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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

A.I. ADAMSONE and B.S. POLSKY

A half‐implicit absolutely stable method for 3D simulation of the transient processes in semiconductor devices is proposed. The calculations of transient processes in…

Abstract

A half‐implicit absolutely stable method for 3D simulation of the transient processes in semiconductor devices is proposed. The calculations of transient processes in bipolar transistor were carried out and were compared with the results of 2D simulation.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

E.D. LYUMKIS, B.S. POLSKY, A.I. SHUR and P. VISOCKY

An efficient numerical method for the solution of hot‐carrier transport equations describing transient processes in submicrometer semiconductor devices is proposed. The…

Abstract

An efficient numerical method for the solution of hot‐carrier transport equations describing transient processes in submicrometer semiconductor devices is proposed. The calculations of transient processes in submicrometer MOS transistor were carried out and compared with the results obtained by conventional drift‐diffusion model.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2019

Luisa Errichiello and Tommasina Pianese

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main features of smart work centers (SWCs) and show how these innovative offices would support the implementation of smart…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main features of smart work centers (SWCs) and show how these innovative offices would support the implementation of smart working and related changes in workspaces (“bricks”), technologies (“bytes”) and organizational practices (“behaviors”).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, scientific literature is combined with white papers and business reports and visits to 14 workplaces, including offices designed as SWCs, co-working spaces, one telecenter, one accelerator and one fab lab. Primary data were collected through interviews with managers and users and non-participant observation, whereas secondary data included web-sites, brochures, presentations, press releases and official documents.

Findings

The authors developed research propositions about how the design of spaces and the availability of technology within SWCs would support the “bricks” and “bytes” levers of smart working. More importantly, the authors assumed that this new type of workplace would sustain changes in employees’ behaviors and managers’ practices, thus helping to overcome several challenges traditionally associated with remote working.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory nature of the research only provides preliminary information about the role of SWCs within smart working programs. Additional qualitative and quantitative empirical investigation is required.

Practical implications

This study provides valuable knowledge about how the design of corporate offices can be leveraged to sustain the implementation of smart working.

Originality/value

This study advances knowledge on workplaces by focusing on an innovative design of traditional offices (SWC). It also lays the foundations for future investigation aimed at testing the developed propositions.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Michal Misiak, Daniel Kruger, Jessica Sloan Kruger and Piotr Sorokowski

People consider food wasting behavior to be immoral. However, it is not clear whether people who consider food wasting behavior immoral waste less food. Building on…

Abstract

Purpose

People consider food wasting behavior to be immoral. However, it is not clear whether people who consider food wasting behavior immoral waste less food. Building on previous qualitative studies, we conducted a large-sample quantitative study. We examined whether people who consider food wasting behavior immoral display food wasting behaviors less frequently and whether they waste less food in general. Furthermore, we explored the reasons that make people consider food wasting behavior immoral and whether they affected food wasting.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants voluntarily (n = 562) completed a set of questionnaires that measured the frequency of their food wasting behavior, the amount of food wasted in the preceding week, and food wasting moral judgments, including scales, which explored the reasons for judging this behavior as immoral.

Findings

We found that people who regard food wasting behavior as immoral displayed food wasting behavior less frequently, but did not waste less food than people who did not consider food wasting behavior immoral. Furthermore, we found that there are two categories of reasons for moral disapproval of food wasting behavior: externally oriented (concern for the environment, social issues, and for future generations) and internally oriented (concern for ones’ financial situation, social approval, and going by traditional norms). However, only people whose moral judgments were motivated by externally oriented reasons wasted food less frequently.

Originality/value

Our findings provide evidence that moral judgments influence food wasting behavior and highlight the importance of the content of moral beliefs for predicting behaviors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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