Search results

1 – 10 of 240
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Hakan Akillioglu, Joao Ferreira and Mauro Onori

Evolvable production systems enable fully reconfiguration capabilities on the shop floor through process‐oriented modularity and multi‐agent‐based distributed control. To…

Abstract

Purpose

Evolvable production systems enable fully reconfiguration capabilities on the shop floor through process‐oriented modularity and multi‐agent‐based distributed control. To be able to benefit architectural and operational characteristics of evolvable systems, there is a need of a new planning approach which links shop floor characteristics and planning operations. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Evolvable production system has a structured methodology in itself. Consistent to this, a reference planning architecture is developed aiming to achieve agility on planning activities. Besides a workload control method is proposed and implemented as a part of the planning architecture.

Findings

First applications of evolvable systems have been implemented through European research projects. Shop floor working principles and architectural characteristics are consistent to facilitate more agility on planning activities which are framed at a planning reference architecture called demand responsive planning. As an implementation case, an agent‐based workload control method is proposed and implemented. The characteristics of EPS and proposed planning architecture enable continuous and dynamic workload control of the shop floor to be implemented.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new planning model compatible with evolvable production systems targeting to agility to demand on planning and control activities benefiting shop floor enhancements of a fully reconfigurable system which enables to relax constraints imposed from production systems to planning. In addition, a continuous and dynamic workload control method is proposed and implemented.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1961

Lubrication of vertical spindle bearings of hydro‐extractors presents lubrication problems in order to ensure maximum operating efficiency, reduced maintenance and long…

Abstract

Lubrication of vertical spindle bearings of hydro‐extractors presents lubrication problems in order to ensure maximum operating efficiency, reduced maintenance and long bearing life. This is especially true of hydro‐extractors for laundry use in view of the different conditions associated with wet and partially dry materials.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Mahmood Reza Khabbazi, Jan Wikander, Mauro Onori and Antonio Maffei

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces a schema for the product assembly feature data in an object-oriented and module-based format using Unified Modeling Language (UML). To link production with product design, it is essential to determine at an early stage which entities of product design and development are involved and used at the automated assembly planning and operations. To this end, it is absolutely reasonable to assign meaningful attributes to the parts’ design entities (assembly features) in a systematic and structured way. As such, this approach empowers processes such as motion planning and sequence planning in assembly design.

Design/methodology/approach

The assembly feature data requirements are studied and definitions are analyzed and redefined. Using object-oriented techniques, the assembly feature data structure and relationships are modeled based on the identified requirements as five UML packages (Part, three-dimensional (3D) models, Mating, Joint and Handling). All geometric and non-geometric design data entities endorsed with assembly design perspective are extracted or assigned from 3D models and realized through the featured entity interface class. The featured entities are then associated (used) with the mating, handling and joints features. The AssemblyFeature interface is realized through mating, handling and joint packages related to the assembly and part classes. Each package contains all relevant classes which further classify the important attributes of the main class.

Findings

This paper sets out to provide an explanatory approach using object-oriented techniques to model the schema of assembly features association and artifacts at the product design level, all of which are essential in several subsequent and parallel steps of the assembly planning process, as well as assembly feature entity assignments in design improvement cycle.

Practical implications

The practical implication based on the identified advantages can be classified in three main features: module-based design, comprehensive classification, integration. These features help the automation and solution development processes based on the proposed models much easier and systematic.

Originality/value

The proposed schema’s comprehensiveness and reliability are verified through comparisons with other works and the advantages are discussed in detail.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Luca Ferri, Rosanna Spanò, Marco Maffei and Clelia Fiondella

This paper aims to investigate the factors influencing chief executive officers’ (CEOs') intentions to implement cloud technology in Italian small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the factors influencing chief executive officers’ (CEOs') intentions to implement cloud technology in Italian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a model that integrates the theoretical construct of the technology acceptance model (TAM) with a classification of perceived benefits and risks related to cloud computing. The study employs a structural equation modeling approach to analyze data gathered through a Likert scale-based survey.

Findings

The findings indicate that risk perception has a strong negative effect on the intention to introduce cloud technology in firms. This effect is partially offset by the perceived ease of use of the technology.

Originality/value

The study provides a new theoretical framework that integrates the TAM and a classification of perceived risks to provide a clear view of management's cognitive processes during technological change. Moreover, the results show the main factors influencing decisions regarding the implementation of cloud computing in firms in light of the perception of risks. Finally, this study provides interesting findings for cloud service providers (CSPs) about their customers' decision-making processes.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

Giant fan blades weighing approximately 500lbs each are being built by Permali Gloucester Ltd for use in a NASA wind tunnel in the USA.

Abstract

Giant fan blades weighing approximately 500lbs each are being built by Permali Gloucester Ltd for use in a NASA wind tunnel in the USA.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 59 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Abstract

Details

Enterprise Risk Management in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-245-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Mauro Onori, Niels Lohse, Jose Barata and Christoph Hanisch

Current major roadmapping efforts have all clearly underlined that true industrial sustainability will require far higher levels of systems' autonomy and adaptability. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Current major roadmapping efforts have all clearly underlined that true industrial sustainability will require far higher levels of systems' autonomy and adaptability. In accordance with these recommendations, the Evolvable Assembly Systems (EAS) has aimed at developing such technological solutions and support mechanisms. Since its inception in 2002 as a next generation of production systems, the concept is being further developed and tested to emerge as a production system paradigm. The essence of evolvability resides not only in the ability of system components to adapt to the changing conditions of operation, but also to assist in the evolution of these components in time. Characteristically, Evolvable systems have distributed control, and are composed of intelligent modules with embedded control. To assist the development and life cycle, a methodological framework is being developed. After validating the process‐oriented approach (EC FP6 EUPASS project), EAS now tackles its current major challenge (FP7 IDEAS project) in proving that factory responsiveness can be improved using lighter multi‐agent technology running on EAS modules (modules with embedded control). The purpose of this paper is to detail the particular developments within the IDEAS project, which include the first self re‐configuring system demonstration and a new mechatronic architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper covers the development of a plug & produce system for FESTO AG. The work covers the background methodology and details its constituents: control system, architecture, design methodology, and modularity. Specific detail is reserved for the configuration approach which integrates several tools, and the commercially available control boards. The latter have been specifically developed for distributed control applications.

Findings

The paper details probably the first self‐configuring assembly system at shop‐floor level. This is one of the very first industrial plug & produce systems, in which equipment may be added/removed with no programming effort at all.

Research limitations/implications

The paper reports the findings and development carried out within the framework of a single project. It also clarifies that the solution is not a general panacea for all the issues within assembly.

Practical implications

The implications are quite large as the work proves the validity of an approach that could change our way of designing and building assembly systems. In the words of an industrial partner, this is “a new way of engineering assembly systems”.

Social implications

Should this approach be used in industry then the implications could be huge. It would, for example, mean that new services are created, whereby assembly system modules are leased to users through a network of depots, rather than bought at a high cost. The system modules also have a far longer lifespan, implying very good ecological solutions.

Originality/value

The highly original paper describes what is probably one of the very first projects to show that distributed control at shop‐floor level is viable and technologically feasible.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Clelia Fiondella and Claudia Zagaria

In this chapter, we address the operationalization of the enterprise risk management (ERM) system in Italy. We first present some Italian economic highlights emphasizing…

Abstract

In this chapter, we address the operationalization of the enterprise risk management (ERM) system in Italy. We first present some Italian economic highlights emphasizing the uncertainty characterizing the domestic development, and we focus on the recent changes in domestic regulation which are related to the concept of risk. Then, we examine the degree of knowledge of ERM in the academic arena and the role of professional bodies in this field, focusing on if and how ERM principles are embedded within organizations and effectively integrated into their practices. On the basis of the evidence from questionnaires collected from risk professionals working in prominent Italian firms, who are involved in different ways in the ERM process, we provide some concluding considerations about the degree of integration of ERM practices with governance mechanisms, accounting practices and disclosure in annual reports.

Details

Enterprise Risk Management in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-245-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

D. Semere, M. Onori, A. Maffei and R. Adamietz

The main features of evolvable systems include distributed control, a modularized, intelligent and open architecture, a comprehensive and multi‐dimensional methodological…

Abstract

Purpose

The main features of evolvable systems include distributed control, a modularized, intelligent and open architecture, a comprehensive and multi‐dimensional methodological support that comprises the reference architecture. Furthermore, integration of legacy subsystems and modules has been addressed in the methodology. This paper aims to present the latest developments, applications and conclusions drawn to date.

Design/methodology/approach

Evolvable assembly system is a new methodology in itself, and is currently being applied within several European projects. Evolvable assembly goes beyond reconfigurability and offers continuous evolution of the system.

Findings

The work has been, and is being, implemented through large European research projects. Evolvability, being a system concept, is envisaged addressing every aspect of an assembly system throughout its life cycle, i.e. design and development, operation and evolution.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents the latest developments, applications and conclusions drawn to date.

Originality/value

The paper presents the methodology and the latest application of it, which is industrial. This is the first application that offers self‐configuration of the equipment.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Marco Maffei, Massimo Aria, Clelia Fiondella, Rosanna Spanò and Claudia Zagaria

The purpose of this paper is to better understand how mandatory risk categories are disclosed and to provide a better understanding of the reasons why risk disclosure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand how mandatory risk categories are disclosed and to provide a better understanding of the reasons why risk disclosure looks less useful than it ought to be.

Design/methodology/approach

We analyze how Italian banks provide risk information, by focusing on its characteristics to find out any differences between the notes to the financial statements and the public report, both prepared in compliance with the instructions of the Bank of Italy. We assess the risk-related reporting practices of 66 Italian banks, based on a content analysis of the two mandatory reports, and verify whether bank-specific factors explain any differences.

Findings

Italian banks formally comply with the Bank of Italy’s instructions, but there is discretion to choose the characteristics of the information provided. Despite different risk categories to disclose in each report, disclosure is quite uniform, although banks tend to provide denser information in the notes to the financial statements and the difference in the economic signs between the two reports decreases as the level of risk increases.

Practical implications

The significance of this study goes beyond the debate taking place in the academic arena, as it can be largely relevant for preparers, those responsible for setting international and national accounting standards, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and the domestic supervisory authorities, particularly concerning the possible introduction of requirements that are more explicit than the existing ones.

Originality/value

The Italian setting is very relevant because unlike other countries, Italy adopts “interventionist enforcements”, which are regarded as a critical tool for achieving the minimum disclosure requirements. Moreover, the two sets of disclosure required by the Bank of Italy have never been investigated in a single data set.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

1 – 10 of 240