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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Marzenna Cichosz, Carl Marcus Wallenburg and A. Michael Knemeyer

The rapid advancement of digital technologies has fundamentally changed the competitive dynamics of the logistics service industry and forced incumbent logistics service…

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9426

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid advancement of digital technologies has fundamentally changed the competitive dynamics of the logistics service industry and forced incumbent logistics service providers (LSPs) to digitalize. As many LSPs still struggle in advancing their digital transformation (DT), the purpose of this study is to discover barriers and identify organizational elements and associated leading practices for DT success at LSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a two-stage approach. Stage 1 is devoted to a literature review. Stage 2, based on multiple case studies, analyzes information collected across nine international and global LSPs.

Findings

This research derives a practice-based definition of DT in the logistics service industry, and it has identified five barriers, eight success factors and associated leading practices for DT. The main obstacles LSPs struggle with, are the complexity of the logistics network and lack of resources, while the main success factor is a leader having and executing a DT vision, and creating a supportive organizational culture.

Practical implications

The results contribute to the emerging field of DT within the logistics and supply chain management literature and provide insights for practitioners regarding how to effectively implement it in a complex industry.

Originality/value

The authors analyze DT from the perspective of LSPs, traditionally not viewed as innovative companies. This study compares their DT with that of other companies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Adriana Rossiter Hofer, Yao Henry Jin and A. Michael Knemeyer

This study follows the tenets of the resource dependence theory (RDT) to investigate the effects of four dimensions of industry-level environmental uncertainty …

Abstract

Purpose

This study follows the tenets of the resource dependence theory (RDT) to investigate the effects of four dimensions of industry-level environmental uncertainty – munificence, dynamism, complexity and innovative intensity – on a shipper's cross-buying (i.e. outsourcing across multiple service categories) in logistics outsourcing arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

Negative binomial regression was used to test the hypotheses with a sample of US manufacturers. Measures were developed through information acquired from a proprietary database of 3PL companies obtained through Armstrong and Associates, Inc. and publicly available industry measures from the US Manufacturing Census and Compustat.

Findings

The findings indicate that individual dimensions of environmental uncertainty exhibit distinct influences on shippers' cross-buying in their logistics outsourcing arrangements. Specifically, the growth and initial innovative intensity of shippers' industries lead to an increased number of logistics service categories outsourced to 3PLs, while industry dynamism and exceptionally high innovative intensity drive the opposite effect.

Practical implications

These findings provide valuable guidance to 3PLs with respect to decisions related to the acquisition of specialized transportation, storage, information systems and personnel assets to serve specific industries. The findings highlight industry conditions that are more likely to lead shippers to outsource across a wider array of logistics service categories and, as a result, potentially yield higher customer retention and profit margins.

Originality/value

While extant 3PL literature posits that shippers' individual strategic orientations and capabilities impact their outsourcing strategy, this study contributes to the literature by providing a theoretical-based empirical examination of the industry-level influencers of such behavior.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Clinton Amos, Sebastian Brockhaus, Amydee M. Fawcett, Stanley E. Fawcett and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how service perceptions influence customer views of the authenticity of corporate sustainability claims. The goal of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how service perceptions influence customer views of the authenticity of corporate sustainability claims. The goal of this paper is to help supply chain decision-makers better understand boundary conditions in order to design more enduring and impactful sustainability programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ behavioral experiments, subjecting two theoretically derived hypotheses to verification across five diverse industries and two distinct sustainability vignettes.

Findings

Customer service perceptions emerge as a significant boundary condition to the perceived authenticity of sustainability efforts. Subjects attributed significantly higher authenticity toward sustainability efforts in above average vs below average service quality contexts. Further, respondents attributed deceptive motivations to sustainability efforts at companies with below average service.

Research limitations/implications

The authors confirm the underlying tenet of social judgment theory, which suggests that a priori perceptions create a zone of acceptability or rejection. Ultimately, investing in sustainability can lead to counterproductive cynicism.

Practical implications

The authors infer that customers’ willingness to give companies credit for sustainability initiatives extends beyond service issues to any practice that influences a priori perceptions. Supply chain managers must rethink their role in designing both customer service and sustainability systems to achieve positive returns from sustainability investments.

Originality/value

The authors challenge the assumption that customers universally positively view sustainability efforts. If customers hold a priori negative service perceptions, otherwise well-designed sustainability programs may invoke cynical reactions. Thus, sustainability programs may not inoculate firm reputations from adverse incidents. Given they touch both service and sustainability systems, supply chain managers are positioned to holistically influence their design for competitive advantage.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Daniel Taylor, Sebastian Brockhaus, A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul Murphy

Since the emergence of e-commerce uprooted traditional brick-and-mortar retail in the early 2000s, many retailers have reacted by first independently servicing both the…

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2086

Abstract

Purpose

Since the emergence of e-commerce uprooted traditional brick-and-mortar retail in the early 2000s, many retailers have reacted by first independently servicing both the online and in-store channels (multichannel retailing) and subsequently integrating both channels to provide a seamless front-end customer interface (omnichannel retailing). Accordingly, firms had to adjust their logistics and supply chain management (SCM) processes from fulfilling orders for each channel separately to integrating channels on the back-end (omnichannel fulfillment). This development is mirrored by an emerging stream of academic publications. The purpose of this paper is to provide a snapshot of the current state of omnichannel fulfillment research via a systematic literature review (SLR) in order to identify omnichannel fulfillment strategies and to establish an agenda for future inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

This SLR is based on 104 papers published in peer-reviewed journals through December 2018. It employs a six-step process, from research question to the presentation of the insights.

Findings

All selected manuscripts are categorized based on demographics such as publication date, outlet, methodology, etc. Analysis of the manuscripts suggests that the integration of fulfillment channel inventory and resources is becoming an important objective of fulfillment management. Appropriate omnichannel strategies based on retailer attributes are not well understood. Industry specific research has been conducted necessitating generalized extension for retailers. These findings provide a clear opportunity for the academic community to take more of the lead in terms of knowledge creation by proposing paths for industry pursuit of channel integration to successfully implement omnichannel fulfillment. Opportunities for future inquiry are highlighted.

Originality/value

This manuscript proposes a definition of omnichannel fulfillment strategies and identifies fulfillment links that are used interchangeably across channels as the key delimiter between omnichannel fulfillment strategies and related concepts. Six omnichannel fulfillment strategies from the extant literature are identified and conceptualized. Future research opportunities around omnichannel fulfillment, potential interdependencies between the established strategies and their impact on related SCM issues such as distribution and reverse logistics are detailed.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Sebastian Brockhaus, Moritz Petersen and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to explore how big-picture sustainability strategies are translated into tangible product development efforts. The authors assert that most…

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1136

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how big-picture sustainability strategies are translated into tangible product development efforts. The authors assert that most sustainable products currently remain confined to niche markets and do not permeate the mainstream. The authors propose that there is a missing link between strategic sustainability goals and operational product development initiatives. The authors establish a path to bridging this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The manuscript is based on a qualitative research design with a sample of 32 companies. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with product developers as well as secondary data analysis.

Findings

The authors delineate three empirically derived approaches firms from the sample pursue to develop sustainable products. The authors identify a phenomenon that the authors’ call the fallacy of trickle-down product sustainability. The authors find that only one of the three approaches – codification – is equipped to successfully turn strategic sustainability targets into authentic sustainable products.

Practical implications

This study provides an actionable guide to executives and product developers with respect to bridging the gap between often elusive sustainability aspirations and tangible product improvements via the process of rigorous codification.

Originality/value

This study provides a novel and unique perspective into strategy, sustainability and product development. The authors synthesize the extant literature on sustainable product development, juxtapose the emergent structure with primary interview data, and elaborate the resource-based view (RBV) to provide theoretical and practical implications. The authors establish scalability as the missing RBV capability of many attempts toward mass–market compatibility of more sustainable products.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Mikaella Polyviou, Keely L. Croxton and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to explore resources or capabilities that enable medium-sized firms to be resilient, namely, to avoid and recover from supply chain disruptions.

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2130

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore resources or capabilities that enable medium-sized firms to be resilient, namely, to avoid and recover from supply chain disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-study method is employed with four medium-sized manufacturing firms headquartered in the USA that have global supply chains. Data are collected from semi-structured interviews with key informants from diverse functions and managerial levels, archival documents, observation and a resilience assessment.

Findings

Internal social capital emerged as a resilience-enhancing resource, comprising: structural capital grounded in small network size, geographical proximity among decision makers and low hierarchy; relational capital grounded in close relationships, commitment and respect; and cognitive capital grounded in long employee tenure.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in the supply chain management literature to examine the resilience of medium-sized firms, an under-researched context. It is also the first paper to introduce internal social capital as a resilience-enhancing resource. Hence, this is among the few papers to propose a resilience-enhancing resource rooted not in a firm’s supply chain operations but its human resources. This paper, moreover, identifies several facets of internal social capital within medium-sized firms. Finally, the paper makes several managerial contributions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul R. Murphy

Despite the increased importance and corporate visibility of logistics – and its concomitant opportunities – the demand for college educated entry‐level logisticians…

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1860

Abstract

Despite the increased importance and corporate visibility of logistics – and its concomitant opportunities – the demand for college educated entry‐level logisticians continues to greatly exceed their supply. The current study, which responds to this persistent shortfall of talented students, was designed to investigate three primary issues: student familiarity with logistics vis‐à‐vis other business disciplines; student perceptions of logistics in terms of academic and career issues; and the potential impact of promoting the value of logistics in a “principles of marketing” course. The findings suggest that students are relatively unfamiliar with logistics as a career choice and have a distinct level of neutrality towards many of the key “selling” points of the discipline. However, the findings also suggest that a focus on promoting the value of logistics in a “principles of marketing” course can have a significant impact on these perceptions. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for various logistics constituencies along with suggestions for future research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Marc Winter and A. Michael Knemeyer

The aim of this paper is to provide a snapshot of the existing research and suggest potential opportunities for academic inquiry related to the concept of sustainable…

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11211

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide a snapshot of the existing research and suggest potential opportunities for academic inquiry related to the concept of sustainable supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers review the extant literature at the intersection of “sustainability” and “supply chain management”. This literature is subsequently categorized with the aid of a classification matrix derived from the literature in order to review the current state of thought development across three distinct disciplines (logistics/supply chain management, operations/production management and social/environmental management). The analysis suggests future research opportunities in this area.

Findings

The findings indicate that the existing literature is primarily focused on individual sustainability and supply chain dimensions rather than taking a more integrated approach. In addition, the findings suggest both the emergence of a group of themes within an individual dimension, such as green logistics within the environmental dimension as well as a set of themes that are consistent across dimensions. The analysis establishes several areas of opportunity for future inquiry.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our knowledge on sustainability as it relates to supply chain management by using the triple bottom line approach and supply chain management elements that had been previously established in literature as a means to classify extant literature in this space and identify specific research opportunities in a systematic manner.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul R. Murphy

Internships are an increasingly essential component of the educational preparation for the contemporary logistics major, and are often viewed as a “win‐win” situation for…

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6005

Abstract

Internships are an increasingly essential component of the educational preparation for the contemporary logistics major, and are often viewed as a “win‐win” situation for both the intern and their employer(s). Despite their growing importance, there has been limited discussion of logistics internships in either the practitioner or academic literature. In an effort to address part of this literature void, reports findings from surveys of students and employers with a particular focus on their differences concerning selected internship issues. Also discusses potential implications of the findings for various logistical constituencies.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Carl Marcus Wallenburg, David L. Cahill, Thomas J. Goldsby and A. Michael Knemeyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine how goal achievement and goal exceedance influence the aspects of loyalty in logistics outsourcing relationships. Specifically, it…

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3158

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how goal achievement and goal exceedance influence the aspects of loyalty in logistics outsourcing relationships. Specifically, it aims to develop and test a model of customer loyalty across two cultures to determine if dedicated strategies for building loyalty are required.

Design/methodology/approach

This effort develops a conceptual model that provides a better understanding of the relationship between two dimensions of logistics outsourcing performance (goal achievement and goal exceedance) to loyalty across cultures. The model is then tested using structural equation modeling along with multi‐group analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that goal achievement strongly influences the loyalty aspects of retention and referrals, but not extension. Meanwhile, all three dimensions of loyalty were influenced by goal exceedance of the logistics provider. Further, goal achievement was found to have a stronger effect on retention only, with goal exceedance demonstrating a stronger influence on extension and referrals. In addition, cultural differences in the model were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine more transactional settings as well as other potential moderators that may be consequential to the examination of loyalty formation.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that logistics service providers (LSPs) need to have an appreciation for the differences between goal achievement and goal exceedance as it relates to loyalty formation. In addition, LSPs need to adapt their performance goals based on cultural differences that may exist across their markets.

Originality/value

The close examination of the two dimensions of outsourcing performance on three aspects of loyalty behavior builds on the extant literature. The examination across the two national settings provides yet another contribution of the study.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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