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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

HELEN P. HARRISON

In addition to providing a review of the literature recently published in the librarianship of non‐book materials this survey aims to draw attention to the…

Abstract

In addition to providing a review of the literature recently published in the librarianship of non‐book materials this survey aims to draw attention to the characteristics, problems and achievements particular to the documentation and handling of non‐book materials (NBM) in many types of libraries. The materials are briefly described and considerations of selection, acquisition, organization, storage and in particular bibliographic control are dealt with in some detail. Other areas of concern to the librarian dealing with media resources, including the organization and training of staff, planning, equipment, exploitation and copyright, are also discussed. The past decade has seen the widespread introduction of NBM into libraries as additional or alternative sources of information. Librarians have been given an opportunity to rethink many basic principles and adapt existing practice to encompass the new materials. The survey reflects the achievements and some of the failures or problems remaining to be solved in this rapidly expanding area of library work.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

A. TREBBLE

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’…

Abstract

An account of the present ‘state of the art’ of the librarianship of non‐book materials must begin with a note on terminology. ‘Audiovisual materials’, ‘non‐print items’, and more imaginatively, ‘metabooks’, are some attempts at a collective description of film materials, sound recordings, and pictures of all kinds. The National Council for Educational Technology (NCET) favour ‘non‐book materials’, abbreviated to NBM. ‘One day, perhaps, the word “document” will be commonly accepted as connoting simply an embodiment of evidence, whether it be in print or pictures or whatever, and we shall take for granted that arrangements for the handling of documents should make provision as a matter of course for all media. In the meantime, the case must not be overlooked, and as an expression “non‐book material” is probably no more offensive and no less apt than its several rivals. “Non‐print document” is perhaps more accurate but is not yet in common use.’ I have adopted NBM.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

MRS Radha Nadarajah, Head of the School of Library Science at the Mara Institute of Technology in Kuala Lumpur and Vice‐President of the Malaysia Library Association was…

Abstract

MRS Radha Nadarajah, Head of the School of Library Science at the Mara Institute of Technology in Kuala Lumpur and Vice‐President of the Malaysia Library Association was in Britain during June and July, visiting library schools to discuss staff exchanges and recruitment for her school.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 15
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

The speaker at the Aslib evening meeting, to be held on Wednesday, 15 th March, 1972, will be Mr Charles Gibbs‐Smith, Keeper Emeritus, Victoria and Albert Museum, who will…

Abstract

The speaker at the Aslib evening meeting, to be held on Wednesday, 15 th March, 1972, will be Mr Charles Gibbs‐Smith, Keeper Emeritus, Victoria and Albert Museum, who will take a provocative look at recent trends in typography.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1927

In last month's issue of the Journal we published an abstract of the Annual Report of the Public Analyst for the City of Salford, Mr. H. H. Bagnall, B.Sc., F.I.C., and we…

Abstract

In last month's issue of the Journal we published an abstract of the Annual Report of the Public Analyst for the City of Salford, Mr. H. H. Bagnall, B.Sc., F.I.C., and we gave particular prominence to that portion of his report which related to the analyses of seven samples of toffee. The instances of gross exaggeration and falsehood in advertisements to which Mr. Bagnall calls attention are really very much akin to the misdescription of an article upon the label, and such procedure should undoubtedly be a punishable offence. It is an unfortunate fact that exaggeration or misrepresentation are not uncommon features of the claims made in advertisements of the present day, but if public attention is called to blatant examples of this kind, much may be done towards educating the purchaser to realise that laudatory statements made by a manufacturer in regard to his own goods are at best biassed and in many cases false and misleading. Unimpeachable and independent testimony is the only thing which can carry conviction to the purchaser.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Edward McFadyen

The major problem confronting the independent chemist over the past ten years has been the incursion into the OTC market — and in particular toiletries — of the multiple…

Abstract

The major problem confronting the independent chemist over the past ten years has been the incursion into the OTC market — and in particular toiletries — of the multiple grocer, especially the supermarket. To counteract this, independent chemists formed the voluntary group Numark, which recently held its annual conference in Paris. Currently with annual sales of £300m, Numark is establishing itself in terms of profitable marketiang and an intelligent application of data processing techniques to its retailer and wholesaler members.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Shamsuddin Ahmed and Addas F. Mohammed

Accident emergency hospital (AEH) services require cohesive, collective, uninterrupted streamlined medical diagnostic and satisfactory patient care. Medical service…

Abstract

Purpose

Accident emergency hospital (AEH) services require cohesive, collective, uninterrupted streamlined medical diagnostic and satisfactory patient care. Medical service efficiency in AEHs is difficult to quantify due to the clinical complexity involved in treatment involving various units, patient conditions, changes in contemporary medical practices and technological developments. This paper aims to show how to measure efficiency by eliminating waste in AEH system, identify service failure points, identify benchmark medical services, identify patient throughput time and measure treatment time when AEH services are nonstandard. The applications shown in this paper are distinct in particular; we the authors use nontraditional and systems engineering approach to collect data as the traditional data collection is difficult in real-time AEHs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors show in this study how to measure overall patient treatment time from admission to discharge. Project evaluation and review technique (PERT) captures the inconsistencies involved in measuring treatment time, including measures of variability. The irregular treatment time and complexity involved in the emergency health-care services are usual. The research methodology illustrates how the time function map and service blueprint can improve value-added time in AEHs and benchmark services between similar AEHs.

Findings

The inconsistency in treatment time between AEH in public and private hospital is found to be in ratio of 1:20. The private hospital suggests variety of treatments and long stays for recovery. The PERT computations show that the average time a patient remains in a government AEH is about 10 days. The standard deviation of the AEH treatment time is about 0.043 per cent of the expected patient care time. The inconsistency is not significant as compared to the expected value. In 89.64 per cent of the cases, a patient may be discharged in less than 10 days’ time. The patient on average is discharged in 13 days in a private hospital.

Originality/value

The patient treatment time of an AEH is evaluated with PERT project management approach to account for inconsistencies in treatment time. This research makes new contributions in benchmarking AEH throughput time, identify medical service failure points with service blueprint, measure the efficiency with time function map and collect patient data with nontraditional methods. The inherent inconsistencies in a clinical process are identified by PERT analysis with the variance as a characteristic of the treatment time. Improvement of variability implies cost reduction in AEH system.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Jane Bailey and Raine Liliefeldt

The emergence of Technology-Facilitated violence and abuse (TFVA) has led to calls for increased collaboration across and among sectors. Growing recognition of the need…

Abstract

The emergence of Technology-Facilitated violence and abuse (TFVA) has led to calls for increased collaboration across and among sectors. Growing recognition of the need for multistakeholder collaboration (MSC) between industry, civil society, government, and academia reflects the number of moving parts involved, the need for specialized knowledge and skills in relation to certain issues, and the importance of recognizing the ways in which interlocking systems of subordination can lead to very different experiences with and impressions of social justice issues (Crenshaw, 1991). Numerous financial, professional, and personal factors incentivize MSC. Notwithstanding growing opportunities and incentives for TFVA-related MSC, collaborative efforts bring with them their own set of challenges. This chapter integrates elements of the literature on MSC, particularly those focusing on risks, benefits, and ways forward, with excerpts from a dialogue between an academic and community organization leader who are collaborating on a research partnership encompassing TFVA against young Canadians.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Angelique Lombarts

This chapter seeks to investigate the journey of breast and bowel cancer patients at the HMC Antoniushove. It zooms in on specific touch points and the possibilities for…

Abstract

This chapter seeks to investigate the journey of breast and bowel cancer patients at the HMC Antoniushove. It zooms in on specific touch points and the possibilities for improvements. Furthermore, it elucidates the learning process and more particular the dissemination between the hospital (staff and medical students) and hospitality students and professionals and emphasizes that looking from different perspectives and various disciplines is beneficial for all the stakeholders involved in hospitals.

Diseases are increasingly chronic; patients are more demanding and competition between different hospitals is increasing. That is why, in addition to excellent medical treatment, excellent service (referred to here as hospitality) is becoming increasingly important in the healthcare sector, including in hospitals. What does it have to meet? What do patients appreciate, what needs to be improved and how can these improvements be designed and implemented with the involvement of both patients and hospital staff?

Medical and hospitality students collaborated in this project analysing and describing the journey of patients with breast and bowel cancer. They examined the patient journey and elucidated the touch points, which patients indicated as critical during their ‘journey’.

Most important finding resulted from the learning process of this collaboration and the insight gained, a greater awareness and understanding of the non-medical needs and wishes, i.e. hospitality, of patients. Furthermore, the mutual understanding between the evidence-based stance of thinking of medical students and hospital staff at the one side and the more on soft skills–focused attitude of hospitality students on the other hand increased.

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Marie Nagy, Mary Chiarella, Belinda Bennett, Merrilyn Walton and Terry Carney

The “patient journey” technique is one that has been used by health care providers to investigate the strengths and weaknesses of their service delivery. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The “patient journey” technique is one that has been used by health care providers to investigate the strengths and weaknesses of their service delivery. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the experience of adapting this approach for use in an atypical context – the comparison of two systems for managing health care complaints and notifications. It highlights a number of relevant considerations and provides suggestions for similar studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The design and methods of the study are described, with commentary on the success of key aspects and challenges encountered. To enable comparison between the two systems, this study had a “paired” design, in which examples were selected from each system so that they matched on basic, prescribed, criteria. Data about each matter’s journey were then collected from administrative records.

Findings

While, overall, the technique provided rich data on the processes of the systems under investigation, the type of data collected (related to administrative/communicative events) and the study’s comparative purpose required consideration and management of a number of issues. These included the implications of using administrative records and the impact of differences between the systems on the paired design.

Originality/value

This paper describes an attempt to apply the “journey” approach in a context that is uncommon in two ways: first, in its focus on regulatory processes (complaint/notification handling), rather than care provision to an individual patient; and second, in its objective of comparing two different systems. It is hoped this account will assist in further development of this technique.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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