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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Debajit Sarma, M. S. Akhtar, Partha Das, Puspita Das, Ganesh Gadiya, Neetu Shahi and A. Ciji

The present study aims to determine the proximate and mineral composition of important coldwater food fishes in the North Eastern Indian upland region to assess their…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to determine the proximate and mineral composition of important coldwater food fishes in the North Eastern Indian upland region to assess their nutritional quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is of original work and the analyses were performed using AOAC (1990). Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and determined by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test using SPSS (Version 19).

Findings

Crude protein levels ranged from 16-20 per cent, crude fat (CF) 9.60-1.54 per cent and ash 3.5-0.99 per cent. Moisture content was in the range of 71-78 per cent. The lowest moisture content was observed in Semiplotus semiplotus and highest in Labeo dero. Sodium, potassium and calcium content ranged from 92-309, 692-1435, 467-2021 mg/100g, respectively. Maximum concentration of potassium was found in Labeo dero followed by Labeo pangusia. Selenium was most abundant in L. dero, Labeo dyocheilus, Sanguina sanguine, Barilius bendelisis, Garra mullya, L. pangusia and Neolissochilus hexagonolepis. The maximum level of iron was evidenced in Tor tor.

Originality/value

The results obtained revealed that all the ten studied fishes are rich sources of nutrients including protein, macro and micro-minerals, which will be a healthy addition to human diet and will act as a ready reference for the nutritionists and other stakeholders.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2015

Boris Handal, Kevin Watson, Marc Fellman, Marguerite Maher and Miya White

This paper examines beliefs and attitudes in the context of how they influence the decisions of university Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) as a preface to…

Abstract

This paper examines beliefs and attitudes in the context of how they influence the decisions of university Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) as a preface to undertaking an empirical study in this area. It also aims at establishing a conceptual framework to guide the design of a questionnaire targeting beliefs about research ethics and the implications of these beliefs on review practices of HREC members throughout Australia.

Using content analysis of the extant body of the literature the paper examines the relationship between the concepts of beliefs and knowledge, beliefs and attitudes, and among beliefs, attitudes and behaviour in the context of research ethics.

The discussion suggests that ethics approval practices can, at times, be influenced more by personal beliefs than by contemporary review standards. It is also suggested that personal beliefs can be transmitted through the review process and that HRECs can serve to influence the transfer of values from reviewers to researchers.

The framework that this paper presents has the potential to appraise an array of perspectives which in turn would guide the design of professional development programs. In addition, an improved, more nuanced understanding of how HREC members make ethical decisions will positively impact and inform best practice in the review of ethical applications for research projects.

The paper presents a novel theoretical framework underpinning research ethics reviewer beliefs and attitudes within a contemporary context.

Details

Conscience, Leadership and the Problem of ‘Dirty Hands’
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-203-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Jun Li and Jing Lin

Along with the “reform and open door” policy launched in the late 1970s, China has experienced an annual average GDP growth rate of 9.8% between 1978 and 2002 (Hu, 2003

Abstract

Along with the “reform and open door” policy launched in the late 1970s, China has experienced an annual average GDP growth rate of 9.8% between 1978 and 2002 (Hu, 2003, October 19). China's economy system has also gone through a fundamental transition from a central planning system to a socialist free market economy. To cope with the booming economy and radical social changes, the higher education system of China has been undergoing a process of expansion with marketization (World Bank, 1997).

Details

The Worldwide Transformation of Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1487-4

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