Search results

1 – 10 of 50
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2003

David B. Audretsch and A.Roy Thurik

The purpose of this paper is to provide a link between entrepreneurial activity on the one hand, and industry evolution and economic growth on the other. The role that…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to provide a link between entrepreneurial activity on the one hand, and industry evolution and economic growth on the other. The role that entrepreneurship plays in innovative activity is explained. The link between entrepreneurship and industry evolution through the spillover of knowledge in generating entrepreneurial activity is analyzed. This implies that the relationship between entrepreneurship and growth is identified. In particular, this paper finds that entrepreneurship generates a positive pulse in the evolution of industries in such a way that fosters economic growth.

Details

Austrian Economics and Entrepreneurial Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-226-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Iman Cheratian, Antonio Golpe, Saleh Goltabar and Jesus Iglesias

During recent years, the nexus between unemployment and entrepreneurship has been examined in depth in developed and industrialised economies but rarely in developing…

Abstract

Purpose

During recent years, the nexus between unemployment and entrepreneurship has been examined in depth in developed and industrialised economies but rarely in developing economies. The purpose of this paper is to investigate such a relation in the case of 30 Iranian provinces from 2005Q2 to 2017Q4. Using both the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing and vector error correction method (VECM) Granger causality approaches, the findings show that a unidirectional short-run causal relationship from entrepreneurship to unemployment and vice versa was observed in 13 and 10 per cent of provinces, respectively. The authors also find evidence for unidirectional long-run causality in 77 per cent of provinces from unemployment to entrepreneurship, as well as 10 per cent of provinces from entrepreneurship to unemployment. Finally, the results confirm that in long-run, the “prosperity-pull” effects are considerably stronger than the “recession-push” effects in Iranian provinces.

Design/methodology/approach

The main target of this paper is to investigate the unemployment-entrepreneurship in the case of 30 Iranian provinces from 2005Q2 to 2017Q4 by using ARDL bounds testing and VECM Granger causality approaches.

Findings

The results confirm that in long-run, the “prosperity-pull” effects are considerably stronger than the “recession-push” effects in Iranian provinces. This finding reveals that the unemployment rate can be regarded as a critical instrument for hindering entrepreneurial activity by increasing the risk of business bankruptcy and pulling entrepreneurs out of self-employment. All these results must be taken into account in the construction of useful economic policies for the Iranian labour market.

Originality/value

The economic literature reveals that most empirical studies of the nexus between unemployment and entrepreneurship examined developed and industrialised economies and the analysis of such a relation for developing countries has not been considered by researchers. Thus, to fill this gap, this paper extends the current empirical literature by presenting new empirical evidence for the case of Iran, which has a developing economy.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Peterson K. Ozili

This study aims to investigate the relationship between financial inclusion and the business cycle.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between financial inclusion and the business cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Regression methodology is used to analyze the association between financial inclusion and the business cycle.

Findings

Using regression estimation, the findings reveal that the level of savings and the number of active formal account ownership are pro-cyclical with fluctuations in the business cycle. Also, savings by adults particularly for women and poor people declines during recessionary periods while the number of active formal account ownership declines for the adult population especially for women during recessionary periods. The findings also reveal that not all indicators of financial inclusion are pro-cyclical with fluctuating business cycles.

Practical implications

The implication of this observed pro-cyclical effect is that individuals and households will exit the formal financial sector during a recession, as banks become unwilling to lend money to individuals and households during bad times and this will lead to financial exclusion and vice versa. Policymakers seeking to increase the level of financial inclusion in their countries should focus on the timing of financial inclusion policies along the business cycle as the findings suggest that it might be more difficult to achieve financial inclusion objectives during recessions or periods of economic downturns.

Originality/value

The current debate on financial inclusion pays little attention to whether financial inclusion is pro-cyclical with the fluctuating business cycle. This study explores the association between financial inclusion and the business cycle.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Torben Eli Bager, Kim Klyver and Pia Schou Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the special interests of key decision makers in entrepreneurship policy formation at the national level. The core…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of the special interests of key decision makers in entrepreneurship policy formation at the national level. The core question is: what is the role that special interests play in a situation with significantly improved evidence through a growing number of high-quality international benchmark studies on entrepreneurial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic method is applied to analyse in depth the 2005 decision by the Danish Government to shift from a volume-oriented to a growth-oriented entrepreneurship policy. This decision process is an extreme case since Denmark has world-class evidence of its entrepreneurial performance.

Findings

Even in such a well-investigated country, which since 2000 has had a pioneering role in the development of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor study and international register-based studies, the special interests of a few top-level politicians and civil servants have significantly influenced the decision to shift the overall policy. These special interests guided the interpretation of the ambiguous evidence provided by these two benchmark studies.

Practical implications

Policy makers are made aware of the need to take a critical view on international benchmark studies, asking what is studied and how and realising that “the truth” about a country’s entrepreneurial performance cannot be found in just one study.

Originality/value

The theoretical value of this paper is its challenge to the widespread rationality view in the entrepreneurship policy field and a deepened understanding of how the pursuit of special interests is related to ambiguous evidence and system-level rationality.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2003

Abstract

Details

Austrian Economics and Entrepreneurial Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-226-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Yanling Peng and Rong Kong

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the economic relationship with recent changes in China’s land use policy and rural development through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the economic relationship with recent changes in China’s land use policy and rural development through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The first issue of economic importance is in understanding the market value of land use rights (LUR) transactions. To examine this, the authors build an argument around the idea of economic and marginal rents from Ricardo. The second issue relates to the extent by which deepening the rural financial landscape by allowing the mortgaging of LUR will promote and advance much needed entrepreneurial activity. To explore this issue, the authors draw on Schumpeter. The empirical contribution is based on a survey of 1,465 farm households in Gansu, Henan, Shaanxi and Shandong provinces.

Findings

In an endogenous Two-Stage Least Squares model, the authors find a positive and significant relationship between a willingness to mortgage LUR and entrepreneurship, which suggest that the new policy may well meet that objective. However, the authors do not find that entrepreneurs alone will have a willingness to mortgage LUR; non-entrepreneurs – traditional farmer types – would also be willing to mortgage LUR, but with a caveat that either group already has a disposition or demand for credit.

Originality/value

The value of the analysis is to provide an evidence to understand the market value of LUR transactions and to study the relationship between mortgage of LUR and entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 80 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Andrea M. Castillo

Abstract

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Roy Thurik and Sander Wennekers

Looks at the relationship between small business and entrepreneurship and also the differences between the two. Stresses that both are important separately and, in…

Abstract

Looks at the relationship between small business and entrepreneurship and also the differences between the two. Stresses that both are important separately and, in addition, notes where they overlap. Posits that in the early part of the last century small businesses were both vehicles for entrepreneurship and sources of employment and income but, although still important in the post‐war years, large firms made great inroads in the 1960s and 1970s. Concludes that government’s central role in entrepreneurialism for the economy is, by its very nature, enabling. Furthermore, entrepreneurship is acknowledged as a driver for economic growth, competitiveness and job creation.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Fu Lai Tony Yu and Diana S. Kwan

The purpose of this paper is to explain the miraculous rise of the mobile phone industry in China in particular and China’s impressive industrial growth in recent decades…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the miraculous rise of the mobile phone industry in China in particular and China’s impressive industrial growth in recent decades in general.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses qualitative or story-telling approach for empirical analysis. Specifically, it uses case studies to illustrate the authors’ arguments.

Findings

Utilizing the theory of imitative strategies of latecomer firms and I.M. Kirzner’s concept of entrepreneurial alertness, this paper argues that adaptive entrepreneurs in China’s phone industry survive by being alert to profit opportunities, flexible and adaptable to the changing environments. With limited resources and low technological capabilities at the beginning, Chinese phone makers conduct replication via reverse engineering. Through entrepreneurial learning and imitation, they are able to make indigenous or incremental innovation. The modified models with functions compatible to different groups of consumers and sold at low prices are able to penetrate the low-end markets in the Third World nations.

Practical implications

The authors’ explanation on the success of China’s mobile phone industry sheds light on broader China’s industrial growth as a result of economic reform.

Originality/value

Most studies on China’s mobile phone industry focus on technological analysis, without acknowledging the role of entrepreneurship. This study fills the gap.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Supporting and Sustaining Well-Being in the Workplace: Insights from a Developing Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-692-4

1 – 10 of 50