Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Annmarie Nicely, Radesh Palakurthi and A. Denise Gooden

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to…

1642

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to determine whether the extent to which managers were intrinsically motivated to learn, their perceived risk‐taking abilities, their attitudes towards learning and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry could determine their level of individual work‐related learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted on the island of Jamaica. The survey was completed by 154 hotel managers and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Of the four behaviors examined, two predicted the hotel managers' individual work‐related learning levels, i.e. their perceived risk‐taking abilities, and their attitudes towards learning. Managers who reported high work‐related learning levels also reported high risk‐taking abilities and more positive attitudes towards learning. The extent to which they were intrinsically motivated to learn and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry were not significant determinants of their work‐related learning levels.

Research limitations/implications

The exercise had a number of limitations and these should be taken into consideration when reviewing the findings.

Practical implications

The study therefore pointed to two behaviors linked to intense individual learning amongst managers in hotels. Hotel managers wishing to display high levels of work‐related learning should therefore determine the extent to which they possess the behaviors connected and make the adjustments necessary.

Originality/value

The study was one of a small number which examined objectively individual learning in hospitality business.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Denise E. Armstrong and Brenda J. McMahon

This chapter examines the tensions inherent in conceptions of social justice as they relate to educational administrator preparation programs. In order to determine how…

Abstract

This chapter examines the tensions inherent in conceptions of social justice as they relate to educational administrator preparation programs. In order to determine how social justice is conceptualized in K-12 administrator preparation in Ontario, Canada, we conduct a document analysis of publicly available information related to provincial leadership preparation programs. We identify an ideological bias toward managerial and transformational leadership paradigms which favor externally mandated outcomes that unintentionally reinstate hierarchical management paradigms and democratic forms of racism (Henry, Tator, Mattis, & Rees, 2000). Drawing on critical democratic and antiracist literature and our own research and practice, we propose an approach to leadership preparation that can support diversity and transformative praxis while working within a mandated transformational paradigm.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Annmarie Nicely and Raslinda Mohd Ghazali

The purpose of this paper is to use a study conducted on the Caribbean island of Jamaica to make the case that music might be a plausible suppressant of negative visitor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a study conducted on the Caribbean island of Jamaica to make the case that music might be a plausible suppressant of negative visitor harassment (VH). The goal of the study in question was to determine the genres of songs and music likely to have a positive effect on emotions the antithesis of the ones associated with VH but would have positive effect on visitors’ shopping behaviors as well.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method pre-experimental design was used for the study. Forty-two craft traders from a single craft market in Jamaica participated in seven music experiments and the data gathered were analyzed using predominantly paired and independent t-test analyses.

Findings

The researchers found that music likely to result in positive shopper behaviors also resulted in positive trader emotions, in particular in emotions the antithesis of those associated with trader harassment. In addition, the researchers discovered that old non-instrumental local songs had a significantly greater positive effect on these emotions than local contemporary songs and instrumental music.

Originality/value

The study discussed was original as it was the first known that looked at music as a possible treatment for negative VH.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1991

David F. Cheshire, Mike Cornford, Allan Bunch, Edwin Fleming and Tony Joseph

Undoubtedly the most publicised art event during recent months was the long‐awaited opening of the much‐debated extension to the National Gallery. Even when completed the…

Abstract

Undoubtedly the most publicised art event during recent months was the long‐awaited opening of the much‐debated extension to the National Gallery. Even when completed the Sainsbury Wing (named, of course, after the trio of grocers who donated the money for its erection) continued to generate controversy in architectural circles. To the uninvolved visitor the building seems to be enormously successful and the suspicion arises that a lot of adverse comments may have come from British architects disappointed that such a prestigious commission went to an American architect. But Robert Venturi and his principal partner, Denise Scott‐Brown, have cracked what had hitherto been seen as an insoluble problem, with style and vigour. Indeed, thanks to Prince Charles' notorious “carbuncle” intervention the National Gallery has now an extension of a quality not achievable (for a number of economic and aesthetic reasons) since the 1930s. This point is clearly emphasised by the illustrations of the structures previously proposed for the site reproduced in Colin Amery's A Celebration of Art and Architecture: The National Gallery Sainsbury Wing (ISBN 0 9476465 86 1, hardback, £40.00; ISBN 0 947645 87 X, paperback, £15.95). This includes not only a succinct history of the National Gallery and a survey of the various previous proposals for an extension, but also a section on “Construction Details” illustrated by some excellent paintings of work in progress, by Andrew Norris. Some of the paintings around which the Wing was designed are in Amery's book, but more are to be found in Michael Wilson's Guide to the Sainsbury Wing (ISBN 0 947645 94 2, paperback, £4.95). This takes the form of tours around the building and around the contents. These include a very large and elegant shop which has led to the immediate removal of the “temporary” shop from its previous dominating position within the National Gallery; a restaurant which allows the public a view of Trafalgar Square similar to that hitherto only available to users of the library in Canada House; and the Micro Gallery (sponsored by American Express) which brings the very latest touch‐screen computer technology right out to the public. With software developed by Cognitive Applications and editorial material generated by 21st Century Systems, this enables any visitor to search the whole of the National Gallery's catalogue and compile their own study notes. The system even has a facility for the display of explanations of “difficult” words used in the descriptions of the 2,000 painting involved, and, at print‐out time, there is even an explanation for the reasons why copyright restrictions prevent the reproduction of certain pictures. No wonder this facility has proved to be an immensely popular aspect of a building which already looks as though it has always been there.

Details

New Library World, vol. 92 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal…

Abstract

The whole kingdom from north to south at the time of writing is enveloped in freezing Arctic weather, reminiscent of the North Russian campaign of long ago. The normal winter is relatively mild, mainly a Westerly pattern, occasionally wild and windy, wet with a rare cold “snap”. There are variations in the pattern, damp and warm in the south‐west, few frosts and rarely any snow; in the north of the country, Scotland, much colder, with the south‐east partaking of the weather pattern of the land mass of the Continent. The variations appear more of the mild weather in the South and colder, appreciably, in the North; recalling service personnel stationed at Gosport who did not need an overcoat all winter, whereas in the North, many found it necessary to wear a light overcoat tor most of the year, the south‐east corner of England, obtaining no help from the warming Gulf Stream, often gets the worst of the weather, which it has done to a very considerable extent in this winter.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Fevzi Okumus

562

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2018

Ellie Drago-Severson and Jessica Blum-DeStefano

This paper draws from more than 25 years of research with aspiring and practicing educational leaders to present six strategies for building a culture of feedback in…

1315

Abstract

Purpose

This paper draws from more than 25 years of research with aspiring and practicing educational leaders to present six strategies for building a culture of feedback in schools, teams, districts, professional learning opportunities, and other educational settings. These strategies reflect key elements of the authors’ new, developmental approach to feedback. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the lens of adult developmental theory, the authors highlight foundational learnings from open-ended survey research with 14 educational leaders about their experiences giving and receiving feedback, and prior qualitative, mixed-method, and longitudinal research with principals, assistant principals, teachers, superintendents, and other educational leaders.

Findings

The authors share six developmentally oriented strategies for establishing trust and building conditions for authentic, generative feedback: finding value in mistakes, modeling vulnerability, caring for the (inter)personal, clarifying expectations, sharing developmental ideas, and building an infrastructure for collaboration.

Practical implications

This work has implications for leadership and leadership preparation, especially given contemporary emphases on collaboration and high-stakes evaluations as tools for ongoing improvement, enhancing professional capital, and internal, individual, and system-wide capacity building.

Originality/value

Because a developmental perspective has been noticeably missing from the wider feedback literature and leadership preparation curricula, this work extends and enhances tenets from different fields (e.g. business, developmental psychology, educational leadership and educational leadership preparation), while also addressing urgent calls for educational reform; leadership preparation, development, and practice; and professional capital building.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Kenna Cottrill, Patricia Denise Lopez and Calvin C. Hoffman

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of inclusion and related factors, to understand how organizations can encourage and facilitate the full participation…

8325

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of inclusion and related factors, to understand how organizations can encourage and facilitate the full participation of employees. The research explored authentic leadership (AL) as an antecedent of inclusion, and two outcomes, organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey, data were collected from 107 primary and 219 peer participants in various industries throughout the USA. Primary participants provided perceptual ratings on inclusion, AL, OBSE and OCB. Co-workers assessed primary participants’ OCB.

Findings

AL was positively related to inclusion (β=0.58, p<0.01) as well as self-rated OCB (β=0.36, p<0.01). Inclusion was positively associated with OBSE (β=0.48, p<0.01) and self-rated OCB (β=0.63, p<0.01). Inclusion mediated the relationship between AL and self-rated OCB. OBSE mediated the relationship between inclusion and self-rated OCB. All analyses controlled for the effects of race and gender.

Practical implications

Results suggest organizations can promote inclusive environments through AL, and that inclusive environments promote employees’ work-related self-esteem and their willingness to go above and beyond in their jobs.

Originality/value

This paper examines previously unstudied relationships, thus contributing to organizational theory and practice.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8