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Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article

Stuart E. Jackson

Most investors and business leaders understand that the internet has created a few high‐profile success but many more start‐up businesses that have destroyed rather than

Abstract

Purpose

Most investors and business leaders understand that the internet has created a few high‐profile success but many more start‐up businesses that have destroyed rather than created value. As a result, many executives have dampened expectations for the transformational potential of internet‐based commerce, and have cut back investments accordingly. In this column, Stuart Jackson makes the observation that while many internet start‐ups have crashed, most of the biggest e‐commerce successes have come from established companies with a loyal base of customers who have added internet capabilities to supplement traditional channels. Traditional retailers and B2B businesses who have yet to grasp the full potential of the internet have untapped opportunities to create what might be called “net shareholder value” by using the Internet to supplement existing channels. The author proposes four key strategies for companies considering going down this path.

Design/methodology/approach

In this article, Jackson considers a number of the assumptions that were used to justify massive (and in many cases, outlandish) valuations of Internet businesses in the late 1990s. Jackson then evaluates the extent to which each of these has been proven true in the light of recent history. The author then draws lessons that can be applied broadly across any business considering e‐commerce strategies to supplement existing channels to market.

Findings

Companies should not think of e‐commerce as a separate business from traditional channels. E‐commerce and off‐line businesses selling the same products are competing in the same strategic market segment. Competitive advantage will go to those who can achieve overall scale benefits (taking account of customer acquisition costs as well as physical infrastructure and operating overheads) superior to the competition. In most situations, the best way to achieve this will be through an integrated offering leveraging multiple channels.

Originality/value

By looking in detail at e‐commerce successes and failures and the reasons behind those, this article provides valuable lessons for companies in how to increase competitive advantage and create shareholder value by leveraging the Internet for their business.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part

Tom Bellairs, Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben and Matthew R. Leon

Sudden crises, known as environmental jolts, can cripple unprepared organizations. In recent years, financial jolts have led many organizations, particularly government…

Abstract

Sudden crises, known as environmental jolts, can cripple unprepared organizations. In recent years, financial jolts have led many organizations, particularly government organizations, to respond by furloughing employees. Furloughs can engender various responses in employees that can lead to negative work outcomes for both the employees and the organization. Previous research shows that the implementation of strategic human resource management (SHRM) practices, such as commitment-based systems, can mitigate the negative effects of environmental jolts. Utilizing the knowledge-based view and affective events theory, we propose a multilevel model where SHRM practices moderate employee affective responses to furloughs, which, in turn, drive subsequent employee behavioral outcomes.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-824-2

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Book part

Susan E. Jackson, Chih-Hsun Chuang, Erika E. Harden and Yuan Jiang

Building on the resource-based view of the firm and complex systems theory, we argue that the effective utilization of knowledge-intensive teamwork (KITwork) can be a

Abstract

Building on the resource-based view of the firm and complex systems theory, we argue that the effective utilization of knowledge-intensive teamwork (KITwork) can be a source of sustained competitive advantage for firms that pursue a variety of strategies and compete in a variety of industries. KITwork is a multi-dimensional, multi-level social process that promotes knowledge flows within and between organizations. Through KITwork, the knowledge resources of individual employees are transformed into a capability that contributes to the effectiveness of knowledge-based organizations. After introducing and explaining the concept of KITwork, we explore the challenges that organizations must address in order to design HRM systems that support and facilitate KITwork.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-426-3

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Book part

Chau Vu

This chapter explored how authenticity and objectivity in autoethnography research are viewed from a new materialist perspective. The study is framed within Barad’s (2007…

Abstract

This chapter explored how authenticity and objectivity in autoethnography research are viewed from a new materialist perspective. The study is framed within Barad’s (2007) concept of agential realism, which reconceptualizes how objects are examined, and knowledge created in scientific activities. The findings showed that in terms of authenticity, new materialism suggests a non-representationalist voice, which argues against the need to exactly mirror pre-existing phenomena in some metaphysical world through language in traditional research paradigms. This means the researchers must give up the authority of their narrative voice as a privileged source of knowledge with a valued property of authenticity. The study suggests performative voice as an alternative. The performative narrator is concerned not with identifying who researchers are, and how they are similar or different from the Other, but how their experiences constrain what they know and how they represent participants or themselves in their worlds. Writing autoethnographies now is less a way of telling than a way of knowing in being. An agential-realist account of objectivity posits that “distance is not a prerequisite for objectivity, and even the notion of proximity takes separation too literally” (Barad, 2007, p. 359). So objectivity does not mean to be removed or distanced from what we, as individual subjects of cognition, are observing. Objectivity, instead, is embodied through specific material practices enacted between the subject and the object. This entails that “objectivity is about accountability and responsibility to what is real” (Barad, 2007, p. 91). This understanding of objectivity engenders a reconfiguring of data as diffractive phenomena and reliability as axiological intra-actions in what I now call an auto-ethico-ethnography.

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

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Article

Edmund Davies, L.J. Widgery and Frederic Sellers

March 24, 1970 Damages — Personal injuries — Assessment — Brucellosis — Contracted from drinking infected milk — Depression and psychological inertia in addition to…

Abstract

March 24, 1970 Damages — Personal injuries — Assessment — Brucellosis — Contracted from drinking infected milk — Depression and psychological inertia in addition to physical symptoms — Award of special damages for loss of earnings too high — Award of general damages for pain and suffering too low — Global award a fair and proper sum — Whether Court of Appeal will interfere — Observations as to proper approach when considering appeals on quantum.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part

Richard L. Moreland

I present and evaluate various explanations for why new workers who were sponsored by oldtimers tend to have better job outcomes (better performance, more satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

I present and evaluate various explanations for why new workers who were sponsored by oldtimers tend to have better job outcomes (better performance, more satisfaction, and less turnover) than do new workers who were not sponsored.

Methodology/approach

My evaluations involve searching for evidence that fits (or does not fit) each of the explanations.

Findings

The two most popular explanations argue that the job benefits of sponsorship arise because (a) sponsored newcomers have more realistic job expectations than do unsponsored newcomers, or (b) the quality of sponsored newcomers is greater than that of unsponsored newcomers. Unfortunately, these explanations have weak empirical support. A third explanation, largely untested as yet, attributes the performance benefits of sponsorship to social pressures that can arise when someone is sponsored for a job. These pressures include efforts by newcomers to repay the people who sponsored them, efforts by sponsors to assist the newcomers they sponsored after those persons have been hired, and stereotypes among coworkers about the kinds of people who get jobs through sponsors. Although limited as yet, the evidence regarding this new explanation seems promising.

Research implications

More research on this third explanation for sponsorship effects should be done. Suggestions for how to do such research are reviewed and a relevant experiment is presented.

Social implications

The ideas and evidence presented here could help employers who want to improve the job outcomes of their new workers. Poor outcomes among such persons are a major problem in many settings.

Originality/value

Although some of my ideas have been mentioned by others, they were not been described in much detail, nor were they tested. My hope is that this chapter will promote new theory and research on the performance benefits of sponsorship, a topic that has been largely ignored in recent years.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-076-0

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Article

Randall Schuler and Susan E. Jackson

The purpose of the paper is to describe how the understanding of the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and organizational effectiveness (OE) has evolved…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe how the understanding of the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and organizational effectiveness (OE) has evolved during the past three decades and to provide examples how firms are using HRM to improve their OE today by addressing several challenges that result from a broader stakeholder model.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the past and current work on the relationship between HRM and OE.

Findings

This findings indicate that the relationship between HRM and OE is very different when comparing the past with the current work on the relationship between HRM and OE. A major reason for this is the current work on OE uses the multiple stakeholder model that accounts for many more stakeholders than the past work.

Practical implications

Human resource (HR) professionals have the opportunity to demonstrate many ways by which HRM can influence OE, and not just solely on the basis of firm profitability. Thus the use of the multiple stakeholder model today offers the HR professional and the HR profession many more opportunities to demonstrate their importance and impact.

Originality/value

A systematic review and comparison of the past and current relationship between HRM and OE using the multiple stakeholder model have not been using both the viewpoints of both academics and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article

Stuart E. Jackson

Successful growth strategy has a lot to do with careful preparation to identify attractive markets and new sources of customer value and competitive advantage. If the plan

Abstract

Purpose

Successful growth strategy has a lot to do with careful preparation to identify attractive markets and new sources of customer value and competitive advantage. If the plan for achieving growth includes acquisitions, then we also have to consider company valuations and the availability of suitable acquisition targets. A challenge for many companies is knowing when and how much to adapt their strategy in the light of specific acquisition opportunities that become available. If a poorly‐performing competitor becomes available at a modest price should we try to adapt our strategy to take advantage of the opportunity? If the price for an attractive acquisition is bid up beyond expectations should we walk away or try to find a way to pay what the market says the company is worth? In this article, Stuart Jackson shows how successful acquirers combine both strategic discipline and a willingness to react quickly to market opportunities, an approach he calls strategic opportunism.

Design/methodology/approach

In this article, Jackson draws lessons from leading private equity investment groups, some of whom excel at this approach. To illustrate his points, Jackson uses the example of Snapple Beverage Corporation, a company that has been acquired four times since 1992, twice by private equity investors Thomas H. Lee and Triarc, and twice by corporate owners Quaker Oats and Cadbury Schweppes. Each owner brought different organizational priorities and different capabilities to add value to the business.

Findings

There is a huge disparity of returns for companies investing in the same business during different periods. The clear implication is that for a successful growth strategy involving acquisitions, companies need to get both the strategy and the timing right. This may require adjusting the strategy in light of opportunities that arise, and taking steps to align organization priorities and incentives.

Originality/value

By comparing the very different acquisition approaches of corporate and private equity investors, the article provides valuable insight into how private equity investors are often able to deliver strong performance even without the benefit of substantial synergies, while corporate acquisitions often fail to deliver attractive shareholder returns.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Book part

Quinetta M. Roberson, Bradford Bell and Shanette C. Porter

This chapter explores the role of language in the relationship between diversity and team performance. Specifically, we consider how a linguistic approach to social…

Abstract

This chapter explores the role of language in the relationship between diversity and team performance. Specifically, we consider how a linguistic approach to social categorization may be used to study the social psychological mechanisms that underlie diversity effects. Using the results of a study examining the effects of gender, ethnicity and tenure on language abstraction, we consider the potential implications for team processes and effectiveness. In addition, we propose a revised team input-process-output model that highlights the potential effects of language on team processes. We conclude by suggesting directions for future research linking diversity, linguistic categorization, and team effectiveness.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

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