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A.H. Yates

The British Gliding Association lias rightly called attention to the need for an artificial horizon suitable for use in a sailplane. This note argues that the artificial…

Abstract

The British Gliding Association lias rightly called attention to the need for an artificial horizon suitable for use in a sailplane. This note argues that the artificial horizon, together with the directional gyro, form the ideal pair of instruments for the accurate and safe Hying of sailplanes in clouds. A description is given of a pair developed from German instruments together with full details of their weight, size and current consumption. It is shown that for a total weight of 20 lb. a sailplane can he fitted with an electrically driven horizon and directional gyro which will run continuously for over six hours before the batteries need recharging.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

A.H. Yates

A NOVEL method of plotting a function of two independent variables has recently come into use in aeronautics and a description of it may be of interest to workers in this…

Abstract

A NOVEL method of plotting a function of two independent variables has recently come into use in aeronautics and a description of it may be of interest to workers in this and other fields of experiment. The idea was originated by Mr. R. F. Sargent of the National Physical Laboratory and has since been extensively used in this country and in America. The idea can be extended to include plotting a function of three independent variables in the form of a ‘lattice’.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

A.H. Yates

FORTY years ago the pilots of the earliest aeroplanes were embarrassed by the very restricted speed range of their aircraft. Often the maximum level speed obtainable was a

Abstract

FORTY years ago the pilots of the earliest aeroplanes were embarrassed by the very restricted speed range of their aircraft. Often the maximum level speed obtainable was a mere ten miles per hour above the stalling speed. As the art progressed the aerodynamicist and the power plant designer joined forces to raise the top speed while the invention of flaps and slots helped to offset the effects of increasing wing loading and kept the stalling speed to a reasonable value. For many years our pilots have enjoyed a comfortable speed range of several hundreds of miles per hour which even the increased stalling speed in steep turns has not seriously reduced. In the last few years, however, the pilots of the latest high speed, high flying fighters and bombers are worried by finding that the speed range of their aircraft is again becoming constrained, not only by the familiar boundaries of the stall and the maximum available speed, but by new and more fearful boundaries. What is the cause of the return of this aeronautical claustrophobia?

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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ANOTHER Annual Meeting has come and gone. It was scarcely to be expected that the meeting at Bradford would be a record in the number of members attending, seeing that it…

Abstract

ANOTHER Annual Meeting has come and gone. It was scarcely to be expected that the meeting at Bradford would be a record in the number of members attending, seeing that it is only three years ago since the Association met in the neighbouring city of Leeds, and that Bradford cannot boast either the historical associations or the architectural and scenic setting of many other towns. For the most part therefore the members who did attend, attended because they were interested in the serious rather than the entertainment or excursion side of the gathering, which was so far perhaps to the advantage of the meetings and discussions. Nevertheless, the actual number of those present—about two hundred—was quite satisfactory, and none, we are assured, even if the local functions were the main or an equal element of attraction, could possibly have regretted their visit to the metropolis of the worsted trade. Fortunately the weather was all that could be desired, and under the bright sunshine Bradford looked its best, many members, who expected doubtless to find a grey, depressing city of factories, being pleasingly disappointed with the fine views and width of open and green country quite close at hand.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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PERHAPS there is no library topic more interesting both to librarians and to the public whom they serve than the ethical influence of the fiction which forms such a large…

Abstract

PERHAPS there is no library topic more interesting both to librarians and to the public whom they serve than the ethical influence of the fiction which forms such a large percentage of the circulation of the average Public Library. Opinions will probably always differ widely as to whether individual novels are moral or immoral, and yet it should be possible to establish some criteria of morality in fiction to which the majority of us would be willing to consent.

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New Library World, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

A.H. Yates

THE problem of designing an aircraft so that the pilot is able easily to regain and maintain control following the sudden failure of an engine has been for some years a

Abstract

THE problem of designing an aircraft so that the pilot is able easily to regain and maintain control following the sudden failure of an engine has been for some years a serious one. It is thought that an elementary description of the aerodynamics of the problem and of the flight tests which are made to assess a particular aircraft may be of interest. The equally important problem of ensuring adequate performance after an engine failure is not discussed here.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

G. John

A SERIES of laborious calculations of take‐off distance indicated the desirability of expressing propeller thrust as a function of speed in the take‐off range so that the…

Abstract

A SERIES of laborious calculations of take‐off distance indicated the desirability of expressing propeller thrust as a function of speed in the take‐off range so that the ground run could be integrated directly. Propeller thrusts were estimated from REF. 2 for a wide range of disk loadings, solidities, and tip speeds. Plotting against speed shows that, for practical values, the assumption of linearity introduces a negligible error (see FIGS. 7–39).

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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SOCIALLY, the two conferences can only be described as a huge success. The local arrangements for the entertainment of delegates were complete, and the receptions…

Abstract

SOCIALLY, the two conferences can only be described as a huge success. The local arrangements for the entertainment of delegates were complete, and the receptions, banquets and excursions gave great pleasure to all who took part in them. To most of the English‐speaking delegates the trip to Brussels possessed the additional charm of novelty, and thus the week's proceedings assumed a holiday character. Save those who were suffering from mislaid baggage, and blistered feet caused by the trottoirs économiques de Bruxelles, a general note of gaiety prevailed, particularly among the British and Canadian representatives. Most of the American delegates were ladies, and they were all looking more or less tired, or were tormented by the thought of lost Saratoga trunks, which gave them a serious and detached appearance. The absence of attentive male librarians may also have contributed to the gloomy aspect which so many of them wore. Is it possible that the overwhelming feminine note in American librarianship is the key to the many discrepancies in library policy and work which have been observed by different writers? However that may be, it was distinctly noticeable that in comparison with their English, Dutch, Swedish and Belgian sisters, the American lady librarians were a tired and unhappy company. There were one or two noble exceptions, but the memory of these we prefer to hug in secret as a precious treasure.

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New Library World, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were…

Abstract

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were, the dog to be operated upon would probably prefer a gala day at his Tyburn Tree to being executed in an obscure back yard.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

PROPERLY administrated, the reading room—displaying newspapers, magazines, and ready‐reference books—may, in spite of all that has been said to the contrary, become an

Abstract

PROPERLY administrated, the reading room—displaying newspapers, magazines, and ready‐reference books—may, in spite of all that has been said to the contrary, become an important contributory factor in the educational work of our libraries. Let us examine the position closely. It is admitted, even by intemperate opponents, that the reading room is one of our most frequented departments. How, then, may the librarian make it of real educational value to the frequenters? This is a significant question, and, in the limited space available, we propose to indicate a few directions in which much might be done to enhance the utility of this department, and, within certain limits, to systematize its work on the lines of the policy governing the circulating departments. First of all, there is the important question of planning the room; and, although the size and arrangement must, to a large extent, depend upon the local requirements, a few general observations, applicable under almost all circumstances, may here be made. The room should be so designed as to facilitate supervision—glass partitions being more desirable than solid walls. Wherever practicable, the exit should be within view of the staff. For passages between tables, ample space should be allowed—six to eight feet being a reasonable width where movable chairs are used. The accompanying plan obviates the necessity for further comment, and will, perhaps, convey a clearer idea of what is required.

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New Library World, vol. 12 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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