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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1968

G.L. Wilde and D.J. Pickerell

IT is nearly fifteen years since the introduction into civil operations of the Dart turboprop in the Vickers Viscount and the Ghost turbojet in the dc Havilland Comet. For…

Abstract

IT is nearly fifteen years since the introduction into civil operations of the Dart turboprop in the Vickers Viscount and the Ghost turbojet in the dc Havilland Comet. For many years it was thought that the turboprop would remain dominant in the short and medium haul classes, but the continued demand for higher cruising speeds and the passenger appeal of the jet have been largely responsible for the turboprop aircraft being superseded by the new generation of turbofan aircraft.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

JAMES A. CONWAY

This study attempted to clarify the relationship of power of school heads and participation of English teachers in school decisions. A deliberate sample of eight schools…

Abstract

This study attempted to clarify the relationship of power of school heads and participation of English teachers in school decisions. A deliberate sample of eight schools was drawn from the schools in the northwest of England. The major criteria for selection were: size (medium to large); location(urban‐suburban and reasonably accessible from Manchester); and representatives of the types of schools found in that geographic area. A descriptive analysis indicated that English teachers do perceive themselves participating in most decision areas. At a second level of analysis the relationship between status and intensity of participation was computed with r = .544 for the 103 members of staff (p<.001). An implication is that competence is a criterion for status position, leading to involvement and hence power in the social system. The final analysis dealt with implications of use of power from a description of participation patterns. The clusterings found lend credence to the belief that English heads are controlling those areas of power where tangible rewards and punishments are evident. They appear to be supporting participatory management in such other areas as those where teachers do not desire involvement or those which carry minimal expenditure of organizational resources.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Paul Conway

Digital content is a common denominator that underlies all discussions on scholarly communication, digital preservation, and asset management. This past decade has seen a

Abstract

Purpose

Digital content is a common denominator that underlies all discussions on scholarly communication, digital preservation, and asset management. This past decade has seen a distinctive evolution in thinking among stakeholders on how to assemble, care for, deliver, and ultimately preserve digital resources in a college and university environment. At first, institutional repositories promised both a technical infrastructure and a policy framework for the active management of scholarly publications. Now other approaches that take a broader view of digital content hold sway, the result being confusion rather than clarity about where digital content originates, who the stakeholders are, and how to establish and adjust asset management priorities. This article seeks to present a model for plotting the range of digital content that might be amenable to management as digital assets in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reviews differing perspectives on digital content, outlines a generalized model, and suggests how the model could be used for examining the distribution of campus digital assets and fostering dialog on management priorities across stakeholder communities.

Findings

A multivariate model of digital content provides a rich framework for analyzing asset management priorities in a university setting. The model should be applied and tested in a variety of university settings.

Practical implications

The model is a tool for establishing asset management priorities across campus units that produce digital content.

Originality/value

The paper offers an original model for evaluating the asset values of digital content produced or acquired in a university context.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

John R. King and Alexander S. Spachis

Scheduling is defined by Baker as, “the allocation of resources over time to perform a collection of tasks”. The term facilities is often used instead of resources and the…

Abstract

Scheduling is defined by Baker as, “the allocation of resources over time to perform a collection of tasks”. The term facilities is often used instead of resources and the tasks to be performed may involve a variety of different operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2007

Tony Conway and Jeryl Whitelock

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether successful subsidised arts organisations are more likely to apply a relationship rather than transactional marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether successful subsidised arts organisations are more likely to apply a relationship rather than transactional marketing approach to overcome the tendency of not‐for‐profit organisations generally, and subsidised arts organisations particularly, to use marketing for short‐term, tactical purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was undertaken to identify whether “successful” subsidised performing arts organisations were indeed more strategic in their focus, whether they had applied a relationship marketing approach and whether such an approach had been influential in the development of their “success”. Preliminary research led to the production of a conceptual framework that identifies major partnerships and specific stakeholder types that need to be considered by a subsidised performing arts organisation if an effective relationship marketing approach is to be developed. This was used as the basis for subsequent research involving a multiple case study approach studying two “successful” theatres and one “unsuccessful” theatre in depth. The strengths of relationship between the various key stakeholder roles and artistic directors within the three theatres were analysed.

Findings

Although this research is limited to a case study analysis of three theatres, it does seem to provide evidence to suggest that building strong relationships with stakeholders other than end users can be advantageous to subsidised performing arts organisations.

Practical implications

It is likely that this approach could be successful for the subsidised arts generally and indeed for all those organisations in the not‐for‐profit sector where those who pay do not necessarily receive the service.

Originality/value

This article provides a discussion on successful subsidised arts organisations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Jennifer Creese, John-Paul Byrne, Anne Matthews, Aoife M. McDermott, Edel Conway and Niamh Humphries

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October–November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question “If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?”. In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions.

Findings

Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships.

Originality/value

This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Stephen Willcocks and Antony Conway

The paper attempts to examine the development of Primary Care Groups in the NHS, utilising a conceptual framework taken from relationship marketing. In particular, it…

Abstract

The paper attempts to examine the development of Primary Care Groups in the NHS, utilising a conceptual framework taken from relationship marketing. In particular, it looks at a framework representing the complex relationships between the Primary Care Group and a diverse range of internal and external stakeholders and the implications of these relationships. It reports the preliminary findings of an ongoing, in‐depth case study of two Primary Care Groups; with data collected from in‐depth interviews with a small number of key stakeholders. The results, so far, suggest the importance of developing and maintaining longer‐term relationships with a range of partners, both internal and external. It recommends that Primary Care Groups should develop strategies to work closely with these stakeholders, as an essential underpinning to developing continuous improvement in performance, quality and “user” retention.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Magnus Söderlund and Jan Mattsson

This paper aims to examine the impact of thinking about an event as an antecedent to subsequent talk about this event with others (i.e. word-of-mouth). Thinking has been a

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of thinking about an event as an antecedent to subsequent talk about this event with others (i.e. word-of-mouth). Thinking has been a neglected variable in word-of-mouth research, despite the fact that several conceptual arguments indicate that thinking is likely to enhance talking. Here, the thinking–talking association is examined in the context of service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with a critical incident method, and the main variables were measured with questionnaire items.

Findings

Thinking about a service encounter – after it has been completed – had a positive influence on subsequent talk to others about the encounter. The association was mediated by the memorability of the service encounter and the extent to which what had happened had been subject to rehearsal with the purpose of telling others about it. In addition, with respect to antecedents of consumer thinking, the results indicate that service encounter incongruity had a special role in why the consumer thinks about encounters after they have been completed.

Originality/value

The findings should be seen in relation to the dominant position of customer satisfaction as an antecedent to word-of-mouth in the existing literature. The present results, however, indicate that satisfaction’s contribution to the variation in talking about the encounter was modest.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Tony Conway and Debra Leighton

This paper seeks to investigate experiential marketing as a potential strategy for cultural attractions operating in a highly competitive leisure marketplace.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate experiential marketing as a potential strategy for cultural attractions operating in a highly competitive leisure marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the relevance of the experiential approach for the UK arts and cultural sector with its multiple stakeholders and innate tensions between commercial objectives and curatorial/artistic goals, between visitor access and preservation and between scholarship and entertainment.

Findings

Experiential marketing is evaluated as a means by which organizations in the arts and cultural sector can capture uncontended market space while satisfying the wants and expectations of an increasingly discerning visitor. The analytical basis for the evaluation is provided through comparative case studies – one from the heritage sector and one from the performing arts.

Originality/value

The experiential approach is considered and the findings applied to a conceptual model, with a view to offering proposals for the dissemination of best practice and identifying directions for further research.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

DAN RILEY

One of the most contentious issues in management is participatory decision‐making (PDM). While studies abound centred on hypothetical benefits, characteristics of involved…

Abstract

One of the most contentious issues in management is participatory decision‐making (PDM). While studies abound centred on hypothetical benefits, characteristics of involved individuals, its moral foundation and other aspects, few have investigated the pattern of utilization of avenues for PDM. This study investigates the relationship between nine avenues for teacher involvement, and the degree of actual and desired participation, plus decisional deprivation experienced by the respondents on a 30 item Critical Decision Inventory. Teachers' biographical characteristics; level of instruction, sex, teaching experience, academic qualifications and size of district of employment were also correlated with the utilization of avenues for participation. The major findings were (i) a high correlation between sex, level of instruction and avenues used; (ii) teaching experience was not supportive of earlier research; (iii) district size did not support previous studies; (iv) academic qualifications did not produce conclusive results.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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