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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Inger Lytje

This article offers a humanistic approach to the development of computer‐based information systems. A theoretical framework for conceiving innovative processes as a whole…

Abstract

This article offers a humanistic approach to the development of computer‐based information systems. A theoretical framework for conceiving innovative processes as a whole is outlined. This approach interprets technology in relation to work, knowledge, and basic values. Within this framework, a methodology of systems development is sketched. This methodology is based on experience obtained through developing knowledge‐based systems for use in language research and teaching. Systems development processes are conceived as thought processes, epistemic processes, communicative processes, and learning processes. It is argued that the experience gained from the language project could be applied to other areas of work.

Details

Office Technology and People, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0167-5710

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Irina Farquhar and Alan Sorkin

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized…

Abstract

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized innovative information technology open architecture design and integrating Radio Frequency Identification Device data technologies and real-time optimization and control mechanisms as the critical technology components of the solution. The innovative information technology, which pursues the focused logistics, will be deployed in 36 months at the estimated cost of $568 million in constant dollars. We estimate that the Systems, Applications, Products (SAP)-based enterprise integration solution that the Army currently pursues will cost another $1.5 billion through the year 2014; however, it is unlikely to deliver the intended technical capabilities.

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The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gordon Wills

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplacelearning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates whatit has already achieved and from this…

Abstract

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplace learning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates what it has already achieved and from this moves on to realize its full potential – in short, the enterprise itself is the key. Examines in successive chapters: the individual manager and questioning insights (Q); the major systems which the enterprise uses to capture and structure its learning; a SWOT analysis of the enterprise′s total learning; action learning, its contribution to the achievement of enterprise growth, and the role of programmed knowledge (P); the Enterprise School of Management (ESM) as a phoenix of enlightenment and effectiveness rising from the ashes of traditional, less effective management training initiatives; and, finally, the practical realization of the action learning dream, as evidenced by emerging examples of successful and profitable implementation worldwide. Concludes with a selection of pertinent abstracts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Ravi Shankar, Sourish Acharia and Alok Baveja

In today's knowledge economy, a major challenge for the managers is to effectively link the knowledge management (KM) initiatives with the ever‐changing organizational

Abstract

Purpose

In today's knowledge economy, a major challenge for the managers is to effectively link the knowledge management (KM) initiatives with the ever‐changing organizational needs. The problem arises due to disjoint strategic alignment between these two, which is mainly due to inappropriate KM framework and adoption of some quick‐fix solutions to achieve business results. Hence, for effective management and utilization of knowledge assets, KM initiative should be dovetailed to link with key organizational goals like new product development (NPD), customer satisfaction and manufacturing excellence. The purpose of this paper is to propose a suitable KM system.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes an approach for KM system development to ensure a fit between the organizational needs during NPD and KM initiatives. Soft system methodology (SSM) has been adopted to design this framework.

Findings

This research identified a list of knowledge‐sharing methods, which help in intra‐level or inter‐level knowledge flow. The proposed framework highlights the hierarchal nature and bi‐directional flow of knowledge. Further, this work observed that there are two additional key enablers to effective knowledge management system – competency and infrastructure.

Research limitations/implications

This work focuses on an auto‐component supplier in India. Therefore, this work is limited by the organizational culture, location, business model and the sector in which this research was done.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that a technical knowledge driven process like NPD has three strategic enablers – technology, people and process. The sustenance of the NPD process is affected by the balance among these enablers. Fundamentally, a comprehensive and integrative framework not only ensures a structured framework but also helps in better adoption due to stakeholders' buy‐in of the process.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Andreas I. Nicolaou

Examines sources of control over information system development decisions. Although past research has examined sources of internal organizational control that were solely…

Abstract

Examines sources of control over information system development decisions. Although past research has examined sources of internal organizational control that were solely determined by technical/rational goals, this article analyzes the symbolic role of social institutions in exerting control over system development decisions. Three regulatory mechanisms, developed by institutional theorists, are used to explain how specific social institutions exert their control. The mechanisms of coercive isomorphism, mimetic isomorphism and normative isomorphism help illustrate the types of social forces that enhance similarity of systems across organizations. Three conditions also are identified which moderate these effects: dependence on external institutions having control over an organization’s resources; unclear performance standards for system development; and interaction patterns during development. These conditions imply that social control would differ greatly according to whether the major influences on the process of system development arise from within the organization or are imposed from external institutions. The examination of symbolic/institutional forces in system development is useful in both the evaluation of system effectiveness and the assessment of the “appropriateness” of managerial interventions in the process. Future research should empirically examine these manifestations of social control and their influence on system development decisions.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

A. Espinosa

To explore the usefulness of the cybernetic approach to support development programs by offering a theoretical framework that helps us to re‐understand development and…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the usefulness of the cybernetic approach to support development programs by offering a theoretical framework that helps us to re‐understand development and measuring systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a summary of Beer's theory for organisational development and measuring systems, shows examples of application in design and implementation of socio‐economic development programs in Colombia, and uses them to explore the usefulness of the approach in this field.

Findings

Analysis of the reported examples shows a clear indication of the usefulness of Beer's approach to design and measure development programs. It reveals an important field for applied research that could benefit from further applications of the approach.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences analysed here showed the strength or alliances between government, universities and development agencies, for applied research. It makes clear that more long‐term oriented projects are required to fully implement innovative approaches like the one described.

Practical implications

Applying a cybernetic approach in this field implies changing from top‐down to bottom‐up design; wider involvement of stakeholders to agree on critical measurements; changes from emphasis in technological and managerial improvements, to improvements in learning and self‐control tools for the developing communities.

Originality/value

Even if there has been agreement on the convenience of experimenting with more holistic approaches to socio‐economic development, few researchers show the potential of the cybernetic approach, as this paper does.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jeremy Rose

Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) has long been involved in information systems development through the medium of action research. Its social constructivist paradigm and…

Abstract

Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) has long been involved in information systems development through the medium of action research. Its social constructivist paradigm and managerial focus distinguish it from most software engineering development approaches. Checkland’s underlying view of systems development, however, is heavily influenced by traditional waterfall models – something of a contradiction. This paper uses recent developments in SSM to develop a more appropriate systems development concept: the interaction‐transformation‐interaction (ITI) model. The model views systems development primarily as a social and managerial task, rather than a technical one. It was successfully used (in conjunction with developed forms of SSM which incorporate analysis based on structuration theory) to structure the development of an intranet in a university department. The experience led to a further series of reflections on the model.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Antoinette Kieback, Horst Lichter, Matthias Schneider‐Hufschmidt and Heinz Züllighoven

Presents five case studies of industrial software projectsspecifically involving prototyping. Designates projects ranging from 240person‐years to two person‐years…

Abstract

Presents five case studies of industrial software projects specifically involving prototyping. Designates projects ranging from 240 person‐years to two person‐years involving large industrial corporations to small/medium software manufacturers. Analyses the benefits and limitations of prototyping. Concludes that prototyping is conducive to the quality of the product and the development process, particularly when used in conjunction with an evolutionary development strategy and when all parties are aware of the benefits and limitations.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Arif Hassan, Junaidah Hashim and Ahmad Zaki Hj Ismail

The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in HRD system, and to examine the role of HRD practices on employees' development climate and quality orientation in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 239 employees belonging to eight organizations (four of them ISO certified) responded to a questionnaire which measured the following variables: career system, work planning system, development system, self renewal system, and HRD system.

Findings

Results indicated large inter‐organizational differences in HRD practices. In general, however, employees' ratings were moderate. ISO certified companies, compared to others, obtained higher means on some HRD variables. Organizations with better learning, training and development systems, reward and recognition, and information systems promoted human resource development climate. Quality orientation was predicted by career planning, performance guidance and development, role efficacy, and reward and recognition systems.

Research limitations/implications

Comparison between ISO and non‐ISO certified companies did yield some significant differences, yet it was difficult to conclude that the differences were due to ISO certification alone as organizations in the sample were not matched.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by HR practitioners and scholars in building management concerns and advocacy for better HRD systems and practices.

Originality/value

Very little empirical knowledge is available on this subject from transitional economies like Malaysia. The study makes a modest attempt in that direction.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1988

Yash P. Gupta

The challenge of reducing the development time while increasing the quality of new information systems is becoming more urgent with the growing demands on data processing…

Abstract

The challenge of reducing the development time while increasing the quality of new information systems is becoming more urgent with the growing demands on data processing (DP) services. Structured methodologies for system development provide a means to improve stagnant DP professionals' productivity, overcome communication problems and reduce the risks of systems failure. These methodologies can only be implemented with active management participation and changes in the roles of users and DP professionals. In this article we examine the above issues and suggest methods of how management can facilitate the implementation of these methodologies.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 88 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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