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Article

Hailan Guo and Xiaoling Xu

Humanitarian relief organisations such as charities count on donations to provide assistance to people in need when disasters occur. In the UK, about 11,200 charity shops…

Abstract

Purpose

Humanitarian relief organisations such as charities count on donations to provide assistance to people in need when disasters occur. In the UK, about 11,200 charity shops collect second-hand goods from donors to raise funds for their parent charity to support target beneficiaries. As their numbers increase, charity shops are finding it difficult to secure good quality stock. Furthermore, they may need to plan ahead to secure sufficient stock when the economy experiences a downturn. This paper identifies the charity shop's role and its donation flow in the multi-tier supply chain and empirically assesses the barriers that influence intention to donate with a mixed-methods approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to explore the charity shop's role within the multi-tier supply chain, this study begins with a literature review and then develops a conceptual model. In order to empirically evaluate the barriers that influence intention to donate, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 charity shop managers and collected 222 usable questionnaires from donors. The interpretive structural modelling (ISM) approach was applied to examine the interrelationship among barriers and rank their priority.

Findings

This paper identifies ten significant barriers that influence intention to donate: lack of good quality items for donation; lack of information on how charity shops make use of donations; lack of familiarity with the donation process; lack of information of what items can be accepted by charity shops; lack of awareness of the impact that donations make; the difficulty of being available at the scheduled times for charity shops' free pick-up services; the difficulty of donating during shops' opening hours; the difficulty of finding parking to access charity shops; and living too far away from charity shops. In particular, the questionnaires' results indicate that lack of good quality items is the most significant barrier. This is also reflected in the ISM model, and thus needs more attention.

Practical implications

The results are very useful for charity shops themselves to understand current barriers to securing good quality stock and to develop potential stock-securing interventions based on these barriers' priority.

Originality/value

Although charity shops have been investigated by several researchers, their supply chain remains insufficiently explored. This paper fills this gap by identifying the charity shop's role and its donation flow in the supply chain and by empirically assessing the supply-side barriers with a mixed-methods approach.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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Article

Rosalien Alexandra van’t Foort-Diepeveen, Aikaterini Argyrou and Tineke Lambooy

This paper aims to analyze the barriers discussed in the extant literature as to why women are underrepresented in the corporate top and explains how these barriers

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the barriers discussed in the extant literature as to why women are underrepresented in the corporate top and explains how these barriers interrelate. An understanding of the interrelatedness of the barriers can help develop suitable and effective measures to improve women’s representation.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic review method was applied. The search resulted in 51 relevant academic articles from multiple disciplines which were used for the analysis.

Findings

Barriers identified include gender stereotypes, bias in recruitment and promotion, devaluation of women, masculine and long-hours organizational culture, work-family issues and the lack of professional support. The interrelatedness of these barriers is analyzed by means of a conceptual framework.

Research limitations/implications

The adopted method requires the use of search engines and search terms and consequently relevant articles may have been overlooked. The study is geographically demarcated to Europe and, hence is only applicable to developing suitable and effective measures in a European context. More research is needed into which measures are appropriate and effective to overcome the barriers identified.

Practical implications

The insights can be used by companies to foster gender equality and by companies and governments to develop appropriate and effective measures to overcome these barriers.

Originality/value

This review contributes to the literature by uncovering the interrelatedness of the barriers. Understanding the interrelatedness is crucial for developing appropriate measures to overcome the barriers and ultimately to achieve gender equality at the corporate top.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article

Jagdish Bhadu, Dharmendra Singh and Jaiprakash Bhamu

The purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the lean implementation (LI) barriers in the context of labor intensive Indian ceramic industries through a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the lean implementation (LI) barriers in the context of labor intensive Indian ceramic industries through a statistically reliable and validated model.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, LI barriers are identified through a comprehensive review of relevant literature and discussions held with academicians/practitioners. Identified barriers, thereafter, are evaluated with Cronbach's alpha values using a statistical tool. The interpretive ranking process (IRP) methodology is applied for ranking of the barriers with reference to the measurable performance indicators.

Findings

The study identified highly relevant barriers of Indian ceramic industries. Further, these barriers were compared with performance measures through a cross-interaction matrix developed in the IRP model. The model highlights the analysis of dominance relationship of different barriers. Moreover, the result shows that top management commitment and leadership is at the top of the model, followed by lack of training opportunity and skills, and resistance to change and adopt innovations indicating their strongest driving power in LI.

Practical implications

This model may enable the firms to understand the LI barriers and come up with sensible implementation program. Further, the correlation results among the barriers will provide insights in mitigating the hurdles of lean manufacturing (LM) implementation in the industries.

Originality/value

This study empirically develops a model through the IRP for the barriers in LM implementation. From the reported literature, it appears that the application of IRP is very rare in ceramic industries in India. The analysis and prioritization of LI barriers may help practitioners to plan strategies to implement lean in a selected domain.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Bharat Singh Patel, Murali Sambasivan, R. Panimalar and R. Hari Krishna

The purpose of this study is to categorize and analyse the drivers and barriers of Lean Manufacturing (LM) and subsequently, based on the structural model develop a house…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to categorize and analyse the drivers and barriers of Lean Manufacturing (LM) and subsequently, based on the structural model develop a house of lean management which will give an idea to the academicians and practitioners about the factors that are critical to implement lean practices in an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of drivers and barriers was prepared based on the literature review and opinions from experts. Total Interpretive Structural Modelling (TISM) was utilized to build a structural hierarchy of the drivers and barriers of LM. The structural hierarchy was utilized to build the house of lean management.

Findings

Based on the hierarchy developed, the elements (drivers and barriers) of LM are classified into three groups: bottom-level, middle-level and top-level elements. To develop a house of lean management, bottom-level of elements were considered as a foundation, middle-level elements were considered as pillars and top-level elements were considered as a beam. Finally, foundation, pillars and beam of the house were used to support the roof (which is value to customers and profitability to firm).

Practical implications

The outcome of this research can assist researchers as well as practitioners to enhance the significant drivers and to reduce the impact of hazardous barriers for the better implementation of lean practices.

Originality/value

This research is a novel approach, as it visibly demonstrates both the drivers and barriers, examines the interrelationships among them in order and shows them pictorially as the house of lean management.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article

Shashank Kumar, Rakesh D. Raut, Vaibhav S. Narwane, Balkrishna E. Narkhede and Kamalakanta Muduli

In the digitalization era, supply chain processes and activities have changed entirely, and smart technology impacts each sustainable supply chain movement. The warehouse…

Abstract

Purpose

In the digitalization era, supply chain processes and activities have changed entirely, and smart technology impacts each sustainable supply chain movement. The warehouse and distribution of various organizations have started adopting smart technologies globally. However, the adoption of smart technologies in the Indian warehousing industry is minimal. The study aims to identify the implementation barriers of smart technology in the Indian warehouse to achieve sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an integrated Delphi-ISM-ANP research approach. The study uses the Delphi approach to finalize the barriers identified from the detailed literature review and expert opinion. The finalized 17 barriers are modeled using interpretive structural modeling (ISM) to get the contextual relationship. The ISM method's output and analysis using the analytical network process (ANP) illustrate priorities.

Findings

The study's findings showed that the lack of government support, lack of vision and mission and the lack of skilled manpower are the most significant barriers restricting the organization from implementing smart and sustainable supply chain practices in the warehouse.

Practical implications

This study would help the practitioners enable the sustainable warehousing system or convert the existing warehouse into a smart and sustainable warehouse by developing an appropriate strategy. This study would also help reduce the impact of different barriers that would strengthen the chance of technology adoption in the warehouses.

Originality/value

The literature related to adopting smart and sustainable practices in the warehouse is scarce. Modeling of adoption barrier for smart and sustainable warehouse using an integrated research approach is the uniqueness of this study that have added value in the existing scientific knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Arif Hartono and Abdur Rafik

This study aims to examine open innovation that consists a wide range of external knowledge search activities, such external search breadth and depth, external R&D…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine open innovation that consists a wide range of external knowledge search activities, such external search breadth and depth, external R&D, cooperation and acquisition activities, as a response to different innovation barriers faced by Indonesian firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are derived from Indonesia innovation survey. Exploratory factor analysis is used to identify and combine innovation barriers variables. Ordered logistic estimation is used to measure the impact of innovation barriers on firm openness decision. Logistic regression is used to measure the impact of innovation barriers on firm openness indicators such as external R&D, cooperation and acquisition as the variables are binary. Finally, Tobit regression is used to measure the impact of firm openness decision on innovation performance.

Findings

The main findings indicate that different barriers to innovation lead to different firms’ openness decisions, and different decisions on openness have differentiated influence on innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the innovation barrier literature by empirically testing whether experiencing barriers to innovation is associated with a broader external knowledge search activity. Previous studies tend to link innovation barriers with a narrow activity as indicated by external knowledge searching widely and deeply.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article

Timo Lorenz, Chelsea Rebecca Brüning, Mitzi Waltz and Marc Fabri

The purpose of this paper is to reveal barriers and their coherences between discrimination and self-perceived employability which students and employees on the autism…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal barriers and their coherences between discrimination and self-perceived employability which students and employees on the autism spectrum often face and need to overcome. These include discrimination based on disability, when applying for a job or retaining employment. This research located barriers in three different categories: formality – problems that focus on organizational structures in the application process; social – communication and interaction problems; and job demand barriers – obstacles that epitomize work-related strains.

Design/methodology/approach

Barriers and discrimination can prevent individuals from accessing the labor market which can lead to severe consequences for an individual on the autism spectrum, such as poverty, social deprivation or lack of health promotion and equal treatment. Self-perceived employability can be regarded as an additional strength, as it describes the perception of an individual’s own skills and versatility to acquire and keep a job. In total, 53 German-speaking individuals on the autism spectrum participated in an online survey.

Findings

Results showed statistically significant coherences between both, formality and social barriers with discrimination. Formality barriers also indicated statistically significant coherences with self-perceived employability. A mediation model with discrimination as mediator between each category of barriers and self-perceived employability was examined. The non-significant results suggest that discrimination does not work as a superior construct but as a sole influence next to barriers and self-perceived employability.

Originality/value

Individuals on the autism spectrum epitomize a less common research approach. Moreover, diversity policies and practices in the workplace often do not focus on including individuals on the autism spectrum even though the employment rates for this specific group of potential highly qualified employees were reported to be consistently lower when compared to any other group of disabled people. Findings suggest possible starting points for future research, which are discussed alongside practical strategies to overcome barriers and change discriminatory attitudes toward skilled individuals on the autism spectrum.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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Article

Chandra Prakash Garg and Vishal Kashav

The presence of barriers in the supply chain finance (SCF) of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) cripples the productivity and efficiency of SMEs and makes it challenging…

Abstract

Purpose

The presence of barriers in the supply chain finance (SCF) of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) cripples the productivity and efficiency of SMEs and makes it challenging to execute strategies. SCF barriers can be internal and external which tend to impede the desired performance and profitability of the SMEs. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discern the possible SCF barriers and analyze the criticality of the barriers to understand how they impact on the SMEs market of India.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a novel hybrid approach called best worst method (BWM) to evaluate the discerned barriers. BWM technique is espoused to appraise the SCF barriers, so that the decision-makers can rationally comprehend the reason behind dominance of one barrier over other. Although such an assessment may possibly vary for different industries, that is why proposed approach is generic in nature and can be applied in real-world cases. The robustness of the suggested model is also assessed through sensitivity analysis.

Findings

SCF barriers are identified through extensive literature review and inputs from the industry. The results derived through BWM approach concludes that the “Financial Barriers” are censorious and foremost inhibitors for SMEs to flourish, therefore, require special attention by the top management. Likewise, “Supply and Suppliers Barriers” are ranked second, conversely, “Market and Policy Related Barriers” are found least critical in nature in SMEs of India.

Research limitations/implications

This work is specific to SCF barriers and other barriers have not been touched upon. The study is based on expert panel opinion for seeking information which is restricted to Indian context, as the members of the expert panel belong to same geography.

Practical implications

This research could aid decision-makers and strategists to comprehend the deep-rooted initiatives to achieve a comprehensive implication of SCF across SC network. By assessing SCF barriers, this study helps SMEs to understand their shortfalls and in answering the pertinent question of how to gain excellence in this intensely competitive market.

Originality/value

SMEs are considered as engines of economic development worldwide. India too is striving for increasing the growth and development of SMEs in every aspect, to gain operational excellence, to make profits or employment generation but presence of SCF barriers makes it difficult to achieve this in Indian SMEs. Therefore, it is imperative to analyze the criticality of the SCF barriers to understand how they impact on SMEs market of India. The paper illustrates the modeling of SCF barriers among SMEs using BWM approach, exhibiting how comprehending barriers can improvise productivity and efficiency of the SCs in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Frank Ato Ghansah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Joshua Ayarkwa, David John Edwards and M. Reza Hosseini

While smart building technologies (SBTs) implementation ensures sustainability, their adoption is hampered by latent barriers, especially in project management processes…

Abstract

Purpose

While smart building technologies (SBTs) implementation ensures sustainability, their adoption is hampered by latent barriers, especially in project management processes. These latent barriers must be addressed to facilitate the successful and widespread adoption of SBTs. Therefore, this study aims to explore the significant latent barriers inhibiting the project management processes in adopting SBTs in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist research philosophy couched within a deductive approach was adopted to undertake a quantitative questionnaire survey of 227 project management and design team participants. Descriptive and inferential analytical tools (including a one sample T-test and exploratory factor analysis) were then adopted to interpret data collected.

Findings

The results reveal that the “high cost of smart sustainable materials and equipment” is the major significant barrier hindering the adoption of SBTs in developing countries. Latent barriers were: “structure and time-related barriers,” “construction-related barriers” and “human, policy and cost-related barriers”.

Originality/value

The study contributes novel insights into the prevailing nascent discourse on SBTs from the perspectives of construction project managers and design teams in developing countries, particularly. Furthermore, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that ascertains the significant barriers inhibiting project management processes in adopting SBTs in developing countries.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article

Eric S.W. Chan

The term “carbon footprint” emerged during the early 2000s, but many hotels remain unaware of what they should do to implement a comprehensive programme to reduce carbon…

Abstract

Purpose

The term “carbon footprint” emerged during the early 2000s, but many hotels remain unaware of what they should do to implement a comprehensive programme to reduce carbon footprint despite having some environmental measures. This study aims to investigate the barriers to reducing hotel carbon footprint and to explore why many hotel managers remain bystanders.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with hotel executives to understand what hinders hotels’ implementation of comprehensive programmes to reduce their carbon footprint. The NVivo 11 software package was used to organise data and code the transcribed interviews to identify patterns and themes.

Findings

The findings identified several main barriers. They were (1) a lack of understanding, (2) a lack of owner initiative, (3) difficulty with measurements, (4) a lack of stakeholder coordination and support, (5) a lack of a strong mediator, (6) balancing interests and (7) risky investment. The findings of this study suggest some specific strategies for overcoming these barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The study sample was restricted to the Hong Kong hotel executives interviewed; therefore, the findings will not reflect the full picture of managerial perceptions. Drawing on the foundations laid by this study, researchers could collect quantitative data from hotels in other countries to conduct a cross-cultural study.

Originality/value

Very few studies have investigated barriers to carbon-footprint reduction programmes. Specifically, none have been published in the hotel environmental management literature. This study represents a preliminary step towards understanding the barriers that prevent hotels from implementing the programmes.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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