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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

A. Zorotheos and E. Kafeza

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the internet users' privacy concerns (concerns for information privacy, CFIP) and perceived privacy control (PPC) affect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the internet users' privacy concerns (concerns for information privacy, CFIP) and perceived privacy control (PPC) affect their willingness to use internet web places in order to transact. A theoretical model is introduced that describes how users' CFIP and PPC may affect their willingness to transact through web places when personal information must be disclosed in order to accomplish the transaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is empirically tested using data collected with a survey that include items for each of the constructs of the model. The survey is administrated to 190 internet users and resulted in 142 usable responses through questionnaires. In order to test the hypotheses, multidimensional regression analysis is used.

Findings

The findings indicate that both users' CFIP and users' PPC (some dimensions of them) have direct impact not only to users' trust toward the web site as expected but also to the willingness to transact through the internet when personal information needs to be disclosed.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, an introductory analysis is conducted in order to preliminary test the validity and credibility of the research model. In this first approach, the multidimensional regression analysis is used. Currently, the paper deals with the use of structural equation modeling in order to better test the research model. The research could be conducted also online in order to investigate users' behavior under real circumstances.

Practical implications

The more users know about their personal information the less willing they are to make purchases through internet. Moreover, if web places improve their mechanisms and procedures that correct better the inaccuracies and the errors in the users' stored personal data then users' willingness to retrieve information from web sites improves too.

Originality/value

Existing studies constitute the basic theoretical framework but until now there is not a model that connects both users' CFIP and users' PPC with the willingness to transact through the internet and with users' trust upon the web sites.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Vladlena Benson, Jean-Noel Ezingeard and Chris Hand

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by social media user traits, cognitive factors (such as perceived control and trust) and individual beliefs, such as risk propensity and trustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and empirically test a model of purchase intention on social platforms. The study of over 500 active social media users finds the links between risk propensity, trust, technical efficacy and perceived control and explores the moderating effect of age and gender.

Findings

Purchase intention on social platforms is influenced by demographic factors, cognitive factors and beliefs. Both age and gender moderate the effects of beliefs and cognitive factors: age is a determinant of purchase intention for men, while beliefs are significant for younger women and cognitive factors are significant for older women.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved a cross-sectional design via online survey of social networking users. Gender differences in purchase intentions are found which are, in turn, influenced by age. Further empirical testing of social purchase intention could include less experienced users or non-users.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide guidance for SNS providers and technology developers in social networking commerce in terms of the different drivers of purchase intention.

Originality/value

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood. The study shows that purchase intention antecedents vary between genders and age groups of users. The identified connection between users’ perceptions of social networking sites (SNS) usage of personal information and purchase behaviour has an impact on the likelihood of user engagement in social transactions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Ali Bassam Mahmoud, Nicholas Grigoriou, Leonora Fuxman, Dieu Hack-Polay, Fatina Bassam Mahmoud, Eiad Yafi and Shehnaz Tehseen

This study aims to assess consumers’ beliefs in three Middle Eastern Arab countries regarding attitudinal and behavioural responses towards permission-based direct email…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess consumers’ beliefs in three Middle Eastern Arab countries regarding attitudinal and behavioural responses towards permission-based direct email marketing (hereafter DEM) and the moderating role of gender in the hypothesised path model.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesised path model by using data collected from 829 respondents.

Findings

The findings show that attitude was found to fully mediate the relationship between beliefs and behavioural responses towards permission-based DEM. Gender moderates the relationship between beliefs and attitudes and responses to permission-based DEM. Notably, female respondents were found to react more actively when exposed to permission-based DEM.

Research limitations/implications

Further qualitative research is needed to learn more about how and why individuals develop behavioural intentions in certain ways towards opt-in DEM. In addition, neuropsychology approaches such as eye-tracking are endorsed for future research to gain more insights and conquer biases associated with self-reporting procedures in countries where such technologies are deemed as legal and ethical to be used with human subjects.

Practical implications

Advertisers promoting products and services in the Middle Eastern Arab context should take further steps to enhance the quality of information (including cultural sensitiveness) and the perceived entertainment value that could be delivered to consumers through permission-based DEM, especially for female internet users. Additionally, this study highly recommends the double opt-in approach to permission-based DEM.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to address the gender role as a moderator of the path depicting the effectiveness of permission-based DEM approach in the Middle East (Arab counties) from beliefs to behavioural responses via attitudes.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Ibrahim M. Al-Jabri, Mustafa I. Eid and Amer Abed

Customer privacy and security are major concerns. Online firms worldwide collect customer data for various reasons. This study aims to investigate factors that motivate…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer privacy and security are major concerns. Online firms worldwide collect customer data for various reasons. This study aims to investigate factors that motivate and hinder a customer’s willingness to disclose personal information (WTD) to online firms on e-commerce websites.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive literature review, three sets of factors have been identified. These sets of factors are privacy concern, perceived disclosure benefits and privacy assurances. It is hypothesized that privacy concerns negatively affect the disclosure of personal information, while the perceived benefits of disclosure have positive effects. Privacy assurances would positively affect information disclosure and attenuate the negative effect of privacy concerns on the disclosure of personal information. The authors gathered data from 253 online customers in Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived disclosure benefits and privacy concerns have a significant positive and negative relationship, respectively, with WTD online. Privacy assurances had neither a direct nor a moderating effect on information disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The findings will inform online firms about the factors that prevent or motivate customers to disclose personal information.

Originality/value

The effect of privacy concerns and benefits on personal information disclosure are not fully understood in Saudi Arabia. This study reveals more insights into the specific factors that make online customers reluctant or motivated to disclose their personal information.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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