Search results

1 – 10 of over 163000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Edward J. Thomas

Useful lessons can be learned by European universities from therapidly expanding knowledge of continuing education and training acrossthe continent. This knowledge will…

Abstract

Useful lessons can be learned by European universities from the rapidly expanding knowledge of continuing education and training across the continent. This knowledge will help universities in Europe to develop their continuing education provisions. In the longer term this development is likely to lead to major changes within the universities themselves.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

Janine Golden

Leadership development is a significant issue in public libraries and library administrators debate, among other topics, how to achieve it for the middle-level manager. At…

Abstract

Leadership development is a significant issue in public libraries and library administrators debate, among other topics, how to achieve it for the middle-level manager. At the present time, library organizations use leadership and management workshops, seminars, and institutes to assist with managers’ organizational learning processes. Current literature indicates that additional strategies such as career planning, mentoring, networking, acquiring adequate qualifications and experience, professional involvement, and continuing education are used not only to facilitate middle-level managers’ career development, but also to help organizations fill the leadership gaps within their ranks.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-403-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Evia O.W. Wong

Sustainable development is considered by many to be an essential direction for our world to move towards. To educate for sustainability is not an easy task and it is…

Abstract

Sustainable development is considered by many to be an essential direction for our world to move towards. To educate for sustainability is not an easy task and it is essential for all the education practitioners to make their contribution. It is important to accept and adapt changes for sustainable development, and continuing education sector itself has undergone dramatic changes in development since the formulation of the concept by the United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organization in the 1960s. Coping with the metamorphosis of society and its increasing demand for multi‐disciplinary, continuing education in the tertiary institution is a continuous learning process on its own. Leadership empowerment becomes one of the sharpening tools for bringing about the change in the institutions. Looks at an integral and practice‐oriented approach of one of the subject areas to introducing sustainable development into continuing education in Hong Kong as well as to explore the significance of leadership empowerment in bringing change and learning to the continuing education in the tertiary education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Elizabeth Doney

Reports a study which investigated the attitudes of information and library staff in two parts of the ILS sector, the business and the academic, to continuing professional…

Abstract

Reports a study which investigated the attitudes of information and library staff in two parts of the ILS sector, the business and the academic, to continuing professional development. Interviews were held with 17 ILS workers, including training/development staff. Experience of in‐house and external CPD activities, attitudes to professional organisations and CPD, views on CPD and career development, and on the Library Association’s Framework for Continuing Professional Development, were among the areas explored. Attitudes of staff to the introduction of a compulsory CPD scheme for the ILS sector were also investigated. The findings show that ILS staff have a considerable commitment to both the principles and practices of CPD. However, very few staff reported using the Library Association’s Framework for Continuing Professional Development, and levels of support for the idea of a compulsory scheme of CPD for the ILS sector were not high.

Details

Library Management, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Laurel Anne Clyde

Discusses the papers presented at the Fifth World Conference on Continuing Professional Development for the Library and Information Professions organised by the Round…

Abstract

Discusses the papers presented at the Fifth World Conference on Continuing Professional Development for the Library and Information Professions organised by the Round Table on Continuing Professional Development of IFLA held August 2002. They included theoretical discussions, research reports, descriptions of best practice, case studies, project evaluations and state‐of‐the‐art reviews presented by library and information professionals.

Details

Library Management, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Paula Sobiechowska and Maire Maisch

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the key features of a work‐based, competency‐led curriculum model of continuing professional development for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the key features of a work‐based, competency‐led curriculum model of continuing professional development for social workers and to present a revised model, which addresses the issues that arise for learners pursuing continuing professional and academic development (CPD) within a work‐based curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflections on and evaluation of both undergraduate and post graduate, work‐based curricula with employers, tutors and learners led to significant revisions to further models of work‐based learning for CPD. These changes are presented in the form of a revised model, which addresses the tensions between work‐based, competency‐led curricula and the issues that arise for learners pursuing continuing professional and academic development in full‐time employment.

Findings

The paper makes explicit the struggle in developing and delivering work‐based, competency‐led curricula while also trying to address the pragmatic issues that arise for learners pursuing professional and academic development in full‐time employment. In order to resolve some of the tensions a revised model of CPD in the workplace is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on the evaluation of two CPD programmes in post‐qualifying social work at one university, over a ten‐year period. However in this sense the study is limited to the experience of the tutors in a particular context.

Practical implications

The importance of considering the workplace as a learning environment for CPD is emphasised, as are the tensions that arise for learners meeting the demands of academia in full‐time employment.

Originality/value

This paper presents valuable lessons learned from ten years of pedagogic experience developing and delivering work‐based CPD programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Ina Fourie

The purpose of this contribution is to encourage library and information (LIS) professionals to draw on the initiatives by Carol Kuhlthau to align information seeking with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this contribution is to encourage library and information (LIS) professionals to draw on the initiatives by Carol Kuhlthau to align information seeking with learning theories and new roles for intermediaries. Considering the vast array of developments in information communication technology (ICT), and the challenges and pressures for continuing professional development (CPD) and reflection, it seems timely to encourage experimentation with the ideas of Kuhlthau on Zones of Intervention and Lev Vygotsky on Zones of Proximal Development (ZPD), as means to become au fait with these theories, ideas and related research, and to apply these theories and ideas on a practical level to offer opportunities for the continuing professional development of LIS professionals with specific reference to ICT, and to eventually also impact on the training of users.

Design/methodology/approach

This contribution will be written against the background of research from information literacy, information behaviour (including information seeking), the learning theory of Vygotsky on Zones of Proximal Development, and continuing professional development.

Findings

Although the information seeking process (ISP) model of Kuhlthau is widely cited, the idea of Zones of Intervention which she developed from the work of Vygotsky does unfortunately not feature strongly in the LIS literature. Considering the literature on Zones of Proximal Development, it can, however, hold much potential for LIS professionals to align support with information seeking with professional (optimal) development – especially if using the focus (Zones of Intervention and Zones of Proximal Development) as a means to become au fait, and if initially taking a more practical and relaxed approach as point of departure.

Originality/value

Relatively few publications on Zones of Intervention and Zones of Proximal Development appear in the LIS literature. None of these are to the author's knowledge, aligned to the continuing professional development of LIS professionals on a practical level or with regard to fully exploiting ICT developments.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Aira Lepik

The growth in responsibility of librarians under the country′schanged conditions requires their high‐quality professional education,flexible continuing education and…

Abstract

The growth in responsibility of librarians under the country′s changed conditions requires their high‐quality professional education, flexible continuing education and professional development at all levels. Offers an overview of librarians′ professional training in Estonia, its traditions and possibilities today. Estonian library assistants study at the Viljandi College of Culture: degree courses in library and information sciences (LIS) are offered by the Tallinn Pedagogical University, including Master′s and doctoral degrees. Gives a detailed account of the undergraduate LIS curriculum at the Tallinn Pedagogical University. Systematic continuing education is a necessity because of developments in information technology and because of rapid changes in Estonian economic and social life. Touches on local and state‐wide continuing education activities. Undertakings by the Librarians Education Board in educating library staff without formal LIS education are an integral part of librarians′ continuing education and retraining. In order to disseminate information about Estonian libraries in the world professional community, our librarians must be aware of developments elsewhere. Speaks about the return of Estonian librarians into international professional organizations (IFLA, co‐operation with Baltic libraries, etc.) Deals with the prospects for Estonian librarians in co‐operation with international professional organizations (IATUL, ABDOS, IAML, IASL, etc.) in a more detailed way, including their participation in educational and developmental projects of other countries.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Aleksandra Horvat

Prior to the recent establishment of the Training Centre for Continuing Education of Librarians, training of librarians in Croatia had been organized sporadically by…

Abstract

Prior to the recent establishment of the Training Centre for Continuing Education of Librarians, training of librarians in Croatia had been organized sporadically by several organizations in the field. For the majority of librarians, however, professional education could have easily ended with diploma, because there has been no legal obligation to attend any form of further education. The first attempt to establish a consistent pattern of continuing education for librarians in the whole country was made when four major organizations in the library field, the National and University Library, Zagreb City Libraries, Croatian Library Association and Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy, signed an agreement on the establishment of the Training Centre. The programme of the Centre was successfully launched in February 2002. However, further activities of the Centre might become seriously hampered by the lack of legal provision for continuing education that makes it difficult for librarians to obtain leave, lack of funding allocated in library budgets for the education, and the impossibility of relating professional development to professional promotion.

Details

New Library World, vol. 105 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Davoud Masoumi, Javad Hatami and Javad Pourkaremi

The purpose of this paper is to focus on mapping the ways in which HE institutions enhance faculty members’ professional development. More precisely, by introducing a case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on mapping the ways in which HE institutions enhance faculty members’ professional development. More precisely, by introducing a case from one of the well-established universities in Iran, the authors aim to examine the focus of faculty development (FD) activities and how FD is conducted, with a view to shedding light on the challenges of and disparities between faculty roles and areas of FD in higher education (HE) in Iran as a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to explore and map the characteristics of FD and analyse the trends that Iranian HE institutions are experiencing in this area, a sequential explanatory multiple sources design, consisting of two distinct phases, was implemented (Creswell, 2012). In this design, the documents regarding the faculty professional development (decisions, agreements, The Job Structure Memorandum, and relevant documents and policies at the Iranian Ministry of Science, Research and Technology and the studied HE institution) were analysed first. Next, field records were collected by means of a series semi-structured interviews with faculty members in the given HE setting.

Findings

The analysis of the collected data brought to the surface three themes, namely, FD: policies and procedures, faculties professional development in practice, and associated challenges and future prospects. These initial findings helped to understand if and how FD activities occur as well as map the challenges and complexities in faculties’ CPD in Iranian HE. Further, it discusses possible solutions to develop relevant and practical professional development.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is partly limited to a group of faculty members’ experiences and reflections on FD in one Iranian HE institution. Conducting additional surveys and observations with a large sample of the faculties and students may verify and consolidate the findings of the study and contribute to further insights on the ways faculties’ professional development can be transformed.

Practical implications

Taking into account the findings of the study, a dynamic framework for continued professional development of faculties in Iran is developed.

Originality/value

The findings of the study present valuable insights into the FD procedures, challenges and paradoxes that seem to shape FD in Iranian HE institutions. Moreover, the findings indicated much-needed structural modifications to simplify and harmonise the policies and procedures to harness profession development. To conclude, the initiatives and action plans that may contribute to FD and reshape the Iranian HE landscape is discussed. The applications and implications are also relevant for similar HE systems in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 163000