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Article

A.Z. Keller, M. Meniconi, I. Al‐Shammari and K. Cassidy

Data sets were compiled from the MHIDAS data bank for incidents where there had been five or more fatalities, ten or more injuries, 50 evacuations, or US$1 million damage…

Abstract

Data sets were compiled from the MHIDAS data bank for incidents where there had been five or more fatalities, ten or more injuries, 50 evacuations, or US$1 million damage. The data were converted to magnitudes on the Bradford Disaster Scale and analysed using maximum likelihood. Parameters determined from the estimation procedures were compared for compatibility between themselves and the results of analyses using other data.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

A.F. Al‐Madhari and M.O. Elberier

Examines attitudes to disasters in Arab countries and argues that they are frequently not reported and therefore not analysed in sufficient detail. Using data from the US…

Abstract

Examines attitudes to disasters in Arab countries and argues that they are frequently not reported and therefore not analysed in sufficient detail. Using data from the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance describes the types and frequency of natural disasters throughout the Arab world. Concentrates on drought as this is by far the largest cause of fatalities in the region. Outlines current policies regarding disaster prevention and management and concludes by suggesting ways in which the present situation could be improved.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

A.Z. Keller and A.F. Al‐Madhari

Presents a method of analysis to obtain risk profiles for major adverse events. The method is based on a previously published method for probabilistically modelling…

Abstract

Presents a method of analysis to obtain risk profiles for major adverse events. The method is based on a previously published method for probabilistically modelling historical data of past major accidents and disasters. Shows that insurable costs arising from such major events can be modelled using the two‐parameter Weibull distribution. Values of parameters obtained using different data sets are seen to be comparable in value. Discusses the relevance of this work to risk analysis and identifies areas of research requiring future development.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

Ibrahim M. Shaluf, Fakharul‐razi Ahmadun and Sa’ari Mustapha

Disasters are classified as natural and man‐made disasters. Man‐made disaster, which occurs at the major hazard installation, is a technological disaster. For an incident…

Abstract

Disasters are classified as natural and man‐made disasters. Man‐made disaster, which occurs at the major hazard installation, is a technological disaster. For an incident to be classified as technological disaster criteria are required to be met. Several criteria have been proposed by researchers and agencies defining the disasters in terms of casualties, economic loss and environmental impact. Few models have been drawn describing the sequence of development of the technological disaster. This paper reviews in detail the proposed criteria, which define the disaster. The paper also summarizes the models which describe the disaster stages. Finally the paper summarizes a proposed model of the technological disaster precondition phase for major accidents.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

Ibrahim M. Shaluf, Fakharu’l‐razi Ahmadun and Aini Mat Said

A disaster and a crisis are two different, and related events. The two terms are sometimes used interchangeably. Man‐made disaster that occurs at an industrial…

Abstract

A disaster and a crisis are two different, and related events. The two terms are sometimes used interchangeably. Man‐made disaster that occurs at an industrial organization, may develop into an industrial crisis. Crisis can happen to any organization. It has been noted that there were no universally accepted definitions yet developed for disaster and crisis. There is also no universally available criteria, to define the disaster in terms of the consequences, such as the casualties and the cost of damage. This paper reviews the definitions, types, characteristics, criteria and models of disaster and crisis. Also the types of crisis were rearranged and the differences between the disasters and crises have been summarized.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Book part

Carolina Herrera-Cano (MIB) and Alejandro Herrera-Cano

The purpose of this chapter is to address the issue of climate change and its effects on developing insular countries like the Maldives in order to identify adaptive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to address the issue of climate change and its effects on developing insular countries like the Maldives in order to identify adaptive mechanisms and new opportunities in the international context towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account its environmental and social incidences.

Design/methodology/approach

Firstly, the chapter introduces some generalities of the Republic of the Maldives and its current challenges. Next, there is a description of the economy of the islands: here the importance of its major source of income, the tourism industry, is highlighted. Then, vulnerabilities and adaptive mechanisms are explored for the particular case of tourism.

Findings

Maldivian current efforts in disaster risk management (DRM) mitigation, preparedness, response, and reconstruction stages, and the work between government, private organizations, and civil society, implemented since the 2004 tsunami; and as a response to climate change, are examples of how to apply collaborative approaches proposed by Sustainable Development Objectives, COP21 agreement, and Sendai Framework.

Research limitations/implications

It is difficult to measure the consequences of sustainable development actions by the Maldivian government, especially in the international environment.

Practical implications

The study of the Maldivian DRM strategy in the context of climate change and the lessons from the Maldives’ tourism sector development under climate action serves as a model for other international business organizations which aim to reach sustainable development standards in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Originality/value

This chapter evaluated important opportunities for sustainable development agenda that can be learned from DRM measures in Maldives.

Details

Climate Change and the 2030 Corporate Agenda for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-819-6

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Book part

Andreas Neef and Jesse Hession Grayman

This chapter introduces the tourism–disaster–conflict nexus through a comprehensive review of the contemporary social science literature. After reviewing conceptual…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the tourism–disaster–conflict nexus through a comprehensive review of the contemporary social science literature. After reviewing conceptual definitions of tourism, disaster and conflict, the chapter explores various axes that link through this nexus. The linkages between tourism and disaster include tourism as a trigger or amplifier of disasters, the impacts of disasters on the tourism industry, tourism as a driver of disaster recovery and disaster risk reduction strategies in the tourism sector. Linkages between tourism and conflict include the idea that tourism can be a force for peace and stability, the niche status of danger zone or dark heritage tourism, the concept of phoenix tourism in post-conflict destination rebranding, tourism and cultural conflicts, and tourism’s conflicts over land and resources. Linkages between disaster and conflict include disasters as triggers or intensifiers of civil conflict, disaster diplomacy and conflict resolution, disaster capitalism, and gender-based violence and intra-household conflict in the wake of disasters. These are some of the conversations that organise this volume, and this introductory chapter ends with a summary of the chapters that follow.

Details

The Tourism–Disaster–Conflict Nexus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-100-3

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Article

Imoh Antai, Crispin Mutshinda and Richard Owusu

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a 3R (right time, right place, and right material) principle for characterizing failure in humanitarian/relief supply chains…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a 3R (right time, right place, and right material) principle for characterizing failure in humanitarian/relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters, and describes a Bayesian methodology of the failure odds with regard to external factors that may affect the disaster-relief outcome, and distinctive supply chain proneness to failure.

Design/methodology/approach

The suggested 3Rs combine simplicity and completeness, enclosing all aspects of the 7R principle popular within business logistics. A fixed effects logistic regression model is designed, with a Bayesian approach, to relate the supply chains’ odds for success in disaster-relief to potential environmental predictors, while accounting for distinctive supply chains’ proneness to failure.

Findings

Analysis of simulated data demonstrate the model’s ability to distinguish relief supply chains with regards to their disaster-relief failure odds, taking into account pertinent external factors and supply chain idiosyncrasies.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the complex nature of natural disasters and the scarcity of subsequent data, the paper employs computer-simulated data to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology.

Originality/value

The 3R principle offers a simple and familiar basis for evaluating failure in relief supply chains’ response to natural disasters. Also, it brings the issues of customer orientation within humanitarian relief and supply operations to the fore, which had only been implicit within the humanitarian and relief supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article

Ibrahim Mohamed Shaluf

This paper aims to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disaster types.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide graduate students, researchers, and government and independent agencies with an overview of disaster types.

Design/methodology/approach

Disaster types have been the subject of research by and concern to academicians and to government and independent agencies. The paper summarizes the views of researchers and agencies. Disaster types are collected from several sources such as technical, general articles, internet web sites, and internal reports. Disaster definitions, criteria and types are reviewed. Disasters are classified into natural disasters, man‐made disasters, and hybrid disasters. Man‐made disasters are classified into technological disasters, transportation accidents, public places failure, and production failure. The paper presents a comparison between the main types of disasters.

Findings

Disasters are classified into three types: naturals, man‐mades, and hybrid disasters. It is believed that the three disaster types cover all disastrous events. No definition of disaster is universally accepted. Several criteria are proposed to define disasters. Understanding of disaster definitions, criteria, and types aids researchers and agencies in the proper classification, good recording, and better analysis of disasters. Disasters have different characteristics and impact; however, disasters have a common element, which is their severity.

Originality/value

This paper presents a definition of and criteria for disasters. The paper also presents an overview of disaster types. The paper presents a comparison between the main types of disasters, and combines various disaster terms into one record.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article

Jonathon Mackay, Albert Munoz and Matthew Pepper

The purpose of this paper is to construct a typology of a disaster that informs humanitarian-relief supply chain (HRSC) design across the stages of disaster relief.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a typology of a disaster that informs humanitarian-relief supply chain (HRSC) design across the stages of disaster relief.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to an interdisciplinary review of pertinent literature, this paper utilises a typology construction method to propose theoretically and methodologically sound dimensions of disasters.

Findings

Whilst semantic arguments surrounding the concept of a “disaster” are ongoing, the authors propose three typologies based upon six dimensions that serve as interdependent variables informing resultant HRSC design considerations. These are speed of onset, time horizon, spatial considerations, affected population needs, perceived probability of occurrence and perceived magnitude of consequence. These combinational and independent relationships of the variables offer insight into key HRSC design-making considerations.

Research limitations/implications

The study improves conceptual knowledge of disasters, distilling the concept to only the dimensions applicable to HRSC design, omitting other applications. The typologies provide empirical cell types based on extant literature, but do not apply the models towards new or future phenomena.

Practical implications

This paper provides HRSC practitioners with normative guidance through a more targeted approach to disaster relief, with a focus on the impacted system and resulting interactions’ correspondence to HRSC design.

Originality/value

This paper provides three typological models of disasters uniquely constructed for HRSC design across the various stages of disaster relief.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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