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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Andrew D. Madden, Sheila Webber, Nigel Ford and Mary Crowder

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between preferred choice of school subject and student information behaviour (IB).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between preferred choice of school subject and student information behaviour (IB).

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were employed. In all, 152 students, teachers and librarians participated in interviews or focus groups. In total, 1,375 students, key stage 3 (11-14 years) to postgraduate, responded to a questionnaire. The research population was drawn from eight schools, two further education colleges and three universities. Insights from the literature review and the qualitative research phase led to a hypothesis which was investigated using the questionnaire: that students studying hard subjects are less likely to engage in deep IB than students studying soft subjects.

Findings

Results support the hypothesis that preferences for subjects at school affect choice of university degree. The hypothesis that a preference for hard or soft subjects affects IB is supported by results of an analysis in which like or dislike of maths/ICT is correlated with responses to the survey. Interviewees’ comments led to the proposal that academic subjects can be classified according to whether a subject helps students to acquire a “tool of the Mind” or to apply such a tool. A model suggesting how IB may differ depending on whether intellectual tools are being acquired or applied is proposed.

Practical implications

The “inner logic” of certain subjects and their pedagogies appears closely linked to IB. This should be considered when developing teaching programmes.

Originality/value

The findings offer a new perspective on subject classification and its association with IB, and a new model of the association between IB and tool acquisition or application is proposed, incorporating the perspectives of both teacher and student.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Andrew D. Madden, Nigel J. Ford, David Miller and Philippa Levy

A common criticism of research into information seeking on the internet is that information seekers are restricted by the demands of the researcher. Another criticism is…

Abstract

Purpose

A common criticism of research into information seeking on the internet is that information seekers are restricted by the demands of the researcher. Another criticism is that the search topics, are often imposed by the researcher, and; particularly when working with children, domain knowledge could be as important as information‐seeking skills. The research reported here attempts to address both these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 15 children, aged 11 to 16, were each set three “think aloud” internet searches. In the first, they were asked to recall the last time they had sought information on the internet, and to repeat the search. For the second, they were given a word, asked to interpret it, then asked to search for their interpretation. For the third, they were asked to recall the last time they had been unsuccessful in a search, and to repeat the search. While performing each task, the children were encouraged to explain their actions.

Findings

The paper finds that the factors that determined a child's ability to search successfully appeared to be: the amount of experience the child had of using the internet; the amount of guidance, both from adults and from peers; and the child's ability to explore the virtual environment, and to use the tools available for so doing.

Originality/value

Many of the searches performed by participants in this paper were not related to schoolwork, and so some of the search approaches differed from those taught by teachers. Instead, they evolved through exploration and exchange of ideas. Further studies of this sort could provide insights of value to designers of web environments.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Ioanna Ferra

Abstract

Details

Digital Media and the Greek Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-328-9

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Yazdan Mansourian and Andrew D. Madden

This paper seeks to review the methodologies employed by researchers working in the field of information seeking on the web. It aims to present an overall picture of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the methodologies employed by researchers working in the field of information seeking on the web. It aims to present an overall picture of the research methods used in the area, in a way that will be of value to anyone seeking to design research‐based studies of web searching.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the past 11 years of research on information seeking on the web was carried out. The paper focuses mainly on the methodological approaches adopted by researchers, but, where relevant, studies of different aspects of user interaction with web‐based search tools are considered.

Findings

The area is growing fast and the number of studies has been increasing steadily. A variety of research methods was employed in the studies reviewed here. However, the emphasis to date has been on quantitative rather than qualitative methods. The paper argues that a better balance is needed between these two approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Web search research comprises a wide range of related studies, making it difficult for the authors to carry out a comprehensive review. Nevertheless, limiting its focus to methodological aspects of the existing research, this paper provides a useful overview.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful starting‐point to any researcher new to web search research, enabling them quickly to achieve an overview of the methodological approaches adopted to date.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Abstract

In this chapter, I investigated how challenges (life events) are negotiated within families according to gender roles and their effect on marriage quality, life satisfaction, and psychological resilience in a nonclinical sample of heterosexual couples (N=159), age 23–78 (M=45.4, SD=11.2), with children (n=127) or childfree (n=32). Specifically, I accounted for the individual’s ability to share “hurt feelings” and foster intimacy within the couple, thus strengthening resilience and improving life satisfaction and hypothesized that the impact of negative life events on both relationship quality and life satisfaction could depend on the resilience levels of each partner and their ratio according to gender roles. Results confirmed the hypothesis and showed significant gender differences in the impact of negative life events on relationship quality, life satisfaction, ability to share hurt feelings, fear of intimacy, and resilience levels. Moreover, the ratio of the partner’s individual resilience affected the dependent variables differently by gender, its level interacted with the age of the couple’s first child (range: 2–54, mean: 21.4, SD: 10.4) and strongly depended on the occupation of the parents.

Details

Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Jane K. Lê and Torsten Schmid

While qualitative work has a long tradition in the strategy field and has recently regained popularity, we have not paused to take stock of how such work offers…

Abstract

While qualitative work has a long tradition in the strategy field and has recently regained popularity, we have not paused to take stock of how such work offers contributions. We address this oversight with a review of qualitative studies of strategy published in five top-tier journals over an extended period of 15 years (2003–2017). In an attempt to organize the field, we develop an empirically grounded organizing framework. We identify 12 designs that are evident in the literature, or “designs-in-use” as we call them. Acknowledging important similarities and differences between the various approaches to qualitative strategy research (QSR), we group these designs into three “families” based on their philosophical orientation. We use these designs and families to identify trends in QSR. We then engage those trends to orient the future development of qualitative methods in the strategy field.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock, Joseph A. Allen and Mark van Vugt

Teams in organizations have weekly – or even daily – meetings to exchange information, generate ideas, solve problems, and make decisions. Yet, many team meetings are…

Abstract

Teams in organizations have weekly – or even daily – meetings to exchange information, generate ideas, solve problems, and make decisions. Yet, many team meetings are described as ineffective by the participants, due to either their design or dysfunctional communication practices within the meeting. To gain new insights into addressing these issues, this chapter goes back deep in history and discusses the origins and functions of group meetings. Building upon evolutionary theories of human behavior, the authors examine the evolutionary significance of meetings and the ways in which they were adaptive for our human ancestors. Drawing from this evolutionary perspective, we then compare meetings in ancestral times with their modern-day counterparts. Using evidence from (a) ethnographic studies of small-scale societies that model ancestral group life and (b) organizational and team science, we contrast the typical workplace meeting with its ancient counterpart. In this review of ancient and modern meetings, we identify meeting characteristics that have been maintained through time as well as those that are unique/new in the modern time. In doing so, we inspect to what extent meeting practices in ancestral environments are aligned or at odds with meeting practices in contemporary organizations (the notion of mismatch). From these similarities and differences, we derive novel theoretical insights for the study of workplace meetings as well as suggestions for improving contemporary meeting practice. We also include a series of testable propositions that can inform future research on team meetings in organizations.

Details

Managing Meetings in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-227-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Jamshid Beheshti, Mohammed J. AlGhamdi, Charles Cole, Dhary Abuhimed and Isabelle Lamoureux

The chapter describes a four-year research project, the objective of which was to design and develop an intervention tool to assist middle school students in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter describes a four-year research project, the objective of which was to design and develop an intervention tool to assist middle school students in their information seeking when engaged in an inquiry-based learning project.

Methodology/approach

Bonded design method was used to design a proof-of-concept (POC) low-tech Guide, and focus group and Informant Design methods were utilized to develop a Web Guide.

Findings

In creating an intervention tool, whether low-tech paper-based or high-tech websites, different methodologies that relied heavily on the participation of students in the design process were successfully utilized.

Practical implications

The research shows that participation of children and adolescents in designing the content of technology for educational use is imperative.

Originality/value

This is a long-term research project, which is unparalleled and unique in its scope, duration, breadth, and depth. Having access to the grade eight classes in a single school over a four-year period has proven to be a remarkable research opportunity, seldom reported in the literature.

Details

New Directions in Children’s and Adolescents’ Information Behavior Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-814-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Yazdan Mansourian and Andrew D. Madden

The purpose of this paper is to report selective findings from a wider study of web‐based information‐seeking behaviour amongst biologists. It aims to describe: aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report selective findings from a wider study of web‐based information‐seeking behaviour amongst biologists. It aims to describe: aspects of the participants' interactions with web‐based search tools; their feelings associated with these interactions, and the different types of searches that they carry out on the web.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by semi‐structured interviews, and were analysed using a grounded theory approach. A qualitative approach was adopted in order to allow deep exploration of the information‐seeking processes adopted by the target group.

Findings

Participants in this study typically categorized their web searches as either work‐related or everyday life searches. They felt more confident carrying out work‐related searches and their search strategies in this category of search were more effective: generally, their work‐related searches were well‐defined and specific. Their everyday life searches covered a wider range of topics, and were occasionally very challenging. Participants carrying out everyday life searches cited as common problems, the selection of apposite search terms, and uncertainty in selecting the most suitable database.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a small sample of academic web users, and it will be useful to carry out follow‐up research using larger samples from biology or other areas of science. Despite this limitation, the findings clearly show the value of allowing users to customise web search facilities. They will also be of value to information literacy instructors developing information skills courses.

Originality/value

Biologists' information‐seeking behaviour on the web has not been investigated before and the paper contributes to the current body of knowledge about information‐seeking behaviour by providing empirical findings relating to the behaviour of this particular group of web users.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

A.D. Madden

One difficulty faced by students on many information management courses is the lack of any attempt to teach concepts of information. Therefore, if a core module does not…

Abstract

One difficulty faced by students on many information management courses is the lack of any attempt to teach concepts of information. Therefore, if a core module does not fit in with a student’s existing concept of information, it can make it hard for the student to recognise the relevance of that module. This paper addresses that problem by summarising concepts of information, and by presenting a simple model that attempts to unite the various concepts listed. The model is based on the idea that the meaning in a message depends on the context in which the message originated (the authorial context), and the context in which it is interpreted (the readership context). Characteristics of authors, readers and messages are discussed. The impact of the ‘knowledge’ of ‘information’ users, and of their community, is considered. Implications of the model are discussed. A definition of information is suggested, which attempts to encapsulate the nature of information implied by the model.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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