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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Mohamad Isa Abd Jalil, Sofri Yahya and Anwar Allah Pitchay

The purpose of this study is to conceptualise the relationship between information disclosure and Waqif commitment, taking into consideration the role of level of trust…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conceptualise the relationship between information disclosure and Waqif commitment, taking into consideration the role of level of trust (mediator variable) and communication and type of payment (moderator variables).

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework is developed from the theory of social exchange (mediated philanthropy model) and selected previous literature concerning commitment.

Findings

According to previous empirical research, a conceptual framework was developed to facilitate further analysis in the study. Nine propositions were raised in this paper where the factor of communication and payment method is proposed to no longer the factor that determined commitment but as moderator. There is five antecedent of information disclosure proposed, which is basic information, financial information, non-financial information, future information and governance information. Also, trust is offered to be the mediator variable between information disclosure and Waqf commitment.

Research limitations/implications

By realising many factors that may influence the commitment of waqf such as demonstrable utility, emotional utility and familial utility, this study only focusses on the effect of information disclosure.

Practical implications

This paper provides an opportunity for further empirical studies to prove the relationship between information disclosure and Waqf commitment. This paper also brought opportunities to investigate both conceptually and empirically, other factors that could affect Waqf commitment.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, few studies have been done concerning donors commitment. While there are none yet, the research examined Waqf commitment. The originality value of this study is that there is a gap in knowledge regarding the analysis of Waqf commitment, the level of trust among waqif is the information that Waqf expected, the preferred communication between Mutawalli and Waqf and type of payment that Waqf favoured. This study is believed to be a novel based on the framework developed.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Gary Gregory, Liem Ngo and Ryan Miller

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand salience and brand attitude as antecedents of brand choice intention, moderated by donor decision involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 generates measures using interviews with marketing, media and research managers, and new donors from two international aid and relief organizations. Study 2 uses an experimental design to first test scenarios of disaster relief, and then validate and confirm a new donor decision model using large-scale consumer panels for the international aid and relief sector in Australia.

Findings

The results replicated across four leading international aid-related charities reveal that brand salience is positively related to brand choice intention through the mediating effect of brand attitude. Furthermore, the effect of brand salience on brand choice intention is significantly stronger when donor decision involvement is low. Conversely, the effect of brand attitude on brand choice intention is stronger for higher levels of donor decision involvement.

Practical implications

Managers should understand the importance of brand salience/attitudes and the implications for the communication strategy. Managers should also strive to understand the level of decision involvement and the relative influence of brand attitude/salience on brand choice intention.

Originality/value

This study advances the literature on charitable giving by proposing and testing a moderated mediation model of donor choice when selecting a charity for donation. Findings provide new insights into the extent to which brand salience, brand attitude and donor decision-making influence how new donors choose between charities for donation.

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Murtala Oladimeji Abioye Mustafa, Muslim Har Sani Mohamad and Muhammad Akhyar Adnan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and explain the factors underlying the inclination of zakat payers to trust a particular zakat institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and explain the factors underlying the inclination of zakat payers to trust a particular zakat institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review and experience survey, a context specific questionnaire was developed as the main method of quantitative data collection. The instrument was administered to a sample of Muslim professionals who observe religious seclusion in the last ten days of the Islamic fasting month (itqaf) in 12 purposely selected mosques across four states and the federal capital territory.

Findings

Drawn from the resource dependence and legitimacy theories, the study finds that board capital, disclosure practices, governmental model of zakat institution, and stakeholder management were identified through the use of structural equation modeling as being the antecedents of zakat payers' trust.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to report an empirically based model of zakat payers' trust.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Promotion, Recruitment and Retention of Members in Nonprofit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-659-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Meungguk Park, Taeho Yoh and David J. Shonk

Understanding factors that enhance participants' satisfaction has become critical to developing effective donor retention strategies for charity sport events (CSEs)…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding factors that enhance participants' satisfaction has become critical to developing effective donor retention strategies for charity sport events (CSEs). However, there is a lack of empirical research on participants' satisfaction with CSEs. The purpose of this study is to examine the antecedents and consequences of satisfaction among CSE participants and to empirically test the relationships between the proposed constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 238 participants from four Relay For Life (RFL) events organized by the American Cancer Society, North Central Region in the USA. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were conducted to analyze the measurement model and the structural model.

Findings

The results of the structural model indicated that perceived prosocial impact, sense of community and trust in CSE had significant positive effects on CSE satisfaction, while venue quality, knowledge attainment and entertainment value did not positively influence CSE satisfaction. CSE satisfaction had a positive direct effect on participant loyalty to CSE, which had a significant contribution to future participant intent.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide CSE directors and marketers with valuable insights into the process of how to build long-term relationships with participants by identifying factors that influence participants' satisfaction and its consequences.

Originality/value

By measuring the mediating role of CSE satisfaction, this study provides a deeper understanding of the causal pathways from the antecedents to participant loyalty through CSE satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Gerard P. Prendergast and Chan Hak Wai Maggie

Charitable organizations need to have an in‐depth understanding of their donors in order to retain their donations and attract new donors. This is particularly the case…

Abstract

Purpose

Charitable organizations need to have an in‐depth understanding of their donors in order to retain their donations and attract new donors. This is particularly the case when the relationship with the donor is expected to be sustained rather than a one‐off donation. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to discover the essence of donors' experiences of joining a child sponsorship program. The central research question is: What does it mean to be a child sponsor?

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological methodology was used to explore the experiences associated with charitable giving for individuals providing long‐term financial support to disadvantaged children.

Findings

An analysis of 84 significant statements from a series of in‐depth interviews revealed that sponsors experience both gains and losses from sponsoring a child. Financial ability and peers are influential in motivating child sponsorship, but the decision to sponsor a child is often not shared with family members. Sponsors indicated that they want to establish a close relationship with their sponsored child and they tend to sponsor children whom they perceive as similar in some respect to themselves.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on existing sponsors and did not consider lapsers. Second, although interviewing was continued to the point of saturation, and although the sample size was relatively large for a phenomenological study, caution must be exercised when trying to extrapolate the findings to a broader population.

Practical implications

Charities should take a proactive role in managing communication between beneficiaries and sponsors. It is particularly important for the beneficiaries to communicate with the sponsors so as to give the sponsor the feeling of sponsoring a friend/family member. Charities could encourage their current sponsors to actively share their happiness and satisfaction with their friends. Testimonials and referral programs wherein happy sponsors share their experiences with potential sponsors would probably be productive. Finally, charities should aim to match sponsors and beneficiaries, at least in terms of nationality.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate long‐term charitable giving using an interpretative framework. The findings extend understanding of the experiences underlying sustained charitable giving and will be useful for charitable organizations seeking to understand more about the experiences of sponsors. Consideration of the findings will help charities maintain long‐term donor relationships and encourage more people to undertake long‐term sponsorship commitments.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Min Teah, Michael Lwin and Isaac Cheah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between image of charitable organizations, attitudes towards charities and motivation to donate. In addition, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between image of charitable organizations, attitudes towards charities and motivation to donate. In addition, the study will investigate the moderating effects of religious beliefs on attitudes towards charities and motivation to donate.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Trained interviewers employed a mall-intercept method in downtown Kuala Lumpur over both weekdays and weekends. The scales are adapted from established sources.

Findings

It was found that religious beliefs moderates the relationship between attitudes towards charities and motivation to donate. In addition, image of charitable organizations has a positive influence on attitudes towards charities. It was also found that both image of charitable organizations and attitudes towards charities influence motivation to donate.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted within downtown Kuala Lumpur and is not generalizable across Malaysia and other countries. In addition, this study only looked at general religious beliefs, therefore findings are not specific to a religion. As a result, possible religious differences may be neglected. Lastly, the study only focused on donors and further studies need to be conducted on non-donors to further understand donation behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings from the study provide valuable insights to charities, government bodies and policy makers as it highlights the linkages between image of charitable organizations, attitudes towards charities and the motivation to donate of past donors. Additionally, religious bodies can also use the findings to formulate communication strategies to benefit charities as well as the broader community.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the motivations of donors to donate to charities. More importantly, it also examines the influence of religious beliefs on donation behaviour, thus shedding insights on the opportunities for fundraising by charities.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Larissa M. Sundermann

Although antecedents and consequences for the sender of word of mouth (WOM) are well evaluated in many research fields, non-profit service research focusing on…

Abstract

Purpose

Although antecedents and consequences for the sender of word of mouth (WOM) are well evaluated in many research fields, non-profit service research focusing on consequences for WOM receivers is limited. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide evidence for the positive effect that WOM has on commitment, trust, satisfaction and identification (relationship-related factors) and on intentional loyalty of blood donors. Furthermore, the role of the social reference group and the incentive ethics are analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

Blood donors of the German Red Cross Blood Donor Service were invited to take part in an online survey during May/June 2016. A total of 702 (23.74 per cent) blood donors, who first donated in 2015/2016, participated. The data were analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results provide evidence that the mere presence of receiving WOM positively influences commitment, satisfaction and identification as well as intentional loyalty. The negative moderation effect of incentive ethics was partially confirmed.

Practical implications

This study recommends using WOM approaches to bind donors but first evaluating the exact consequences of provided WOM rewards. WOM is an effective strategy, and non-profit organizations (NPOs) should use this to strengthen their relationship with donors.

Originality value

The paper provides and tests a theoretical framework to evaluate the impact of receiving WOM on relationship-related factors and intentional loyalty. It fills a gap in current discussions about the effectiveness of WOM as a marketing strategy to strengthen donor–NPO relationships.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

A. Sargeant, E. Sadler‐Smith and A. Dawson

In 1995 the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter (with backing from the local Training Enterprise Council) took the decision to collaborate on an extensive piece of market…

Abstract

In 1995 the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter (with backing from the local Training Enterprise Council) took the decision to collaborate on an extensive piece of market research, designed to bring them closer to their local business community. Reviews the findings of that study which relate to businesses’ perceptions of the two institutions. Concludes that university services are perceived as being of the highest quality, but there is little awareness of the full range of services currently on offer. There is also evidence that both institutions need to improve their marketing activities, both in terms of providing an appropriate range of services and by ensuring that these are adequately promoted to the target market.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Amber L. Stephenson and David B. Yerger

As colleges and universities face the shifts of decreasing government funds, increased operating costs, and waning alumni financial support, institutions are now plunging…

Abstract

Purpose

As colleges and universities face the shifts of decreasing government funds, increased operating costs, and waning alumni financial support, institutions are now plunging themselves into practices traditionally associated with the business sector. Practices like branding are now being used as a mechanism to increase engagement of alumni and potential donors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of brand identification, or the defining of the self through association with an organization, on alumni supportive behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers surveyed alumni of a mid-sized state-run university in the mid-Atlantic region of the USA to see if identification affected donation behaviors such as choice to donate, total dollar amount donated, and the number of times donated.

Findings

The survey findings showed that brand identification correlated with choice to donate, increased donation dollar amount, and the number of donations. Findings also suggested that interpretation of brand, prestige, satisfaction with student affairs, and participation were positively associated with identification.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are specific to one institution. This research offers support for the importance and value of brand management in higher education. The study also highlights those determinants of brand identification which suggests the use of integrative fundraising techniques.

Originality/value

The study highlighted that university brand identification increases the explanatory power for alumni donor behaviors over those variables typically explored in traditional donor models.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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