensory attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different levels of calcium lactate as a source of calcium viz. 1.5, 1.75 and 2.0 per cent, α-tocopherol acetate for vitamin E at 0.019, 0.023 and 0.029 per cent and ascorbic acid for vitamin C at 0.09, 0.12 and 0.15 per cent in low-fat chicken meat patties were tried and the optimum level was standardized based on physico-chemical, proximate and sensory parameters.

Findings

The calcium lactate at 1.75 per cent, α-tocopherol acetate at 0.029 per cent and ascorbic acid at 0.15 per cent were found to be optimum on the basis of proximate, physico-chemical and sensory parameters. The textural attributes of the standardized product was comparable to that of the control. The a*, b* and Chroma values for the low-fat chicken patties fortified with calcium, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid were significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that of the control. The calcium and ascorbic acid concentration of the standardized product was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that of the control.

Originality/value

The levels in the fortified product were found to be suitable to achieve a 20 per cent RDA of calcium and almost a complete RDA for vitamin C. The research findings demonstrated the development of a single-designer chicken product rich in calcium, vitamin C and vitamin E.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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