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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1909

It is a matter of common knowledge that beer, in its several varieties, is by no means the same thing to‐day as it was a generation or less ago; the progress of chemical…

Abstract

It is a matter of common knowledge that beer, in its several varieties, is by no means the same thing to‐day as it was a generation or less ago; the progress of chemical and biological knowledge on the one hand, and the keenness of competition on the other, have led to great alterations both in the materials used in its production and the methods by which it is produced. Exact or reliable knowledge about this, however, is far from being common; vehement assertions are made that all or almost all the changes are for the better, and also that beer is now a manufactured chemical product of deleterious nature, in which little or nothing of genuine material is used. Such statements are rendered unacceptable by the existence of self‐interest on one side and prejudice on the other. A short account of some of the facts concerned may, therefore, be of service.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

A.R.T. Williams, B.G. Dale, R.L. Visser and T. Van der Wiele

This paper explores the impact of the Internet on the business transactions of organisations. Three main impacts – globalisation, customisation, and customer demand…

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of the Internet on the business transactions of organisations. Three main impacts – globalisation, customisation, and customer demand solutions – are examined. It is argued that the medium and large old economy companies will be most affected by transactions within the new economy, and this leads to both problems and possibilities. The paper has identified three major ways in which these old economy companies are attempting to integrate the new economy as a development of their current business – treating the Net as an extension of their normal service, using the Net to expand and improve their current co‐makership relationship with suppliers, and a step‐back‐and‐reflect approach to assess how the Internet might affect their business.

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

A.R.T. Williams, B.G. Dale, R.L. Visser and T. Van der Wiele

This paper explores the impact of the Internet on the business transactions of organisations. Three main impacts – globalisation, customisation, and customer demands…

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of the Internet on the business transactions of organisations. Three main impacts – globalisation, customisation, and customer demands solutions are examined. It is argued that the medium and large old economy companies will be most affected by transactions within the new economy, and this leads to both problems and possibilities. The paper has identified three major ways in which these old economy companies are attempting to integrate the new economy as a development of their current business – treating the net as an extension of their normal service, using the net to expand and improve their current co‐makership relationship with suppliers, and a step‐back‐and‐reflect approach to assess how the Internet might affect their business.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

B.G. Dale, M. Zairi, A. Van der Wiele and A.R.T. Williams

This deliberately provocative paper challenges the replacement of quality and total quality management by the term “excellence” in the EFQM excellence model. It also…

Abstract

This deliberately provocative paper challenges the replacement of quality and total quality management by the term “excellence” in the EFQM excellence model. It also claims the current emphasis on “points scoring” is detracting from the fundamentals of quality management.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

B.G. Dale, A. van der Wiele and A.R.T. Williams

This paper explores, using five case histories, the reasons why organisations and their management remain immune to the need to improve the quality of their product and…

Abstract

This paper explores, using five case histories, the reasons why organisations and their management remain immune to the need to improve the quality of their product and service offerings. It is argued that the main reasons why a less than positive attitude to quality exists include: management are not familiar with the fundamentals of quality management; the cash rich nature of the business operation nullifies the need to make improvements; there are no strong external change agents for improvement; and competition is weak or non‐existent. The paper explores some potential countermeasures to this type of situation.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Giovanna Culot

The foundations of quality management have been laid throughout the history of civilization. Since the dawn of industrialization, as a consequence of an increasing…

Abstract

The foundations of quality management have been laid throughout the history of civilization. Since the dawn of industrialization, as a consequence of an increasing division of labor, the approach has evolved dramatically in terms of analytical tools and organizational practices. This evolution is outlined in this chapter. Starting from an overview of the different possible meanings of quality, the phases characterizing modern quality management (e.g., quality control, quality assurance, etc.) are described. Geopolitical and macroeconomic considerations are factored in to account for an uneven development across countries (e.g., Japan vs US). A general trajectory is traced as the scope of quality has constantly broadened to encompass not only the product, but also interorganizational processes and the impact on the environment and the society of the company activities. Against this backdrop, the current phase is seen as a polarization between a “classic” engineering approach and a more holistic view, questioning the same boundaries of the discipline.

Details

Quality Management: Tools, Methods, and Standards
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-804-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Winston G. Lewis, Kit Fai Pun and Terrence R.M. Lalla

This paper presents the main findings of an empirical study that investigates the effects of the “soft” and “hard” criteria of total quality management (TQM) in four ISO…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the main findings of an empirical study that investigates the effects of the “soft” and “hard” criteria of total quality management (TQM) in four ISO 9001 certified small and medium‐sized enterprises (SME) in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an ethnographic research approach, and used the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to determine the extent to which these criteria were implemented at the point of ISO 9001 certification. By complementing the literature review, a hierarchy framework of TQM implementation via ISO 9001 was developed. The framework comprised three levels of criteria, sub‐criteria and elements which determine the effectiveness of TQM implementation in SME. Inputs from 16 evaluators including senior executives and representatives from the studied companies were invited. The combined opinions from evaluators were used to identify and prioritize these criteria and components.

Findings

The results showed that the “soft” criteria were implemented less than the “hard” criteria in SME. The AHP findings supplement the body of knowledge existing in compliance requirements of ISO 9001 and provide insights on how SME perceive the importance of “soft” versus “hard” criteria in TQM implementation. These findings highlight the need to align SMEs' prevailing quality culture with top management and considers it as one of the focal compliance requirements for future revisions of the ISO 9001:2000 Standard.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the ethnographic nature of the study, it was possible to obtain data from only four SME.

Practical implications

SME in T&T may apply the findings of the empirical research to design, implement and continually improve their quality management system

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to the body of knowledge in the field of quality management in a region where such work is limited. It adds value by empirically measures TQM implementation by determining the extent to which its criteria is implemented in ISO 9001 certified SME.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Stephen Eldridge, Jos van Iwaarden, Ton van der Wiele and Roger Williams

This paper aims to explore the application of management control systems (MCS) to business processes when an organisation is operating in an uncertain environment. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the application of management control systems (MCS) to business processes when an organisation is operating in an uncertain environment. The limitations of conventional process control in this context are described, and the opportunities to exploit current MCS ideas are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

One such model, Simons' levers of control, is used for case study research in a European high technology start-up company.

Findings

The findings suggest that the organisation responded to its uncertain environment with a package of formal and informal control systems for its strategically important business processes. The relative importance of individual business processes was observed to positively influence the rigour of control systems' implementation. Also, the inherent uncertainty or unpredictability of an individual business process was observed to influence the type of control systems employed. The use of guiding or enabling systems, particularly interactive control systems, was more pronounced in those business processes which were inherently unpredictable.

Originality/value

These findings illustrate that adopting a MCS perspective to address business process control issues can yield new useful insights for managers when dealing with uncertainty.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Ismail Sila and Maling Ebrahimpour

There has been a plethora of published research related to total quality management (TQM) in the last few decades. However, very few studies focused on cataloging critical…

Abstract

There has been a plethora of published research related to total quality management (TQM) in the last few decades. However, very few studies focused on cataloging critical factors of TQM. One of the objectives of this literature review was to investigate the state of TQM by examining and listing various TQM factors identified based on survey studies conducted in different countries and published in a variety of journals over the past decade. An examination of 76 survey studies that used an integrated approach to TQM showed that the TQM factors could be grouped under 25 categories. An analysis of the 347 survey based research articles published between 1989 and 2000 using these 25 factors as a framework revealed the most frequently covered TQM factors in the literature. Another goal of the paper was to analyse the objectives of these articles by year and type of journal they were published in to determine the trends in TQM survey based studies and recommend future direction for research. The analysis showed that the objectives of the 347 studies could be grouped under six categories.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

B.G. Dale, R.T. Williams and T. van der Wiele

This paper makes the point that since the early 1990s there have been signs (e.g. the move from quality and total quality management (TQM) to excellence, and process…

Abstract

This paper makes the point that since the early 1990s there have been signs (e.g. the move from quality and total quality management (TQM) to excellence, and process control to process management) that quality and TQM are perceived by some commentators to be out‐of‐date and fallen by the wayside. The paper outlines these signs and points out that they can lead to a marginalisation of quality. However, through major trends such as business to business e‐commerce and six sigma there are clear indications that old style quality is coming back into the business arena because of the savings it can bring. These trends and their implications are examined in the paper.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

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