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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Wouter Vanderplasschen, Stijn Vandevelde, Franky D’Oosterlinck, Dirk Vandevelde, Jan Naert and Rowdy Yates

Eric Broekaert passed away shortly after the XVIth European Working group on Drug-Oriented Research (EWODOR)-conference in Rome on 28 September 2016. He was one of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Eric Broekaert passed away shortly after the XVIth European Working group on Drug-Oriented Research (EWODOR)-conference in Rome on 28 September 2016. He was one of the great TC pioneers in Europe, who founded the first TC for addictions in Belgium (De Kiem) and co-founded the European Federation of Therapeutic Communities and EWODOR. He was a respected Professor of “Orthopedagogics” at Ghent University and a Member of the Editorial Collective of Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities. The paper aims to discuss the overview of the career of Eric Broekaert.

Design/methodology/approach

In this obituary, the authors provide an overview of his career, major achievements and theoretical, methodological and integrative ideas, clustered around four typologies: university professor and scholar; manager and source of inspiration; TC pioneer and believer, and integrative thinker.

Findings

Besides his obvious merits as a TC researcher and advocate, one of his major theoretical contributions has been the introduction of the holistic, integrative approach and the idea that diverse types of interventions, as well as methodological approaches can alternatively go together.

Originality/value

He regarded TCs as the ultimate integration of various educational and therapeutic approaches to promote growth and quality of life among severely disadvantaged populations, such as drug addicts and children and adults with emotional and behavioural disorders.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Abstract

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of…

Abstract

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of some of the industrial applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

P. Vuylsteke, P. Defraeye, J. Van Daele, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to…

Abstract

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to a 16‐bit microprocessor enables the recognition to be achieved within 30 milliseconds.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Savva Shanaev, Nikita Shimkus, Binam Ghimire and Satish Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to study LEGO sets as a potential alternative asset class. An exhaustive sample of 10,588 sets is used to generate inferences regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study LEGO sets as a potential alternative asset class. An exhaustive sample of 10,588 sets is used to generate inferences regarding long-term LEGO performance, its diversification benefits and return determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

LEGO set performance is studied in terms of equal- and value-weighted portfolios, sorts based on set characteristics and cross-sectional regressions.

Findings

Over 1966–2018, LEGO value-weighted index accounted for survivorship bias enjoys 1.20% inflation-adjusted return per annum, well below 5.54% for equities. However, the defensive properties of LEGO are considerable, as including 5%–25% of LEGO in a diversified portfolio is beneficial for investors with varying levels of risk aversion. LEGO secondary market is relatively internationalised, with investors from larger economies, countries with higher per capita incomes and less income inequality are shown to trade LEGO more actively.

Practical implications

LEGO investors derive non-pecuniary utility that is separable from their risk-return profile. LEGO is not exposed to any of the Fama-French factors, however, set-specific size and value effects are also well-pronounced on the LEGO market, with smaller sets and sets with lower price-to-piece ratio exhibiting higher yields. Older sets are also enjoying higher returns, demonstrating a liquidity effect.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the investment properties of LEGO as an alternative asset class from micro- and macro-financial perspectives that overcomes many survivorship bias limitations prevalent in earlier research. LEGO trading is shown to be an important source of valuable data to enable original robustness checks for prominent theoretical concepts from asset pricing and behavioural finance literature.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Miriam Sosa, Edgar Ortiz and Alejandra Cabello

One important characteristic of cryptocurrencies has been their high and erratic volatility. To represent this complicated behavior, recent studies have emphasized the use…

Abstract

One important characteristic of cryptocurrencies has been their high and erratic volatility. To represent this complicated behavior, recent studies have emphasized the use of autoregressive models frequently concluding that generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models are the most adequate to overcome the limitations of conventional standard deviation estimates. Some studies have expanded this approach including jumps into the modeling. Following this line of research, and extending previous research, our study analyzes the volatility of Bitcoin employing and comparing some symmetric and asymmetric GARCH model extensions (threshold ARCH (TARCH), exponential GARCH (EGARCH), asymmetric power ARCH (APARCH), component GARCH (CGARCH), and asymmetric component GARCH (ACGARCH)), under two distributions (normal and generalized error). Additionally, because linear GARCH models can produce biased results if the series exhibit structural changes, once the conditional volatility has been modeled, we identify the best fitting GARCH model applying a Markov switching model to test whether Bitcoin volatility evolves according to two different regimes: high volatility and low volatility. The period of study includes daily series from July 16, 2010 (the earliest date available) to January 24, 2019. Findings reveal that EGARCH model under generalized error distribution provides the best fit to model Bitcoin conditional volatility. According to the Markov switching autoregressive (MS-AR) Bitcoin’s conditional volatility displays two regimes: high volatility and low volatility.

Details

Disruptive Innovation in Business and Finance in the Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-381-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Chong Chin Wei, Chong Siong Choy, Gan Geok Chew and Yuen Yee Yen

The purpose of this paper is to study the knowledge‐sharing patterns of undergraduate students in public and private universities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the knowledge‐sharing patterns of undergraduate students in public and private universities.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on students of both the types of universities in Malaysia. Data were analyzed using SPSS.

Findings

Seven important areas have been the focus of this study: the general attitude towards knowledge sharing; preferred sources for study‐related tasks; perceived frequency of knowledge sharing for study‐related tasks; types of information and knowledge shared; preferred channels for knowledge sharing; factors limiting knowledge sharing; and knowledge sharing motivators. The data collected from 423 undergraduate students suggest that there are differences between the students in the public and private universities when it comes to knowledge sharing patterns.

Research limitations/implications

The paper serves more as a descriptive study on the knowledge sharing patterns rather than a correlational study to find the relationship among variables.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that group activities should be structured in all curricula in order to encourage sharing among students. Academics are expected to play an important role to encourage their students to share by means of putting emphasis on collaborative learning to reduce competition among students. The management of universities can promote knowledge sharing by understanding the barriers and motivators of knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to compare the knowledge sharing patterns among private and public undergraduate students in Malaysia.

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Muhammad Sabbir Rahman, Abdul Highe Khan, Md. Mahabub Alam, Norizah Mustamil and Chin Wei Chong

– The aim of this inquiry is to uncover the pattern of knowledge-sharing behaviour among the undergraduate and postgraduate students of private universities in Bangladesh.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this inquiry is to uncover the pattern of knowledge-sharing behaviour among the undergraduate and postgraduate students of private universities in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This inquiry studied the knowledge-sharing pattern of undergraduate and graduate students by utilising a questionnaire-based open-ended survey from several private universities in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Apart from the descriptive statistics, the research used t-test to further explain the data.

Findings

This research focussed on seven areas of knowledge-sharing pattern. The data collected from 350 respondents from different private universities suggest that there are significant differences in the knowledge-sharing pattern between undergraduate and graduate students. Overall, this research documents that the postgraduate students have shown higher perceived attitudes towards knowledge sharing, compared to undergraduate students.

Research limitations/implications

This research applied a descriptive study to understand knowledge-sharing patterns among undergraduate and postgraduate students, rather than a correlational study to ascertain the relationship among variables.

Practical implications

This research has contributed to the knowledge-sharing research in several aspects. In fact, this study extended the research findings of Wei et al. (2012) by examining the patterns of knowledge sharing in a different socioeconomic environment. Although this research investigated the practice of knowledge sharing of undergraduate and postgraduate students by adapting the instrument of Wei et al. (2012), one of the significant contributions of this research is to explore the behavioural aspects of knowledge-sharing pattern among undergraduate and postgraduate students from different private universities in Bangladesh. By interpreting the knowledge-sharing pattern of undergraduate and postgraduate students of private universities, this inquiry will assist the government’s policymakers, management of individual universities and academicians to come up with novel methods of instruction and to transform the knowledge-driven higher learning establishment.

Originality/value

The majority of studies on knowledge sharing have been conducted in an organisational context. This inquiry is one of few investigations to compare the knowledge-sharing patterns among undergraduate and postgraduate students in Bangladesh.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Lugkana Worasinchai, Vincent M. Ribière and Aurilla Aurélie Bechina Arntzen

This paper aims to present a general framework for fostering research collaboration and knowledge flow between university and industry in Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a general framework for fostering research collaboration and knowledge flow between university and industry in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

With the aim of comprehending complex interactions of the university‐industry (U‐I) linkage, the adopted research methodology for collecting data is based on a combination of various approaches, such as qualitative methods encompassing in‐depth interviews, researcher participations and various documents analysis.

Findings

A framework (Government, University, Industry and Networks: G‐U‐I‐N) was developed encompassing the main factors that could make U‐I relationships more successful in Thailand. Knowledge management is an important enabler of this framework.

Originality/value

This paper presents the various elements (enablers) necessary for an emerging country, such as Thailand, to establish or strengthen successful collaboration and research projects between universities and industries in order to remain competitive.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Mengsteab Tesfayohannes

Properly nurtured and financially supported independent industrial R&D institutions (IRDIs) can play a pivotal role in converting knowledge into commercially exploitable…

Abstract

Purpose

Properly nurtured and financially supported independent industrial R&D institutions (IRDIs) can play a pivotal role in converting knowledge into commercially exploitable applications in manufacturing industries particularly in the small and medium ones. The purpose of this paper is to present various evidence to enhance government awareness that Canadian R&D funding agenda should be streamlined as the way to strengthen the outreach capacity of Canadian IRDIs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a variety of evidence, the position and role of IRDIs in Germany, Japan, the USA and Canada are highlighted. This is done to reveal the current position and outreach of IRDIs in each country and through that to recommend helpful strategies to strengthen the Canadian IRDIs and foster their contribution to the manufacturing technology development.

Findings

The study revealed the weak position of Canadian IRDIs in comparison with their counterparts in the USA, Japan and Germany. The paper proposed strategies and approaches on how IRDIs should be financially and technically supported to expand their outreach in the Canadian manufacturing sector.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides secondary data‐based evidence intended to serve as a background for more focused case supported future research.

Practical implications

Stakeholders at both government and industrial sectors may find the recommendations given in the paper as helpful inputs for formulating suitable policies and strategies in this area.

Originality/value

The paper presents vital background information on the important but neglected role of IRDIs in the application and commercialization of knowledge in manufacturing technology and the need to strengthen their position by granting the necessary financial assistance.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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