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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

A. Ben Oumlil and Joseph L. Balloun

This study aims to examine the ethical beliefs and moral philosophical typologies, the relative effect of religiosity on personal ethical beliefs and behavior of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the ethical beliefs and moral philosophical typologies, the relative effect of religiosity on personal ethical beliefs and behavior of the collectivist and individualistic business executives.

Design/methodology/approach

This research assesses the relative impact of significant cultural factors on the business ethical decision-making process in a Western and individualistic cultural context (the USA) in comparison to a non-Western and collective cultural context (Morocco). To understand how cultural variations influence business ethical practices, this study adopts Hofstede’s cultural framework for comparison of business executives’ ethical decisions within a cross-cultural context. Hypotheses are tested on survey data on 172 business executives.

Findings

Results show that most collective business executives are “Situationists”. The findings reveal a strong, positive relationship between business managers’ religiosity and their idealism degrees. This study also reveals mixed findings in examining the correlation of religiosity with various components of ethical intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The link between religiosity and ethical intentions needs to be viewed with caution. This calls for expanding the scope of this study into other cultures and religions.

Practical implications

Differences of the findings in ethical typologies between collective and individualistic business executives may lead to different negotiation styles on ethical business decisions and issues. Managers from a collective culture are not as likely to exhibit much change in their initial ethical orientation(s). There is a strong positive relationship between a business manager’s religiosity and his/her degree of idealism. Thus, the more religious business managers are, the more Absolutist they are when making ethical and moral judgments.

Originality/value

This research works to fill the gap by examining the impact of culture on the business/marketing ethical decision-making processes within the contexts of a Western cultural and developed nation and a non-Western cultural, and developing/Mediterranean/North African nation. The findings clarify the influence of culture on business ethical decisions. Such an understanding can assist corporate managers in developing and successfully implementing business ethical codes that lead to enhanced moral conduct in their organizations.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

A. Ben Oumlil and Joseph L. Balloun

Researchers emphasized that only a small effort has addressed the beliefs and attitudes of millennials toward advertising. The purpose of this study is also to respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers emphasized that only a small effort has addressed the beliefs and attitudes of millennials toward advertising. The purpose of this study is also to respond to researchers’ recognition of the dearth of cross-national advertising and globalization studies in emerging markets. To fill this theoretical gap in the literature, this study aims to assess attitudinal differences and similarities, as well as the underlying structures of the attitude toward advertising in general (AG), of millennial consumers from developed and emerging markets (USA, UK, France, Spain and Morocco).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from millennials through self-administered survey questionnaires. It drew from findings of previous research and theoretical development by Bauer and Greyser, Pollay and Mittal, Sandage and Leckenby, Muehling, Durvasula and Netemeyer, and Andrews, Lysonski and Durvasula. Various statistical analyses were used to explore differences and similarities in AG.

Findings

The paper concludes that the two-factor solution framework of AG is inadequate. Research results also indicated that millennials from each of the five different countries studied did not indicate overwhelmingly favorable or unfavorable AG. This study found eight factors/constructs (i.e. promote bad things as good, product information, social role and image, hedonism/pleasure, good for the economy, materialism, falsity and “not interpretable”) as descriptors of the millennials from the five nations’ AG.

Research limitations/implications

The differences in advertising beliefs and attitudes among samples in the five countries studied may be because of such factors as historical values, practices and regulations. Cultural values and dimension may influence millennials’ perceived AG and need to be taken into consideration.

Practical implications

Academicians and practitioners in the advertising field need to appreciate the country’s cultural peculiarities. In understanding the advertising preferences of millennial consumers in these five markets, marketing and advertising executives may have localized their advertising messages for each studied market, resulting in different responses from these millennial consumers.

Originality/value

Millennials need not be conceptualized as a single niche market. While the focus of most of research in the determinants of AG had been within the Western business/consumer construct, the goal is to include assessment of AG in a non-Western, emerging market. This paper addresses the dearth in determinants of AG research in North Africa and other emerging markets.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Orhan Erdem, A. Ben Oumlil and Secil Tuncalp

Retailing business is greatly affected by the patronage behavioral orientations of shoppers. Understanding these orientations can assist retailers in developing…

Abstract

Retailing business is greatly affected by the patronage behavioral orientations of shoppers. Understanding these orientations can assist retailers in developing appropriate marketing strategies toward meeting the needs and wants of consumers. One important factor explaining consumer behavioral orientations is their values. Another important factor affecting consumer behavioral orientations is the store image, an image shaped by store attributes. This study examines the linkage between consumer values and the importance of some salient store attributes. Marketing management implications are also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

A. Ben Oumlil and Alvin J. Williams

Highlights the role of consumer education in enhancing the capacity of mature consumers to navigate the increasingly complex marketplace. Consumer education programs can…

Abstract

Highlights the role of consumer education in enhancing the capacity of mature consumers to navigate the increasingly complex marketplace. Consumer education programs can provide significant benefits, including identification of market information, complaint and consumer redress procedures, and understanding a more technology‐based consumer environment. A conceptual model of the relationship between consumer education and mature consumers’ ability to manage marketplace dynamics is developed and discussed. Marketing management implications of consumer education for mature segments are posited and discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

A. Ben Oumlil

The purpose of this paper is to address what a sound warranty policy entails by identifying the key variables involved in the development of a warranty program.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address what a sound warranty policy entails by identifying the key variables involved in the development of a warranty program.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample population was composed of employees in the US division involved with high‐tech product warranties. A survey questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants.

Findings

The paper finds that the formality of the warranty policy should depend on its complexity. Differences exist between types of warranty based on the product knowledge of the buyer. Although a standardized warranty is easy to administer, as the product line diversifies, it becomes more challenging to standardize.

Research limitations/implications

This study can be expanded by examining how companies balance the cost/quality/warranty ability of the product, the techniques used to allocate warranty costs, and to evaluate multiple companies/industries, perhaps with a longitudinal focus.

Practical implications

The formality can be used to communicate the product warranty throughout the organization. Each department has a responsibility to the customer, so team members from service, product development, and marketing should plan and develop the warranty. A standardized warranty can send a clearer message to a customer about a firm's products. Simplifying front and back‐end processing and streamlining support structures can reduce costs.

Originality/value

In this paper, the identified key variable is brought out in warranty management framework. The development of this framework will satisfy a current, critical need to provide guidelines with all the steps needed to develop a warranty policy.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

A. Ben Oumlil

This case study aims to develop and empirically test a general framework for the implementation and evaluation of a warranty policy (i.e. implementation, support…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to develop and empirically test a general framework for the implementation and evaluation of a warranty policy (i.e. implementation, support structure, and evaluation stages) within the context of a high‐tech global firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of the employees of an anonymous US‐based global high tech firm.

Findings

The findings for the implementation stage report that the cost and profit centers should have their costs allocated on the basis of activity. For the support structure, there is a negative response to outsourcing as an option for implementing the warranty policy. For the evaluation, findings report that US firms should reevaluate their pricing, quality, and warranty strategy for domestic and international markets.

Research limitations/implications

This case study can be expanded by examining how companies balance the cost/quality/warranty ability of the product, the techniques used to allocate warranty costs, and to evaluate multiple companies/industries, perhaps with a longitudinal focus.

Practical implications

Findings report that the budgeted costs should be allocated depending on the type of incident. The majority of outsourcing opponents consisted of service personnel while those in favor were from product marketing departments. Also, the US firms need to provide written warranty information to their customers.

Originality/value

The proposed framework will satisfy a current, critical need to provide guidelines for the steps needed to implement and evaluate a warranty policy within a context of a high tech global company. Additionally, this case research study's key contribution lies in its attempt to address warranty management processes within a multitude of a firm's departments. Furthermore, the anonymous high tech company used in this study was chosen as a sample because the company offered a wide range of products, warranties, and service options. The company also utilized a vast reseller base to sell and service its products. This method offered the potential to gain better insight with regards to the role of resellers in a warranty program. It also marketed products and services to six specific industries: financial, retail, transportation, manufacturing, communications, and the public. This broad industrial perspective gave the study added cross‐industries' insight in reference to implementation and evaluation of a good warranty policy since the anonymous high tech company considers these industries to be sustainable industries in the USA and abroad.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Chunli Ji and Sudhir H. Kale

The purpose of this paper is to assess the current state of consumer education in the context of responsible gambling in Macao and to suggest ways in which Macao could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the current state of consumer education in the context of responsible gambling in Macao and to suggest ways in which Macao could enhance its consumer education efforts to meet its challenges with regard to responsible gambling.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory and interpretative approaches have been adopted to suggest why and how Macao should strengthen responsible gambling education. The methodology involved extensive review of relevant academic research, government documents and reports related to Macao's responsible gambling initiatives.

Findings

Effective long-term responsible gambling education is needed in Macao to further people's understanding of gambling and gambler's fallacy. The government should take leadership in influencing all stakeholders toward effective initiatives and behaviors related to responsible gambling education.

Originality/value

Although research on responsible gambling education is still in its infancy, its importance in reducing common misconceptions about gambling has already been established. This study contributes to strengthen Macao's responsible gambling practices by proposing several changes needed to provide desired outcomes through consumer education.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Jaqueline Pels

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Halimin Herjanto and Muslim Amin

Deodorant, as a hygienic product, becomes a daily necessity product and has significant benefits to its users. Yet, the real motivation for consuming deodorant is not…

Abstract

Purpose

Deodorant, as a hygienic product, becomes a daily necessity product and has significant benefits to its users. Yet, the real motivation for consuming deodorant is not fully understood, and therefore, this study aims to join the extant literature in this context by investigating the effect of personal values.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study using the laddering approach (means-end analytic) was used and 50 college students participated in this study.

Findings

The hierarchical value maps show that achievement, power, security and benevolent personal values are responsible for millennials deodorant consumption behavior. Fragrance, price and antiperspirant are the most important attributes that appeal to such consumption.

Practical implications

The findings also suggested that three different situational factors generated these different personal values. It includes a pre-career environment, puberty and maintaining self-stability. The strongest attributes that appeal to millennials are fragrance, price, antiperspirant, brand, long-lasting quality and packaging.

Originality/value

This study offers the means-end approach to the framework of millennials deodorant consumption behavior and which can be implemented to investigate millennials consumption decision-making processes.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Gabriele Santoro, Fabio Fiano, Bernardo Bertoldi and Francesco Ciampi

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on how big data deployment transforms organizational practices, thereby generating potential benefits, in a specific industry: retail.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on how big data deployment transforms organizational practices, thereby generating potential benefits, in a specific industry: retail.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the paper’s goal, the authors have conducted several semi-structured interviews with marketing managers of four retailers in Italy, and researched secondary data to get a broader picture of big data deployment in the organizations.

Findings

Data analysis helped identify specific aspects related to big data deployment, data gathering methods, required competences and data sharing approaches.

Originality/value

Despite the growing interest in big data in various fields of research, there are still few empirical studies on big data deployment in organizations in the management field, and even fewer on specific sectors. This research provides evidence of specific areas of analysis concerning big data in the retail industry.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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