Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Allan H. Church, Lorraine M. Dawson, Kira L. Barden, Christina R. Fleck, Christopher T. Rotolo and Michael Tuller

Benchmark surveys regarding talent management assessment practices and interventions of choice for organization development (OD) practitioners have shown 360-degree

Abstract

Benchmark surveys regarding talent management assessment practices and interventions of choice for organization development (OD) practitioners have shown 360-degree feedback to be a popular tool for both development and decision-making in the field today. Although much has been written about implementing 360-degree feedback since its inception in the 1990s, few longitudinal case examples exist where interventions have been applied and their impact measured successfully. This chapter closes the gap by providing research findings and key learnings from five different implementation strategies for enhancing 360-degree feedback in a large multi-national organization. Recommendations and implications for future research are discussed.

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Glenys Drew

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceived usefulness to participants of a particular 360‐degree leadership survey process to assist an understanding of how…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceived usefulness to participants of a particular 360‐degree leadership survey process to assist an understanding of how ratees receive and respond to 360‐degree feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a sample of eight new and emergent leaders at one university in Australia who complete a 360‐degree feedback survey. Through semi‐structured interviews, they are asked to report on their learning as a result of undertaking the 360‐degree exercise. A constant comparison method of data analysis is used to analyse the participants' responses.

Findings

The research study finds from the group undertaking the 360‐degree feedback process that, in equal proportion, participants report receiving: no surprising feedback but reinforcement and affirmation; and new insights, with developmental strategies identified to effect change as a result of feedback. The paper argues, from findings of the literature and the study, the importance of a measure of institutional support for the feedback process including sound facilitation. The results of the semi‐structured conversations held with the small sample attest to the importance of self‐efficacy (belief of capacity to learn and develop) on the part of ratees to act on feedback gained, and of the organisation's role in assisting self‐efficacy in 360‐degree programs. The findings support an incremental theory approach in that participants see the feedback exercise as an opportunity to improve their capabilities and pursue learning goals over time by acting on development items suggested by the feedback. It is posited that support received by participants in undertaking the feedback activity as part of a program of development contributes to the positive response. The paper concludes by providing some guidelines for conducting effective 360‐degree feedback discussions.

Originality/value

There is a reasonable body of literature about 360‐degree feedback processes from a theoretical standpoint. This qualitative study addresses a relative gap in the literature to explore how participants describe their experience of undertaking a facilitated 360‐degree feedback exercise, including whether they gain new knowledge, or no new knowledge. The paper also suggests some principles that might be employed in facilitating 360‐degree feedback to maximise benefit from the process.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Thomas N. Garavan, Michael Morley and Mary Flynn

Focuses on 360 degree feedback which is defined as a contrived method of providing a flow of feedback to employees from all directions. Addresses the purposes of feedback

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Abstract

Focuses on 360 degree feedback which is defined as a contrived method of providing a flow of feedback to employees from all directions. Addresses the purposes of feedback within the organization, with special emphasis on its use for employee development and careeµr development; the benefits of such feedback to the organization and the individuals involved; the mechanisms used to obtain feedback; and, finally, the pitfalls of 360 degree feedback.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Stéphane Brutus, Manuel London and Jennifer Martineau

This study focused on the relationship between 360‐degree (multi‐source) survey feedback to managers and subsequent selection of development goals. We hypothesized that…

4053

Abstract

This study focused on the relationship between 360‐degree (multi‐source) survey feedback to managers and subsequent selection of development goals. We hypothesized that performance ratings would be negatively related to setting development goals, that supervisor ratings would have a greater effect than ratings from peers or subordinates in the selection of developmental goals, and that self‐other discrepancies would be related to goal selection. Data from 2,163 managers showed that multi‐source feedback contributed to the selection of developmental goals. However, contrary to expectations, subordinate ratings were most important to goal setting compared to ratings from any other sources. Direct feedback itself affected goal selection, not its relationship to self‐perceptions. For several goals, the relationship between performance ratings and goal selection was stronger for lower level managers. Implications of the results for the practice of 360‐degree feedback and related research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Silva Karkoulian, Jordan Srour and Leila Canaan Messarra

Engaged employees are a critical asset in any business. This is largely because engaged employees tend to proffer innovative solutions to complex problems in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Engaged employees are a critical asset in any business. This is largely because engaged employees tend to proffer innovative solutions to complex problems in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between engagement and innovation as moderated by the use of 360-degree evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey targeting employees in Lebanon solicited their perceptions of 360-degree evaluation, engagement and innovative behaviors along with a statement as to whether their firm used 360-degree evaluations or not. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the moderating effect of 360-degree evaluations on the latent variables of engagement and three facets of innovation.

Findings

SEM results show that 360-degree evaluations serve to enhance engaged employees’ innovative work behavior. However, ideation (creation and implementation) behaviors are more strongly influenced by the presence of 360-degree evaluation as compared to their “tangible” counterpart (technology and financial resource use).

Research limitations/implications

Respondents selected for this research were randomly sampled employees in Lebanon. A stronger study strategy would be to study paired departments within organizations – one implementing 360-degree evaluation and another not implementing it.

Practical implications

Managers, seeking to engender and strengthen innovative behaviors in engaged employees, should utilize 360-degree evaluation processes. Furthermore, the 360-degree evaluations should be designed to probe both tangible (technology and financial resource use) and intangible (idea generation and implementation) facets of innovation.

Originality/value

This study yields a deeper understanding of the relationship between engagement and innovative behaviors in the workplace along with managerial insights into the design and use of 360-degree evaluation.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2012

Daniel R. Denison, Lindsey M. Kotrba and Nathalie Castaño

How generalizable are 360-degree feedback instruments in different cultures? Research investigating the validity and utility of these instruments across the globe is…

Abstract

How generalizable are 360-degree feedback instruments in different cultures? Research investigating the validity and utility of these instruments across the globe is scarce, yet, extraordinarily important. This chapter investigates the utility of a 360-degree feedback instrument across the globe, as well as how different raters from various cultures perceive leaders.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-002-5

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Christopher Rowe

Considers the benefits and pitfalls of 360‐degree feedback –drawing from experiences at British Petroleum (BP) and current thinkingat British Aerospace (BAe), Brough. A…

4907

Abstract

Considers the benefits and pitfalls of 360‐degree feedback – drawing from experiences at British Petroleum (BP) and current thinking at British Aerospace (BAe), Brough. A distinction is made between “assessment” and “development” (necessary for understanding what appraisal is trying to achieve) and the different forms of appraisal – downward, upward, peer and self – are defined. The BAe Brough appraisal scheme is outlined and reference made to a “Manager as a Developer” training programme where the notion of 360‐degree feedback is being considered. Suggests there are 11 key issues that should be considered when introducing upward appraisal and that most of these also apply to peer appraisal and self appraisal. The BP scheme is used as a model for contrasting the author′s own views and those of his BAe colleagues. Concludes by warning of the dangers associated with 360‐degree feedback and favours, in most instances, an “informal, voluntary, qualitative” approach.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Lauren S. Harris and Karl W. Kuhnert

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between leadership development level (LDL) and leadership effectiveness utilizing 360‐degree feedback scores…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between leadership development level (LDL) and leadership effectiveness utilizing 360‐degree feedback scores. Researchers examine raters' ability to recognize effective leadership practices using a constructive developmental framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach is quantitative and involved data gathered from subject‐object CD interviews and 360‐degree feedback scores collected from individuals enrolled in an executive leadership development program.

Findings

The analysis revealed that LDL predicted leadership effectiveness using the 360‐degree feedback measure across a number of sources including superiors, subordinates, and peers. In addition, researchers reveal that individuals that lead from higher levels are more effective in a number of leadership competencies (e.g. Leading Change, Managing Performance, Creating a Compelling Vision, etc.). Finally, the research demonstrates that superiors and peers can predict leader effectiveness better than subordinates or oneself.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for integrating constructive developmental theory in both the research and practice of leader selection and development is discussed.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies to empirically demonstrate the link between leadership development level and leadership effectiveness using the constructive developmental framework.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Derek Curtis

Suggests that once companies introduce 360‐degree feedback, it becomes an established part of their performance appraisal system. Provides reasons why one‐dimensional…

3121

Abstract

Suggests that once companies introduce 360‐degree feedback, it becomes an established part of their performance appraisal system. Provides reasons why one‐dimensional feedback is often not enough, and how 360‐degree feedback can increase individuals’ awareness of how they are perceived. Lists benefits of the system and discusses what is involved.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Almuth McDowall and Christopher Mabey

The purpose of this paper is to compare four different employee activities, namely developmental appraisal, coaching, 360 degree feedback and development centres, offering…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare four different employee activities, namely developmental appraisal, coaching, 360 degree feedback and development centres, offering a comparative framework and an integration of existing research evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a unifying classification which combines existing dimensions derived from the literature, such as the degree of formality, with further differences or communalities such as the degree of simulation, ownership of data and frequency of occurrence. This leads to a review of the pertinent literature and research evidence for each of the four activities discussed, with particular reference to long‐term outcomes, their social context as well as individual motivation.

Findings

The literature review did not produce equivocal evidence for the effectiveness of any of the four activities. Ratings in appraisals are flawed, whereas their developmental aspect appears dependent on the communication between managers and their charges. Also, there is little evidence on what happens as a result of appraisal interviews in the context of the manager‐employee relationship, and how organizations could best optimize this activity to aid long‐term individual and organizational development.

Practical implications

It is proposed that this classification framework could guide both the implementation and evaluation of diverse activities beyond those reviewed here. This framework may prove effective in making explicit and thus addressing the potentially conflicting expectations for prevalent activities from different parties involved. It is proposed that certain aspects of employee development, such as the employer‐manager relationship may be more suited to investigation through qualitative paradigms, but that ultimately more evidence is needed for long‐term outcomes at different levels (e.g. the individual and the organization).

Originality/value

The paper may help understanding of when, and under what conditions, which particular types of development activities are best suited to meet both individual and organizational requirements.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000