Search results

1 – 10 of 296
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Ciaran B. Trace and Yan Zhang

The purpose of this article is to examine the ways in which self-tracking data have meaning and value in and after the life of the creator, including how such data could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the ways in which self-tracking data have meaning and value in and after the life of the creator, including how such data could become part of the larger historical record, curated in an institutional archive. In doing so, the article expands upon existing shared interests among researchers working in the areas of self-tracking, human–computer interaction and archival science.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 18 people who had self-tracked for six months or more were recruited for the study. Participants completed a survey which gathered demographic data and characteristics vis-à-vis their self-tracking behavior. In-person semi-structured interviews were then conducted to ascertain the beliefs of the participants regarding the long-term use and value of personal quantified-self data.

Findings

The findings reveal the value that people place on self-tracking data, their thoughts on proper modes for accessing their archive once it moves from the private to the public space, and how to provide fidelity within the system such that their experiences are represented while also enabling meaning making on the part of subsequent users of the archive.

Originality/value

Today’s quantified-self data are generally embedded in systems that create a pipeline from the individual source to that of the corporate warehouse, bent on absorbing and extracting insight from a totality of big data. This article posits that new opportunities for knowing and for design can be revealed when a public interest rationale is appended to rich personalized collections of small data.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

S. Michael Malinconico

Abstract

Details

Program, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Paula Nottingham and Adesola Akinleye

The purpose of this paper is to present and examine the addition of a “professional artefact” to the course requirements for the BA Honours Professional Practice (BAPP…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and examine the addition of a “professional artefact” to the course requirements for the BA Honours Professional Practice (BAPP) (Arts) programme at Middlesex University.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a case study approach using reflection, indicative theories and consideration of student work to evaluate the introduction of the “professional artefact” into the BAPP (Arts) curriculum. Following pragmatist and phenomenological descriptions of the lived experience as embodied (Dewey et al., 1989; Merleau-Ponty, 2002) and using learning models based on experience in the workplace (Boud and Garrick, 1999), the paper's methodology takes the work-based principle of “experience as knowledge” to examine the impact of the professional artefact on students learning.

Findings

The professional artefact has proven to be a useful way for the learners on the course to reflect on the purpose of their own study and the ways in which work-based learning can be incorporated into their practice through embodied “ideas”.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the inclusion of a professional artefact to the curriculum provides a flexible means for bridging academic and workplace learning. The inclusion of the professional artefact could be recommended as a strategy for other work-based learning programmes.

Originality/value

The added value for professional practice is that the professional artefact provides a flexible and creative means of communication for emerging and establishing workplace professionals.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Barbara A. Workman

The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the higher education learning and teaching development strategies used to implement a university‐wide project to extend and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the higher education learning and teaching development strategies used to implement a university‐wide project to extend and embed work‐based learning (WBL) across all four university schools as part of a Centre for Excellence project in Teaching and Learning (CETL).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the change and engagement strategies that were used and gives a flavour of the range of activities that were undertaken to integrate different modes of WBL into all the university schools. Different change approaches are considered in relation to how WBL pedagogies were adopted in different subject disciplines and are examples of approaches to introducing WBL into subject areas not previously involved. Factors which facilitated the embedding of WBL into subject disciplines will be considered in relation to the implications for future higher educational development projects. These factors include support and involvement at senior management level, the use of demonstrator projects within distinct areas as illustrations of good practice, and funding support from the Centre for Excellence for projects.

Findings

Effective embedding of WBL requires high‐level champions as well as innovators and risk takers who are educational developers to apply the change approaches within their own discipline in order to bring about change. Funding of educational evaluations and small projects encouraged engagement of educational developers.

Practical implications

Undertaking change in a higher education institution needs to consider the type of institution and the opportunities that present themselves through university policies and personal and professional networks, and to capitalise on the opportunities that are offered. Additionally, the use of funds and other inducements can ease reluctance to engage, and modelling of successful outcomes encourages further engagement.

Originality/value

This CETL was unusual in that it was pan‐university and endeavoured to share good practice and embed WBL across all subject disciplines. The paper demonstrates a range of change strategies that were used and offers practical examples of effective ways of involving a university in WBL.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jonathan Garnett

The purpose of this paper is to show how transdisciplinarity is woven into the key curriculum components of individually negotiated work-based learning (WBL) programmes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how transdisciplinarity is woven into the key curriculum components of individually negotiated work-based learning (WBL) programmes and to focus upon the performative value of knowledge in the work context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon WBL academic literature and the authors 22 years operational experience of WBL.

Findings

The paper suggests that while university-level WBL can enhance the performance of organizations and individuals it is also inherently challenging and challenged by the hegemony of subject disciplines and disciplinary-based university structures. WBL is concerned with knowledge which is often unsystematic, socially constructed and is action focused in order to achieve outcomes of significance to work. This contests the supremacy of the role of the university in curriculum design, delivery and validation of knowledge and means that work-based knowledge is often seen as transdisciplinary rather than conforming to traditional subject disciplines (Boud and Solomon, 2001).

Research limitations/implications

Central to the distinctive nature of university WBL programmes is the role of the external organization as a partner with the university and the individual learner in the planning of learning activities which are intended to have significance for the workplace. For individual knowledge to become organizational knowledge, and thus fully contribute to the intellectual capital of the organization, it must be shared and accepted by others. It follows that a key concern for organizations must be the facilitation of the recognition of knowledge and this goes beyond using a transdisciplinary lens when guiding and assessing the work of individual higher education students.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for the design and facilitation of WBL programmes at higher education level.

Originality/value

Provides an informed and sustained examination of the concept of WBL and knowledge.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Jonathan Garnett, Selva Abraham and Param Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws organisational learning- and work-based learning literature and case study illustrations.

Findings

To achieve major strategic change in organisations requires working at senior level within the organisation to develop the capability of the organisation to learn and apply that learning strategically. WAL is explicitly geared to bring about change and enhance the learning capability within the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further longitudinal studies of organisations that have used the work-based and WAL approaches.

Practical implications

The conclusions reached have implications for higher education and non-award bearing executive education.

Social implications

The alignment of individual learning with organisational objectives positions learning as a co-operative part of working life rather than just individual preparation for employment.

Originality/value

The paper positions work-based learning and WAL as appropriate responses to the learning needs of organisations as well as individuals.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2020

Bryanna Fox, Lauren N. Miley, Scott Allen, Jordan Boness, Cassandra Dodge, Norair Khachatryan, MacKenzie Lyle, Sean McKinley, Jeff Peake and Maria Rozo

The purpose of this study is to outline the specific details and lessons learned during a cold case collaborative effort, which granted graduate students and a professor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to outline the specific details and lessons learned during a cold case collaborative effort, which granted graduate students and a professor from the University of South Florida the opportunity to assist Pasco Sheriff’s Office in the investigation of a cold case homicide.

Methodology

The collaboration between law enforcement and academics is a new and emerging strategy to investigate cold cases and identify the elusive offenders who committed these crimes. Such collaboration aids law enforcement by obtaining a force multiplier for investigative resources, accessing cutting-edge evidence-based research and cultivating innovative approaches to their work. For academics, such collaboration allows the unique opportunity to engage in translational criminology, which is an important and increasingly encouraged aspect of the field.

Findings

In this paper, the authors provide an overview of the process used to study this cold case as part of an experiential academic course, provide evidence-based research findings relevant to cold case investigations and outline the steps for others to replicate the efforts.

Originality/value

The authors describe in detail the process used to “work” the cold case, academic research that the authors found useful in understanding and investigating cold cases, important lessons learned and advice for future academics and practitioners who undertake an incredible collaborative effort such as this.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Tricia Handley

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Durrant’s paper “Factors influencing the quality of care learning disabled patients receive in hospital”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Durrant’s paper “Factors influencing the quality of care learning disabled patients receive in hospital”.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary identifies examples of practice in acute hospital provision consistent with the themes outlined in Durrant’s paper.

Findings

The themes identified in Durrant’s paper are easily recognisable. At the same time, there is a need to more fully understand the complexity of acute hospitals and to involve mainstream health-care staff in development and delivery of training on learning disability. Consideration should be given to the development of new specialist roles.

Originality/value

The commentary provides a practice perspective arising from wide clinical experience.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Alice Durrant

In total, 40% of the deaths of patients with learning disabilities have been classed as avoidable, and there is a known increased risk of harm while inpatients in…

Abstract

Purpose

In total, 40% of the deaths of patients with learning disabilities have been classed as avoidable, and there is a known increased risk of harm while inpatients in hospital. This paper aims to look at the current experiences and treatment of people with learning disabilities within a general hospital setting to examine factors that affect their care.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature search was conducted of primary research between 2013 and 2019 to evaluate what is known about the quality of care and treatment that learning disabled patients experience within a general hospital.

Findings

The research suggests that people with learning disabilities receive haphazard care in hospital settings, with inconsistent implementation of reasonable adjustments, insufficient arrangements to support family and other carer input, and poor knowledge of learning disability amongst hospital staff.

Originality/value

Previously, reviews focussing on hospital care have mainly focussed on access to health care rather than its delivery. This review has found evidence of significant failings in delivering care to this patient group, identifying a gap of knowledge in this field regardless of policies and laws already in place. There should be stricter monitoring of the Equality Act’s enforcement, along with improved and mandatory training for all general health-care staff. It is crucial that health-care professionals learn from mistakes to improve the care and experiences of learning disabled inpatients.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Jacqueline Chelin

The purpose of this paper is to disseminate information about the development of a work‐based learning (WBL) honours degree top‐up in Library and Information Sciences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disseminate information about the development of a work‐based learning (WBL) honours degree top‐up in Library and Information Sciences (LIS), focusing on the motivation for this development.

Design/methodology/approach

The context for the work is explained. The characteristics of work‐based learning (WBL) are explored in terms of the relevance to LIS learning and teaching. The rationale for the development of the WBL top‐up is proposed and considerations that need to be borne in mind in the implementation are offered.

Findings

A synergy between the ethos of the existing approach to the education and development of LIS students at the University of the West of England and that of WBL was discovered.

Practical implications

There are implications for the training and development of teaching staff to engage fully and excel in a WBL approach, and for the institution to support this approach. There are also implications for advising employers and potential learners as to the benefits of WBL, and to ensure that it fits appropriately into the professional framework.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is in the sharing of an approach to developing a positive new way of working, how this fits with different government, local and professional agendas and the implications it has for all concerned.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 296