Search results

1 – 10 of over 51000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

C. N. Bezuidenhout

Not many researchers have attempted to numerically quantify a supply chain’s degree of leanness or agility. Although focusing predominantly on food, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Not many researchers have attempted to numerically quantify a supply chain’s degree of leanness or agility. Although focusing predominantly on food, the purpose of this paper is to propose a simple and universal methodology to quantify the degrees of leanness and agility at any point within any supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Daily processing capacities of stochastic model runs and real supply chain data were projected onto a standardized Euclidean surface. Indexes that calculate, amongst others, the agility, leanness, baseline production and ceiling conditions were derived.

Findings

The indexes were often well correlated across the various supply chains. Leanness correlates negatively with agility, as can be expected, however, these attributes do not stand opposed to each other. Most supply chains seem to exhibit both lean and agile attributes simultaneously. Sugar, various types of tomatoes, avocado and onion supply chains are discussed and compared. Although a large amount of data were analysed, there exists an opportunity to widen this study significantly.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique and simple approach to quantify the degree of supply chain leanness and agility. Although these terms are often used, only a few authors have made attempts to quantify these attributes and in most cases the approaches are relatively cumbersome. The relatively simple indexes create an opportunity for supply chain management to measure, evaluate and communicate their strategies along the supply chain and between different chains.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Marco Tieman

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an obligation for Muslims.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research paper is based on in‐depth interviews to better understand what is Halal, the Islamic sources that are essential for Halal supply chains, and identify the guidelines and principles which are essential for the integrity of Halal supply chains.

Findings

Halal supply chain management is based on avoiding direct contact with Haram, addressing the risk of contamination and ensuring that it is in line with the perception of the Muslim consumer. In particular, the product and market characteristics are important variables in the supply chain management of Halal supply chains. Further empirical research is needed to measure the perception of the Muslim consumer. A better understanding is also required into the principles in organising the Halal supply chain for different markets (Muslim and non‐Muslim countries). There is a need for a Halal supply chain model that is able to describe and optimise Halal supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

Since this paper is an exploratory study, it provides some insights into the considerations in organising Halal supply chains. However, further qualitative and quantitative research is needed in order to provide the industry with concrete tools to design effective Halal supply chains.

Practical implications

In response to the logistics industry that started with Halal logistics solutions, the Halal certified food industries needs to know whether and how to start with a Halal supply chain approach. This paper presented key considerations to address in organising effective Halal supply chains.

Social implications

Halal in non‐Muslim countries is not very well understood, where in logistics only the aspect of avoiding of contact with Haram is addressed mainly through packaging. This article presents a better understanding of Halal and the application of Halal in supply chain management.

Originality/value

There is a lack of academic research in Halal logistics and supply chain management. This exploratory research provides some basic fundamentals on the supply chain management of Halal products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rameshwar Dubey and Angappa Gunasekaran

– The purpose of this paper is to identify sustainable supply chain skill and propose a conceptual training framework for sustainable supply chain talent.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify sustainable supply chain skill and propose a conceptual training framework for sustainable supply chain talent.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have used exhaustive literature review of extant literature published in academic journals, reputable reports, trade magazines, books and monographs. The authors further consulted leading experts from reputable bodies to further finalize the sustainable supply chain skills matrix and check the content validity of the constructs of our proposed conceptual framework.

Findings

The sustainable supply chain skill matrix has been identified and a conceptual framework has been proposed. The authors further outlined the future research directions.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper based on the literature review and analysis. This offers opportunities for empirical research.

Practical implications

This paper will alert companies to focus on developing talents that would help to achieve sustainable supply chain.

Social implications

Better talents lead to better support for sustainable supply chains.

Originality/value

The present study is unique in terms of scope and its contribution to theory of supply chain management and operations management and human resource management practice. The study has identified the sustainable supply chain skill matrix and proposed a conceptual training framework for sustainable supply chain talent.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Richard Oloruntoba and Richard Gray

The purpose of this article is to investigate the nature of the humanitarian aid supply chain and discuss the extent to which certain business supply chain concepts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate the nature of the humanitarian aid supply chain and discuss the extent to which certain business supply chain concepts, particularly supply chain agility, are relevant to humanitarian aid.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies elements of good practice in conventional business supply chains and applies them to the humanitarian aid supply chain, making use of published practice‐based literature and web sites associated with humanitarian aid. Particular emphasis is placed on the concept of “agility” in supply chain management. A model of an agile supply chain for humanitarian aid is developed.

Findings

Humanitarian supply chains have similarities with business supply chains, but there are significant differences. Many humanitarian supply chains have a short and unstable existence with an inadequate link between emergency aid and longer‐term developmental aid. Unlike many business supply chains, typical emergency aid appeals assign inventory to a particular destination at the supply chain source.

Practical implications

This research note is a starting‐point for empirical studies to test the agile humanitarian supply chain model.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to integrate humanitarian aid practice with concepts in the academic supply chain literature. In particular, proposes that humanitarian donors need convincing of the value of supply chain processes.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ergün Kaya and Murat Azaltun

Supply chain management (SCM) has become important in the service sector nowadays, because customer satisfaction is dependent on the efficiency of supply chain activities…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain management (SCM) has become important in the service sector nowadays, because customer satisfaction is dependent on the efficiency of supply chain activities. Hotels are operations where personal guest satisfaction is a major priority. A large and diverse range of supply factors are gathered according to the requirements of guests, and then service is provided. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of SCM and information system (IS) in five‐star hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from senior management and relevant department authorities of five‐star hotels in Istanbul by asking them open‐ended questions. The findings were evaluated with descriptive analysis and different conditions of usage information systems in SCM were presented and then issues were determined.

Findings

The findings were evaluated in five groups; four of them being: First, purchasing, inventory management, warehousing, customer relationship and service production processes in these enterprises are mainly being carried out by conventional methods. Second, internet is being used instead of fax as a means of communication in the supply chain. Third, respondents say that the use of information systems is reflected in the speed, reliability, easy access, low cost applications and time saving within the supply chain process. Fourth, Netsis program is the most frequently used and the advantage of its ERP applications are also being used.

Research limitations/implications

The findings were evaluated by descriptive analysis method. Because of the low number of participants, statistical analysis does not give meaningful results. Consistency of responses given by participants is tested by the investigation of cross relations between the questions.

Originality/value

In this paper, the supply chain structure in hotels, and supply chain information systems are being examined through the interactions of the members. To achieve this goal, the relationship between information systems and the supply chain structure has been established and the role of information systems in SCM is determined with the help of corporate information systems.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Stefan A. Seuring

The intention of the paper is to present recent developments in German‐based supply chain‐controlling literature (management accounting in supply chains) and place them in…

Abstract

Purpose

The intention of the paper is to present recent developments in German‐based supply chain‐controlling literature (management accounting in supply chains) and place them in a context of recent lines of research on supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken in the paper is a conceptually‐based review of related publications.

Findings

The study finds that supply chain controlling has picked up on controlling concepts, i.e. rationality, coordination and information, which are transferred to the meta‐level of a supply chain. This is linked to recent debates in supply chain management literature, which are captured as the performance frontier of a supply chain, the coordination and integration needs of a supply chain and the information needed to manage and control a supply chain.

Practical implications

Management accounting instruments need to be applied on a supply chain level more and more.

Originality/value

The paper summarizes research contributions on supply chain controlling published in German and puts them in an international context.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Woon Kian Ng, Rajesh Piplani and S. Viswanathan

End‐user demand information suffers from delay and distortion as it moves upstream in a supply chain. Co‐ordination between organisations in the supply chain, through…

Abstract

End‐user demand information suffers from delay and distortion as it moves upstream in a supply chain. Co‐ordination between organisations in the supply chain, through sharing of demand information, is a possible solution to counter this distortion. Modelling and analysing supply chains, however, is not an easy task, as the supply chains contain multiple echelons and are faced with uncertain demand and lead‐times. For multi‐echelon supply chains adopting different inventory and forecasting policies at the echelon level, simulation is the most appropriate analysis tool. In this paper, we describe the development of a simulation workbench for modelling and analysing multi‐echelon supply chains. The workbench facilitates study of inventory and forecasting policies practised by the echelons, and models different information exchange mechanisms adopted by them. An experiment conducted, to test the workbench and demonstrate its capabilities, confirms that the workbench is a useful tool for gaining valuable insights into information exchange in a particular supply chain.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Zhenxin Yu, Hong Yan and T.C. Edwin Cheng

The power of information technology can be harnessed to help supply chain members establish partnerships for better supply chain system performance. Supply chain

Abstract

The power of information technology can be harnessed to help supply chain members establish partnerships for better supply chain system performance. Supply chain partnerships can mitigate deficiencies associated with decentralized control and reduce the “bullwhip effect”. This study illustrates the benefits of supply chain partnerships based on information sharing. For a decentralized supply chain comprising a manufacturer and a retailer, we derive the members’ optimal inventory policies under different information sharing scenarios. We show that increasing information sharing among the members in a decentralized supply chain will lead to Pareto improvement in the performance of the entire chain. Specifically, the supply chain members can reap benefits in terms of reductions in inventory levels and cost savings from forming partnerships with one another. A case study is provided for illustration.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Frenck Waage

This chapter shows how the forecasting and the planning functions in a supply chain can be organized so they will yield optimal forecasts for an entire supply chain. We…

Abstract

This chapter shows how the forecasting and the planning functions in a supply chain can be organized so they will yield optimal forecasts for an entire supply chain. We achieve this result by replacing the process of generating forecasts with that of making optimal coordinated supply chain decisions. The ideal performance for a supply chain is to have the flows of materials perfectly synchronized with the demand rate for the finished product that the chain produces. When the equality is achieved, we have a pure “demand pull” supply chain. This ideal is difficult to achieve because forecasting and decision making in supply chains are typically decentralized and forecasting and planning uncoordinated. Creating a competitive advantage for the finished product requires achieving the ideal. The opposite, not achieving the ideal, leads to uncoordinated forecasts and decisions that trigger unintended buildup of inventories, lost sales and the bullwhip effects, slowness and high costs.

This chapter shows how (1) we can achieve the ideal synchronous supply chain flows by using temporal linear programs; (2) then, we guide each individual supply chain member company in developing his optimal operations plan to guide him in executing his part in the supply chain plan. The result from the two factors: the entire supply chain will achieve the ideal flow rates.

Details

Advances in Business and Management Forecasting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-787-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Archie Lockamy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of V‐A‐T analysis in the management of supply chain networks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of V‐A‐T analysis in the management of supply chain networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a conceptual overview of V‐A‐T analysis as a procedure for categorizing manufacturing facilities, and explores the use of V‐A‐T analysis as a technique for the management of supply chain networks.

Findings

There are several challenges to the effective management of supply chain networks. However, organizations can overcome these challenges by understanding the nature of network control points as revealed through the application of V‐A‐T analysis on their supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is conceptual in nature and must be validated through empirical research studies.

Practical Implications

The concepts presented can be used by supply chain professionals to increase the likelihood of effective supply chain management within their organizations, and by supply chain researchers to further explore the use of V‐A‐T analysis as a tool for examining supply chain networks.

Originality/value

The paper makes a start in filling a void in the literature concerning how V‐A‐T analysis can be used as a tool to facilitate improved supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 51000