Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1934

R.B. Beisel, A.L. MacClain and F.M. Thomas

THE trend of design in the modern aeroplane has been toward improved performance realised through external cleanness. It is apparent that the number of essential units…

Abstract

THE trend of design in the modern aeroplane has been toward improved performance realised through external cleanness. It is apparent that the number of essential units comprising a modern aeroplane is nearly a minimum at the present stage of the art, and it appears also that the possibilities of further striking reductions in the drag of these units, due to change in form or shape either individually or in combination, are not great.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1934

R.B. Beisel, A.L. MacClain and F.M. Thomas

(7) Separate Openings in the Skirt.—A number of equally spaced rectangular openings were cut in the skirt. Openings of this sort could be closed by a rotating shutter…

Abstract

(7) Separate Openings in the Skirt.—A number of equally spaced rectangular openings were cut in the skirt. Openings of this sort could be closed by a rotating shutter. Separate openings of this type were found to be less effective in producing flow and considerably less efficient. Such openings might be closed by doors opening in the manner of flaps. This last arrangement is somewhat less effective than trailing‐edge flaps and also less efficient. Nevertheless, doors of this type may be made to produce large increases in flow. Tests with varying number and sizes of doors disclosed that, if the doors are placed too far apart, good cooling will be obtained for cylinders immediately in front of the doors, but the cooling of the other cylinders will be much less. Therefore, two or three doors are likely to be insufficient, and the use of four or more is preferable.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 6 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1935

The writer of “Seaplane Design” is to be congratulated on the industry and care with which he has consulted the published literature on his subject. He gives a full…

Abstract

The writer of “Seaplane Design” is to be congratulated on the industry and care with which he has consulted the published literature on his subject. He gives a full account of most of the recent work, both experimental and theoretical, which has been done in the United States and Germany. Unfortunately, he has not taken into account the still more recent work published in this country, possibly because his book was prepared some time ago. Research work on seaplanes, both model and full scale, is advancing so rapidly that in some respects a book on seaplane design is almost out‐of‐date before it is published.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1943

Alexander Klemin

THE eleventh annual meeting of the Institute was for the first time held simultaneously in three centres—in New York City at Columbia University, in Detroit at Rackham…

Abstract

THE eleventh annual meeting of the Institute was for the first time held simultaneously in three centres—in New York City at Columbia University, in Detroit at Rackham Educational Memorial, and in Los Angeles at the University of Southern California—from January 25 to 29. The purpose of the three simultaneous meetings was to minimize travel by executives and engineers from important war jobs in the present emergency. The same programme was offered at all three centres, papers being sometimes presented by proxies—experts in the same field as far as possible. In spite of the fact that attendance was divided between three centres, there was splendid representation at each place and a wide range of subjects was covered in the many papers. Naturally these were restricted more to analysis, and technology and information as to the latest design or production features of current aircraft or engines was withheld. The same ban applied to striking developments in accessories, instruments and armaments. All papers had to be approved by the Army or Navy and to be read substantially as written. While off‐the‐record discussions were permitted, these discussions were not made public. In particular there was a ban on comparisons between foreign and American materials, equipment or methods. The formula for control of comparison performance stated that the manufacturer's smooth curve calibrations and performance figures might be quoted, but no Wright field performance figures or data could be revealed. In spite of such restrictions a tremendous amount of valuable technical information was presented to the assembled engineers.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1939

Ice‐removing apparatus for aircraft including a covering comprising a layer of extensible dielectric material adapted to be extensively stretched in the operation of said…

Abstract

Ice‐removing apparatus for aircraft including a covering comprising a layer of extensible dielectric material adapted to be extensively stretched in the operation of said apparatus, and an extensible layer of material at the surface of the dielectric material of relatively great conductivity adapted to be stretched therewith and to be electrically conductive in a condition of stretch.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 11 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1935

J.M. Shoemaker, T.B. Rhines and H.H. Sargent

THE remarkable strides made by designers of commercial and military aircraft during recent years have been most strikingly evidenced by the ever‐increasing performance of…

Abstract

THE remarkable strides made by designers of commercial and military aircraft during recent years have been most strikingly evidenced by the ever‐increasing performance of their products. This progress has been gained, to a great extent, in two ways: by improving the aerodynamic cleanness of the aeroplane and by increasing the specific power output of the engine. However, the successful utilisation of both methods has been complicated by the difficulty of providing the higher‐powered engines with proper cooling and accessibility while retaining the cleanness of the aeroplane. Each addition to the power‐plant output has not only further complicated that unit and made necessary more controls and accessories, but has also made the engine harder to cool. Designing the cowl to favour the cleanness of the aeroplane has often proved to be detrimental to both proper cooling and accessibility.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 6 of 6