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Mustafa Avcın and Hasret Balcıoğlu

This study contributes to the existing literature that corporate governance consist of internal and external governance behavior which refers to the complementarity of the…

Abstract

This study contributes to the existing literature that corporate governance consist of internal and external governance behavior which refers to the complementarity of the elements of (1) competing values framework and (2) corporate legality framework theories and proper orientation in the provisions of the elements leads to a good corporate power in the modern legal environment. A questionnaire is designed, a survey is conducted based on the constructed corporate governance model in the study, which investigates the evolutionary background of the elements with the view of establishing the right corporate culture and corporate legality behavior. The empirical results revealed that there is a positive linear relationship between the elements of corporate culture provisions with internal governance behavior and a significant positive association between the elements of corporate legality provisions with external governance behavior. The model does not take into account long-term external factors. Therefore, measuring corporate governance may not be an easy task and may not be suitable for specific countries that have strong legal systems and corporate ownership. The elements in the model are practical to implement and facilitates corporate to improve shareholder involvement and governance reporting and hence prevent failure. The constructed model span almost every attribute embedding high quality corporate social responsibility and corporate governance for corporate to identify areas for improvement and contributes to existing corporate governance literature that, connecting corporate culture and corporate legality behavior positively affect financial markets and firm performance.

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Article

Marie-Fleur Lobrij, Muel Kaptein and Mijntje Lückerath-Rovers

This study aims to provide insight into the current incorporation of corporate culture in national corporate governance codes. The authors identify three levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insight into the current incorporation of corporate culture in national corporate governance codes. The authors identify three levels of incorporation for each of the following three dimensions: layers of corporate culture (the “what”), the alignment of corporate culture in the organization (the “for whom”) and the board’s roles regarding corporate culture (the “how”).

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the extent to which national codes have incorporated corporate culture, the authors used a sample of 88 national corporate governance codes. The authors performed a content analysis of these codes using a computer-aided text analysis program. The first step involved the identification of dimensions of corporate culture per national code. These dimensions were then assessed based on three levels of incorporation. Finally, the authors ranked national codes with similar levels of incorporation per dimension and aggregated the dimensions.

Findings

The data show that five of the 88 national corporate governance codes that the authors analysed scored the highest level in all three dimensions of corporate culture.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide an overview of what national corporate governance codes say about corporate culture. The authors address two gaps in the existing literature. First, the authors develop and use a richer conceptualization of how corporate culture can be addressed in national corporate governance codes. Second, the authors analyse these corporate governance codes worldwide.

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Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article

Farid Elashmawi

This article introduces a process that helps companies define and develop their current and future corporate cultures. Working with the top executives within a company…

Abstract

This article introduces a process that helps companies define and develop their current and future corporate cultures. Working with the top executives within a company, the process enables participants to identify their internal organization’s subcultures as well as the culture of the external business environment. The program identifies the core corporate values that need to be enhanced in order to achieve success in this environment. The program helps participating managers develop action plans to achieve these new corporate values, and company‐wide cultural cement programs are implemented throughout the organization to ensure continued business success.

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European Business Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article

Richard L. Brinkman

This paper analyzes and explains the dynamics of corporate evolution in the context of anthropologist conception of culture. The multinational corporate characterizing the…

Abstract

This paper analyzes and explains the dynamics of corporate evolution in the context of anthropologist conception of culture. The multinational corporate characterizing the Galbraithian world, as The New Industrial State, dominates the current economic landscape. The conception of corporate culture and its dynamics lays bare the locus of corporate power which resides in the control of corporate technology. Granting this dynamic, the question then arises concerning the agency which controls the application and use of this cumulated corporate power. Corporate power and policy in the USA are currently directed by a social institution in the form of profits without social responsibility. This policy is manifest in a “low road” of cost reduction. Such a policy direction exacerbates rather than ameliorates the current economic malaise now characterizing the US economy.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Amoako Kwarteng and Felix Aveh

The study aims to empirically examine the impact of organizational culture on accounting information system and corporate performance of firms in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to empirically examine the impact of organizational culture on accounting information system and corporate performance of firms in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted using top corporate executives of diverse firms from different industrial sectors. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM) and a further post hoc test was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Findings

The study demonstrates that there is a statistically significant relationship between organizational culture on accounting information system and corporate performance. The results indicate that mission, adaptability and consistency dimensions of organizational culture were significant and also accounting information system influences corporate performance. Moreover, there are significant differences in the means of accounting information system on different industrial sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the extent that only overall profitability was used to measure performance. In addition, the study did not control for leadership style and organizational structure in the relationships. The implication of the study is that ethical culture-shaped accounting information system and financial reporting practice which ultimately leads to corporate performance.

Originality/value

Ghana is a developing country where structures and institutions are not well developed. Businesses and organizational forms are now beginning to pick up; therefore, organizational culture, accounting information systems and their impact on corporate performance are not well documented. These are all new phenomena in this part of the globe. The context of Ghana in terms of national culture that feeds into organizational culture, institutions, quality and application of accounting information is entirely different from that of advanced countries. The study therefore contributes to the extant literature by applying the constructs of organizational culture, accounting information system and corporate performance within a developing country perspective.

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Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article

Zabid Abdul Rashid, Murali Sambasivan and Juliana Johari

This paper examines the influence of corporate culture and organisational commitment on financial performance in Malaysian companies. Based on the work of Deshpande and…

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of corporate culture and organisational commitment on financial performance in Malaysian companies. Based on the work of Deshpande and Farley on corporate cultural types and Allen and Meyer on organisational commitment, a structured questionnaire was developed and self‐administered to managers in Malaysian companies. A total of 202 managers in public listed companies participated in the study. The results show that there is a significant correlation between corporate culture and organisational commitment. Both corporate culture type and organisational commitment have an influence on the financial performance of these companies. The implications of the study are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Andres Sousa‐Poza, Halvard Nystrom and Henry Wiebe

Explores the impact of cross‐cultural differences on the facilitating effects of corporate culture on the implementation of total quality management (TQM). Measures…

Abstract

Explores the impact of cross‐cultural differences on the facilitating effects of corporate culture on the implementation of total quality management (TQM). Measures corporate culture using the competing values model pioneered by Quinn and Rohrbaugh. Measures implementation levels of TQM using a questionnaire developed at the University of Missouri‐Rolla by Wu. Applies these measures to 133 manufacturing companies in the USA, Switzerland and South Africa to investigate the relationship between corporate cultures and the implementation of TQM. Using canonical correlation analysis on the two variable sets (corporate culture and TQM), identifies the relationships between corporate culture and TQM for each region. The results show that, in each region, several distinct relationships between the dimensions of TQM implementation and corporate culture exist. Also determines that the relationships differ between the regions, implying that the application of TQM should take into account ethnological cultures. Makes conclusions and recommendations for management action.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article

Susan Kitchell and Charles S. Mayer

In the 1990s, computerized manufacturing equipment vendors willcontinue to operate within an increasingly competitive environment astechnologies mature and product variety…

Abstract

In the 1990s, computerized manufacturing equipment vendors will continue to operate within an increasingly competitive environment as technologies mature and product variety proliferates. Against this climate, recommends a critical marketing tool that offers manufacturers a sustainable market advantage, namely, serving the customer′s corporate culture for market gain. Depicts a systematic approach for computerized manufacturing equipment vendors to observe, interpret and monitor their customers′ corporate culture, and enables them to formulate marketing strategies based on this knowledge. Also presents corporate cultural norms which characterize intensive users of computer‐manufacturing equipment.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

IpKin Anthony Wong and Jennifer Hong Gao

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employees’ affective commitment through the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employees’ affective commitment through the mediating role of perceived corporate culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of self-administered survey. A total of 379 complete responses were obtained from tourism and hospitality organizations in China. The proposed relationships were tested using structural equation modeling in four nested models.

Findings

Results show that CSR to employees and CSR to customers are fully mediated by employee development, harmony and customer orientation of the corporate culture, while CSR to stakeholders is partially mediated.

Practical implications

The findings also suggest that the literature should reconsider how CSR initiatives could pinpoint a specific dimension in developing loyal employees. This study also shows that employees are social actors who seek a corporate culture that best suits their self-interest; hence, they are more committed to an organization particularly in respect to employee development and social harmony.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature by showing that not all CSR efforts would directly lead to employee commitment. It shows that the CSR-to-employee and CSR-to-customer dimensions play the most salient roles in nurturing a corporate culture that is perceived to focus on employee development, harmony, customers and innovation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Richard L. Brinkman and June E. Brinkman

The Berle and Means thesis focuses on a managerial revolution in which corporate control came to be transferred from owners to managers. Currently, it is arguable that…

Abstract

The Berle and Means thesis focuses on a managerial revolution in which corporate control came to be transferred from owners to managers. Currently, it is arguable that control of corporate policy has shifted back to owners in what has come to be called “investor capitalism.” Stock market manipulators, as owners, have currently come to assert increased levels of control over CEO autonomy. This empirical reality appears in a vicious circle culminating in excessive CEO profits. The result has been to give support to a basic Veblenian assertion that imbecile business institutions hold sway to direct and dominate the economic process. In this process, the making of money rather than the production of goods serviceable for basic human needs have increasingly come to prevail over the US economy and culture.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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