Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1958

A.D. Baxter and S.W. Greenwood

ROCKET and ramjet engines have not the universal application that gas turbines command and possibly on this account they have not had, until recent years, the development…

Abstract

ROCKET and ramjet engines have not the universal application that gas turbines command and possibly on this account they have not had, until recent years, the development effort which gave such amazing results in turbine powered aircraft. Nevertheless, they have demonstrated quite dramatically in various parts of the world that they are power plants to be reckoned with. In Great Britain, their value for aircraft was appreciated somewhat belatedly and events have since decreed that the promise they showed should be smothered before it could become a vital fact. On the other hand their importance for missiles was realized at the conclusion of the 1939–45 war, but again they were not encouraged on anything like the scale that present events show would have been justified. Because of this lack of encouragement, British rockets and ramjets, instead of leading the world, as do gas turbines, are struggling hard to provide a modest rate of progress.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1958

AS usual this September issue is timed to appear on the occasion of the S.B.A.C. Display at Farnborough, and as usual we publish in it a specially commissioned article…

Abstract

AS usual this September issue is timed to appear on the occasion of the S.B.A.C. Display at Farnborough, and as usual we publish in it a specially commissioned article which is intended to give the background to British achievement in a particular field of aeronautical progress. This year it is a survey of work done on rockets and ramjets, contributed by PROFESSOR A. D. BAXTER and MR S. W. GREENWOOD. It is our hope that our readers will find this extensive article useful, providing as it does a statement of achievement to date in the light of which the latest advances on show at Farnborough can be considered in true perspective.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1948

THERE is considerable interest at the present time in the various means of obtaining a temporary increase in aeroplane performance for some special purpose and the paper…

Abstract

THERE is considerable interest at the present time in the various means of obtaining a temporary increase in aeroplane performance for some special purpose and the paper by MR A. D. BAXTER in this issue on power boosting by re‐heat is, therefore, timely. Actually, it is based on experiments and experiences with Wellands in Meteors to meet the threat of the German V‐1 missiles and so concerns itself only with work done four years ago behind the veil of secrecy imposed by war conditions;details of which it has not been thought politic to release sooner. It is none the less interesting, not only because it deals with principles, which do not change, and shows how the first problems were tackled and difficulties overcome, but also because it establishes the fact that, as in so many other matters to do with aviation, it was the engineers of Great Britain and nowhere else who pioneered the way into a then unknown development of the jet engine—which was itself at that time a comparatively new type of power plant evolved in this country.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 20 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1953

A.D. Baxter

IT is well known that war gives a great impetus to development in many fields, not least of which is that of aircraft propulsion. Such was the case in World War II, when…

Abstract

IT is well known that war gives a great impetus to development in many fields, not least of which is that of aircraft propulsion. Such was the case in World War II, when great strides were made, but it is interesting to note that the pace has hardly slackened in the years following its conclusion. This is perhaps because of the ‘cold’ war which took its place, or perhaps because the introduction of jet propulsion has stimulated thought and action in realms beyond the dreams of the piston engine era. Whatever the cause, the results are apparent and this is a suitable moment to look back and measure the progress of the past seven or eight years.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Aryn Baxter, David W. Chapman, Joan DeJaeghere, Amy R. Pekol and Tamara Weiss

Entrepreneurship education and training are an increasingly widespread component of governmental and nongovernmental efforts to address the interrelated challenges of…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education and training are an increasingly widespread component of governmental and nongovernmental efforts to address the interrelated challenges of youth unemployment and poverty reduction. In the absence of consensus regarding how best to design learning opportunities that effectively prepare youth to improve their livelihoods, this chapter explores the central debates surrounding three components that are integrated into most entrepreneurship training initiatives: learning, earning, and saving. Drawing on existing literature and considering three entrepreneurship training programs underway in East Africa, the authors argue that the effectiveness of any particular youth entrepreneurship program is highly dependent on a variety of contextual considerations, many of which are beyond the control of individual youth and program managers. Implications of this are that (a) program managers need to be modest in their expectations of program effects and avoid overpromising, (b) training is needed to help prepare youth to recognize, understand, and cope with various contextual factors that impact their livelihoods, and (c) NGOs and other private organizations that implement such programs are in a position to address certain contextual factors. By highlighting key debates relevant to the design of entrepreneurship training programs, this chapter contributes to the development of entrepreneurship training initiatives that are responsive to contextual realities, thereby increasing the potential effectiveness of entrepreneurship training as a poverty alleviation strategy.

Details

International Educational Innovation and Public Sector Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-708-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1966

A.D. Baxter

THE history of the Society is a fascinating subject and one worthy of considerable study. On January 12, 1866, six men met at the London home of the eighth Duke of Argyll…

Abstract

THE history of the Society is a fascinating subject and one worthy of considerable study. On January 12, 1866, six men met at the London home of the eighth Duke of Argyll to found, the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain. They declared their belief in the achievement of human flight and their determination to advance it scientifically. Of the six founders, the three who contributed most to its advancement were James Glaisher, astronomer and meteorologist and a Fellow of the Royal Society, F. H. Wenham, a marine engineer, and F. W. Brearey, convenor of the first meeting, who was neither scientist nor engineer but an enthusiast who was to be the Honorary Secretary of the Society until 1896. These three played complementary parts, but it is probable that the contribution of Wenham exerted most practical influence on the Society's progress.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 38 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1947

A.D. Baxter

THE rocket motor is a form of jet propulsion which is characterized by independence of the external atmosphere for combustion, relative independence of altitude and flight…

Abstract

THE rocket motor is a form of jet propulsion which is characterized by independence of the external atmosphere for combustion, relative independence of altitude and flight velocity upon thrust, small frontal area for high thrusts, simple construction and low weight, and high rate of fuel consumption. Its use was greatly developed during the war years and many applications are now familiar to all. Most of the work on rocket missiles, such as the anti‐aircraft barrages, fighter armament, etc., was performed with solid fuel rockets, but liquid fuels were developed by the Germans for the well‐known V.2, for the Me. 163 aircraft, the Henschel glide bomb and various other applications. They concentrated a great deal of effort on this work and considerable technical progress had been made with different systems. Three main systems emerged and these were distinguished by the oxygen bearing fluids they used. The fluids were:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1952

A.D. Baxter

THE first gas turbine propelled aircraft in this country were the result of Whittle's classic conception using a single‐stage centrifugal compressor. On the other hand the…

Abstract

THE first gas turbine propelled aircraft in this country were the result of Whittle's classic conception using a single‐stage centrifugal compressor. On the other hand the German turbo‐jets had, without exception, multi‐stage axial compressors. The two types are shown diagrammatically in FIG. 1 and the outstanding differences are apparent at a glance. The centrifugal is short and of large diameter and the air flow through the compressor is turned from the axial direction to the radial and then back to the axial. On the other hand, the axial compressor derives its name from the substantially unidirectional flow of the air. It is of relatively small diameter, but much longer because of its many stages, each stage consisting of a large number of moving blades and an equal number of fixed blades. Altogether there may be between one thousand and two thousand individual blades in the compressor. It is from these contrasting features that much argument has arisen.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1950

J.W. Tomlinson

DYNAMIC balancing has become an important function in the production and repair of gas turbines used in aircraft. It is now general practice to dynamic balance every…

Abstract

DYNAMIC balancing has become an important function in the production and repair of gas turbines used in aircraft. It is now general practice to dynamic balance every turbine wheel and impeller assembly before fitting to the engine. Maintenance engineers, while having a background in the theory of vibrations caused by unbalance, must now know the practical side of dynamic balancing, since it is almost impossible to carry out a major overhaul without checking the balance of the rotating assemblies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Nicola Headlam

As a network analyst, I am fascinated by social interactions. The ways in which people connect with one another and exercise power and authority by deploying different…

Abstract

As a network analyst, I am fascinated by social interactions. The ways in which people connect with one another and exercise power and authority by deploying different forms of capital. This piece returns to the underlying and changing kinship network structure of the village of Ambridge over time, explores the role of ‘kin-keeping’ as deployed by the matriarchs Peggy and Jill. I am most interested in the ways in which gender as performed by the women of the village intersects with abundance or lack of other forms of capital, and how far inequalities persist and why. It is clear that there is an intergenerational power dynamic at play in the spreading or hoarding of the various dimensions of power layered together and how forms of capital intersect for protection or precarity. Social and cultural capital at birth in the village is defining in terms of both ‘serious’ life outcomes as well as how more minor infractions and foibles are viewed. Further, I return to discuss how my various network-based predictions have fared over time. The Headlam Hypothesis and the fate of Ed Grundy – King of Ambridge are revisited and their durability explored.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000