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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Abdalmenem Owda, José Balsa-Barreiro and Dieter Fritsch

Representative cultural heritage sites and monuments around the world have been lost or damaged by natural disasters, human conflicts and daily erosion and deterioration…

Abstract

Purpose

Representative cultural heritage sites and monuments around the world have been lost or damaged by natural disasters, human conflicts and daily erosion and deterioration. Documentation and digital preservation by using three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques enables to ensure the knowledge and access for future generations. Efficient working methods and techniques should be proposed for this purpose.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a methodology for the generation of 3D photorealistic models of representative historical buildings is introduced, for using data are obtained using terrestrial laser scanning systems and photogrammetry.

Findings

In this paper, an approach to reconstruct 3D photorealistic models by using laser scanning and photogrammetric data is shown. Combination of data from both sources offers an improved solution for 3D reconstruction of historical buildings, sites and places. Integration of 3D models into virtual globes and/or software applications can ensure digital preservation and knowledge for next generations.

Research limitations/implications

Results obtained in a concrete building are shown. However, each building or studied area can show some other different drawbacks.

Practical implications

The study enables to generate 3D and four-dimensional models of most valuable buildings and contribute to the preservation and documentation of the cultural heritage.

Social implications

The study enables digital documentation and preservation of cultural heritage.

Originality/value

A proper solution at field (in a real and complicated case) is explained, in addition to the results, which are shown.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

J. Paul Siebert and Stephen J. Marshall

Describes a non‐contact optical sensing technology called C3D that is based on speckle texture projection photogrammetry. C3D has been applied to capturing all‐round 3D

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2305

Abstract

Describes a non‐contact optical sensing technology called C3D that is based on speckle texture projection photogrammetry. C3D has been applied to capturing all‐round 3D models of the human body of high dimensional accuracy and photorealistic appearance. The essential strengths and limitation of the C3D approach are presented and the basic principles of this stereo‐imaging approach are outlined, from image capture and basic 3D model construction to multi‐view capture and all‐round 3D model integration. A number of law enforcement, medical and commercial applications are described briefly including prisoner 3D face models, maxillofacial and orofacial cleft assessment, breast imaging and foot scanning. Ongoing research in real‐time capture and processing, and model construction from naturally illuminated image sources is also outlined.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Hashem Mohammad Khries

This paper aims to help archaeologists, museums’ curators and technicians in understanding the principle of using the photogrammetry and 3D scanner for the museum…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help archaeologists, museums’ curators and technicians in understanding the principle of using the photogrammetry and 3D scanner for the museum archaeological objects in a practical way by presenting specific examples for both methods. Another purpose is to evaluate the performance offered by the photogrammetry and the three-dimensional (3D) scanner device, with the aim of providing a suitable solution to the different shapes and sizes of the archaeological objects.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used the camera Canon EOS 1300 D for photographing and Einscan Pro 2X Plus as a 3D scanning device for several years on different kinds of objects made of various materials, including ceramic, stone, glass and metal.

Findings

This paper showed that both approaches create 3D models with high resolution in easy and different ways.

Practical implications

Handling objects and preparing them for photographing or scanning has involved a number of caveats and challenges regarding the risk of damage that the author had to bear in mind.

Originality/value

This paper is completely based on the author’s personal experiences of creating 3D image of various objects in the project of Documentation of Objects in the Jordanian Archaeological Museums.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Kirsten Butcher, Madlyn Runburg and Michelle Hudson

This paper aims to examine the impact of using digitized objects for inquiry with middle-school classrooms. Research analyzed critical thinking processes and student…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of using digitized objects for inquiry with middle-school classrooms. Research analyzed critical thinking processes and student engagement during collaborative investigations with 3D models of authentic objects.

Design/methodology/approach

Digitized objects were 3D scans of fossils from the paleontology collection at the Natural History Museum of Utah implemented as 3D prints and 3D virtual models. Verbal protocol analysis examined critical thinking processes during collaborative student learning. Engagement was assessed via student feedback and a classroom observation protocol.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that digitized objects facilitated key critical thinking processes, particularly observation, problem finding, elaboration and evaluation. Student feedback was very positive and focused on strong interest in 3D technologies and the ability to engage in authentic exploration. Observations showed very high levels of on-task engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is necessary to determine if findings generalize across varied learner populations, including broader age ranges and socioeconomic samples, to activities implemented as fully online experiences and to digitized objects from varied domains.

Originality/value

Findings demonstrate digitized objects are effective methods to engage students in critical thinking and to promote engagement with authentic objects during classroom learning. Results demonstrate strong potential of new technologies to leverage the educational impact of digitized objects from local collections, setting the stage for expanded educational outreach by museums and libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Andy Spence, Mike Robb, Mark Timmins and Mike Chantler

We present recent results from an EPSRC funded project VirTex (Virtual Textile Catalogues). The goal of this project is to develop graphics and image‐processing software…

Abstract

We present recent results from an EPSRC funded project VirTex (Virtual Textile Catalogues). The goal of this project is to develop graphics and image‐processing software for the capture, storage, search, retrieval and visualisation of 3D textile samples. The ultimate objective is to develop a web‐based application that allows the user to search a database for suitable textiles and to visualize selected samples using real‐time photorealistic 3D animation. The main novelty of this work is in the combined use of photometric stereo and real‐time per‐pixel‐rendering for the capture and visualisation of textile samples. Photometric stereo is a simple method that allows both bump map and colour map of a surface texture to be captured digitally. It uses a single fixed camera to obtain three images under three different illumination conditions. The colour map is the image that would be obtained under diffuse lighting. The bump map describes the small undulations of the surface relief. When imported into a standard graphics program these images can be used to texture 3D models. The appearance is particularly photorealistic, especially under changing illumination and viewpoints. The viewer can manipulate both viewpoint and lighting to gain a deeper perception of the properties of the textile sample. In addition, these images can be used with 3D models of products to provide extremely accurate visualisations for the customer. Until recently, these images could only be rendered using ray‐tracing software. However, recent consumer‐level graphics cards from companies such as Nvidia, ATI and 3Dlabs provide real‐time per‐pixel shading. We have developed software that takes advantage of the advanced rendering features of these cards to render images in real‐time. It uses photometrically acquired bump and colour maps of textiles to provide real‐time visualisation of a textile sample, under user‐controlled illumination, pose and flex.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Ming Tang and Dihua Yang

Having been a promising visualization tool since 1950s, ironically, virtual reality is not widely used in the architectural design and evaluation process due to several…

Abstract

Having been a promising visualization tool since 1950s, ironically, virtual reality is not widely used in the architectural design and evaluation process due to several constrains, such as the high cost of equipments and advanced programming skills required. This paper described the collaboration between design computing courses and architecture design studios that have been taught at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) in 2004 and 2005. These courses explored several practical methods to integrate Low Cost Virtual Reality Aided Design (LC-VRAD) in the architectural design process. As a summary of the collaboration, this paper refers to three main aspects: (1) How to use game engine to design an affordable VR system in the ordinary studio environment. (2) How to integrate VR, into the design process, not only as a visualization tool, but also as a design instrument. (3) How to evaluate different methods of representing architectural models based on the efficiency of workflow, rendering quality and users' feedback.

Support by the Game and Interactive Design Department at SCAD, students in the School of Building Arts implemented two Low Cost VRAD methods in various design phases, starting from site analysis, schematic design, design development to the final presentation. Two popular game engines, Epic Game's Unreal engine and Director MX's Shockwave engine, were introduced to students to visualize their project in real-time. We discussed computer-aided design theories including the application of VR, as well as digital computing and human computer interaction. At the end of each quarter, feedbacks from students and faculties were collected and analyzed. These methods were revised and improved consistently across 2004 and 2005 academic year.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Nawel Lafioune and Michèle St-Jacques

This paper aims to create a new searchable 3D city model to help managers improve their decision-making.

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1061

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to create a new searchable 3D city model to help managers improve their decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper identifies data management basics and the key elements used in the new model design; it further analyzes five-city models, presents its findings and proposes analytical trends for the new model. It discusses the concepts underlying existing models, explains the benefit brought by the proposed model and demonstrates its robustness.

Findings

City systems can be interconnected, thanks to data digitization and the integration of new technologies into different management processes. Although there are several 3D city models available, none of those identified in this research can be queried for several sectors.

Research limitations/implications

This model design can only be successfully realized in the presence of a public mandate. Potential limitations include information security risks and political non-acceptance.

Originality/value

The present work proposes a searchable and high performance model having the distinctive capacity to bring together city systems and perform real-time data analysis in order to extract important information needed to guide the city, and in the context of a global vision.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Multi-Channel Marketing, Branding and Retail Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-455-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Eugene Ch’ng, Shengdan Cai, Tong Evelyn Zhang and Fui-Theng Leow

The purpose of this paper is to present the rationale for democratising the digital reproduction of cultural heritage via “mass photogrammetry”, by providing approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the rationale for democratising the digital reproduction of cultural heritage via “mass photogrammetry”, by providing approaches to digitise objects from cultural heritage collections housed in museums or private spaces using devices and photogrammetry techniques accessible to the public. The paper is intended as a democratised approach rather than as a “scientific approach” for the purpose that mass photogrammetry can be achieved at scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology aims to convert the art of photogrammetry into a more mechanical approach by overcoming common difficulties faced within exhibition spaces. This approach is replicable and allows anyone possessing inexpensive equipment with basic knowledge of photogrammetry to achieve acceptable results.

Findings

The authors present the experience of acquiring over 300 3D models through photogrammetry from over 25 priority sites and museums in East Asia. The approach covers the entire process from capturing to editing, and importing 3D models into integrated development environments for displays such as interactive 3D, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

Practical implications

The simplistic approach for democratised, mass photogrammetry has implications for stirring public interests in the digital preservation of heritage objects in countries where museums and cultural institutions have little access to digital teams, provided that Intellectual Property issues are cared for. The approach to mass photogrammetry also means that personal cultural heritage objects hidden within the homes of various societies and relics in circulation in the antiques market can be made accessible globally at scale.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the complete practical nature of photogrammetry conducted within cultural institutions. The authors provide a means for the public to conduct good photogrammetry so that all cultural heritage objects can be digitally recorded and shared globally so as to promote the cross-cultural appreciation of material cultures from the past.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Jun Wang, Xiangyu Wang, Wenchi Shou and Bo Xu

The purpose of this research is to investigate a new approach with its supporting building information modelling (BIM) + augmented reality (AR) tool to enhance…

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3363

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate a new approach with its supporting building information modelling (BIM) + augmented reality (AR) tool to enhance architectural visualisation in building life cycle. Traditional approaches to visualise architectural design concentrate on static pictures or three-dimensional (3D) scale models which cause problems, such as expensive design evolution, lack of stakeholders’ communication and limited reusability. The 3D animated fly-throughs still occur on a computer screen in two-dimensions and seem cold and mechanical, unless done with advanced production software.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of this research included case study and interview. It was, first, stated, from the building process perspective, how the BIM + AR for Architectural Visualisation System (BAAVS) was realised by integrating two types of visualisation techniques: BIM and AR, and four stages of building life cycle. Then the paper demonstrated four case studies to validate the BAAVS. Finally, four interviews were made with each case manager and team members to collect feedback on utilising BAAVS technology. Questions were asked in the areas of benefits, drawbacks and technical limitations with respect to BAAVS.

Findings

Feedback from the stakeholders involved in the four cases indicated that BAAVS was useful and efficient to visualise architectural design and communicate with each other.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates BAAVS that integrated BIM and AR into architectural visualisation. The system supports an innovative performance that allows: designers to put virtual building scheme in physical environment; owners to gain an immersive and interactive experience; and property sellers to communicate with customers efficiently.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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