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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2015

J. Daniel Hammond

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to…

Abstract

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to whom the Essay was addressed; its interpretation by naturalists Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace; and its interpretation by modern commentators Kenneth Boulding and A. M. C. Waterman. The analysis helps explain how an essay that was written to defend social and economic institutions from critiques in utopian visions associated with the French Revolution came to be regarded as a model predicting overpopulation and exhaustion of natural resources.

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A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-857-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

A.M.C. Waterman

By “political economy” I mean both the method of thought and the body of knowledge which refer to human economising behaviour. The body of knowledge includes both theory …

Abstract

By “political economy” I mean both the method of thought and the body of knowledge which refer to human economising behaviour. The body of knowledge includes both theory — theorems, laws, empirical generalisations, etc., and “facts” — history, description of institution, statistical data, etc. By “Christian theology” I mean both the method of thought and the body of knowledge which refer to the human religious understanding of Jesus of Nazareth. “Religious” here implies awareness of, or belief in, God. The body of knowledge may include pre‐Christian religion (such as that reported in the Old Testament), and the results of independent inquiry (such as natural theology) in so far as these are interpreted by, or “refracted” through what theologians call the “Christ event”.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2006

A.M.C. Waterman

“Bob” Malthus, the Revd T. Robert Malthus (1766–1834), had only one son, Henry (“Hal”) who like his father became a clergyman and married, but died childless in 1882…

Abstract

“Bob” Malthus, the Revd T. Robert Malthus (1766–1834), had only one son, Henry (“Hal”) who like his father became a clergyman and married, but died childless in 1882. Malthus's older brother “Syd,” Sydenham II (1754–1821), inherited the family property in Albury, Surrey on the death of their father Daniel in 1800, and transmitted it to three more generations of descendents: Sydenham III (1806–1868), Sydenham IV (1831–1916), and the last Robert (1881–1972) who married but died childless.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-349-5

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A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-137-8

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Balbir S. Sihag

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origin of economics as a separate science.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origin of economics as a separate science.

Design/methodology/approach

A very comprehensive approach is presented for determining the origin of economics as a science. Three kinds of inter‐related issues are discussed: how to interpret and evaluate earlier, particularly ancient, writings, the specification of the requirements for declaring economics as a science and the definition, scope and methodology of economics.

Findings

Application of the most stringent requirements for declaring economics as a separate science to Kautilya's Arthashastra validated A.K. Sen's claim that it is the first book on economics.

Research limitations/implications

According to Kautilya, economics is a separate science but not independent of other disciplines and particularly of ethics. Whereas, most of the current research ignores this inter‐dependence and consequently does not fully capture reality.

Practical implications

It implies that the inter‐dependence between economics and other disciplines should be encouraged and vigorously explored.

Originality/value

It validates Redman's assertion, “The history of economics as a science is, in my view, still waiting to be properly written”.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

Fletcher Baragar

The emergence and maturation of the social sciences is an important component of the expansion of institutions of higher learning in the 20th century. The discipline of…

Abstract

The emergence and maturation of the social sciences is an important component of the expansion of institutions of higher learning in the 20th century. The discipline of Political Economy, increasingly institutionalized in various Canadian universities in the early decades of the century, secured a Chair at the University of Manitoba in 1909. After 1914, its title became “Political Economy and Political Science” and the department subsequently served “as the great mother department to which were attached newer social science disciplines until it was deemed appropriate to let them launch out on their own” (Pentland, 1977, p. 3). Political Science became independent in 1948, Geography in 1951, and Sociology and Anthropology in 1962 (p. 4). Agricultural Economics, which was taught in the Manitoba Agricultural College, became its own department when the college joined the university in 1924. In the 1930s, Agricultural Economics was absorbed into Department of Political Economy. However, according to Pentland (pp. 4–5) it was not until the late 1940s that agricultural economics became a significant “sub-department.” It subsequently separated itself from Political Economy and, in 1954, became an independent department in the Faculty of Agriculture (p. 5). The result of these disciplinary developments was that the faculty of the Department of Political Economy had, from time to time, members whose expertise lay outside the increasingly well-defined terrain of economics. Despite this, however, they did not seem to have any long-lasting direct impact on shaping and defining the curricula in Economics. Since these other disciplines left and became independent when they had reached a certain size or degree of influence, Economics was left to define and pursue its own agenda unencumbered by the needs of these former associates.

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Wisconsin "Government and Business" and the History of Heterodox Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-090-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Paul Oslington

Abstract

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

A.M.C. Waterman

Abstract

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Rick Wicks

This paper revisits old questions of the proper subject and bounds of economics: does economics study “provisioning”? or markets? or a method of reasoning, self‐interested…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper revisits old questions of the proper subject and bounds of economics: does economics study “provisioning”? or markets? or a method of reasoning, self‐interested rational optimization?

Design/methodology/approach

A variety of scholars and others in many fields make use of a taxonomy of society consisting of three “spheres”: markets, governments, and communities. It is argued here that this tripartite taxonomy of society is fundamental and exhaustive. A variety of ways of understanding this taxonomy are explored, especially Fiske's (1991, 2004) “Relational models theory.” Then – after communities and their products, social goods, are defined more thoroughly – a visual model of interactions among the three spheres is presented.

Findings

The model is first used briefly to understand the historical development of markets. The model is then applied to understanding how economic thinking and market ideology, including the notion of social capital, can be destructive of communities and their production of social goods (and their production of social capital as well).

Research limitations/implications

It is not possible to measure these effects monetarily, so calculating precisely “how this affects results” in a standard economic model is impossible.

Practical implications

Nevertheless we could better prepare students for real‐world analysis, and better serve our clients, including the public, if – whenever relevant, such as in textbook introductions and in benefit/cost analyses – we made them aware of the limitations of economic analysis with respect to communities and social goods.

Originality/value

The three‐spheres model offered here, based on Fiske's “Relational models theory,” facilitates this awareness.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Ataul Huq

Development implying change or progress has now been recognized as a multi‐dimensional concept. But development measured simplistically in terms of certain quantifiable…

Abstract

Development implying change or progress has now been recognized as a multi‐dimensional concept. But development measured simplistically in terms of certain quantifiable variables such as gross or percapita real GNP was once considered as the be all and end all of the challenges facing the human beings in terms of hunger, poverty, malnutrition and squalid conditions (Aiken & Follette, 1977; Allen & Thomas, 1990). This preoccupation by development theorists, social thinkers, statesmen and philosophers of the past led to the discovery of a magical word, i.e. creation of wealth as a solution to all those human challenges (Ball, 1992). The goal of wealth‐creation as a measure of unidimensional concept of development, in turn, is said to have been achieved by production for profit alone. Again, the production for profit could be pursued only by those producers who would be guided by self‐interested motives of maximizing output and minimizing costs.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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