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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Nirit Toshav-Eichner and Liad Bareket-Bojmel

This study sought to examine the attitudes of blue-collar workers toward job automation. The study examined the relations between job automation, fear of job loss and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the attitudes of blue-collar workers toward job automation. The study examined the relations between job automation, fear of job loss and self-actualization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative analysis) with 539 participants overall, we examined employees' attitudes toward job automation through two separate studies conducted in a large public organization that employs blue-, white- and pink-collar employees. The blue-collar workers who participated consisted of waste collectors, gardeners and parking supervisors whose work is at risk of job automation.

Findings

We found that 74% of the blue-collar employees described technology as a “replacer” that simplifies and reduces human work activities, while only 3% perceived it as an “enabler” that could enrich their jobs and expand human potential. Fifty-three percent of the employees in the white-collar professions described technology as a “replacer,” and 36% perceived it as an “enabler.” Among pink-collar workers, 51% perceived technology as an “enabler,” while only 14% perceived it as a “replacer.” A positive relationship between job automation and self-actualization was evident for pink- and white-collar workers, but not for blue-collar workers.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on how employees in different types of jobs perceive technological advancements at work. A classification of the perception of technology as an “enabler” vs a “replacer” is presented. The relationships between job automation and self-actualization in different job types are explored.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Sierdjan Koster and Claudia Brunori

Ongoing automation processes may render a fair share of the existing jobs redundant or change their nature. This begs the question to what extent employees affected invest…

Abstract

Purpose

Ongoing automation processes may render a fair share of the existing jobs redundant or change their nature. This begs the question to what extent employees affected invest in training in order to strengthen their labour market position in times of uncertainty. Given the different national labour market regimes and institutions, there may be an important geographical dimension to the opportunities to cope with the challenges set by automation. The purpose of this study is to address both issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the 2016 European labour Force Survey, the authors estimate with logit and multi-level regression analyses how the automation risk of a worker's job is associated with the propensity of following non-formal education/training. The authors allow this relationship to vary across European countries.

Findings

The results show that employees in jobs vulnerable to automation invest relatively little in training. Also, there are significant differences across Europe in both the provision of training in general and the effect of automation on training provision.

Originality/value

While there is quite a lot of research on the structural labour market effects of automation, relatively little is known about the actions that employees take to deal with the uncertainty they are faced with. This article aims to contribute to our understanding of such mechanisms underlying the structural macro-level labour-market dynamics.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Genevieve Darlow, James O.B. Rotimi and Wajiha Mohsin Shahzad

Automation facilitates production activities within offsite construction (OSC) projects through computer-controlled and mechanised systems that can be programmed to…

Abstract

Purpose

Automation facilitates production activities within offsite construction (OSC) projects through computer-controlled and mechanised systems that can be programmed to deliver various products in a self-regulating sequence. Despite known benefits of automation to offsite production, the level of automation adoption in New Zealand is low. This study is an effort to understand the current status of automation within the New Zealand construction industry and to identify the barriers and enablers to its uptake.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises the qualitative approach of semi-structured interviews (open-ended questions). Using a referral sampling strategy (snowballing), fifteen New Zealand industry experts were interviewed, and the data collected were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The study found that there is a weak business case for full automation. Four main categories of barriers to the uptake of automated OSC were identified, including requirement of high capital cost, lack of education about automation and OSC and non-existence of regulations to support OSC. It was noted that financial supports to the OSC sub-sector in form of subsidies, tax waivers, and enhanced leasing model could enhance the uptake of automation. Further to this more awareness about OSC's automation and regulations suitable for OSC could enhance the confidence of business owners to invest in this area.

Originality/value

Originality of this paper stems from the fact that, not much attention has been paid to investigating the uptake of automation for OSC sub-sector of construction industry in New Zealand context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Shakeel Ahmad Khan and Ghulam Ayesha

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key features of information management systems (IMSs) for automation in university libraries. This study also highlights…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key features of information management systems (IMSs) for automation in university libraries. This study also highlights the use of library information management systems in university libraries and the satisfaction of university librarians in using various IMS.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature. A survey research method has been applied to achieve the research objectives. Purposive sampling has been used to select the targeted population which consisted of 157 librarians working in university libraries. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to analyze the collected data by using SPSS software.

Findings

Free and open source software are widely used in university libraries to manage the bibliographic information of library material. KOHA is the most used software for library automation in university libraries of Pakistan. The key features of library information management system (IMS) include reliability and security of the software, user-friendly interface, advance searching options, use of library standards (MARC, Uni MARC, RDA), online upgradation, technical support of developing company, shared cataloging, multilingual features of software, etc (See Figure 4). The study recommends that the above-mentioned features must be considered by university librarians when selecting any software for library automation. Results showed that apart from the use of KOHA software, there are also some other software which are being used for library automation in university libraries of Pakistan. These systems include; Virtua, Library Management System (LMS), and Library Information Management Systems (LIMSs).

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for university librarians in Pakistan as well as in other countries. Librarians can use the results of this study as a blueprint before selecting any information management system to automate the library record.

Originality/value

This study identifies the core features of IMS for automation in libraries. These features have been recommended by informational professionals who have been working in automated libraries and possess adequate professional experience in using library automation software.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2006

Mary T. Dzindolet, Hall P. Beck and Linda G. Pierce

In complex environments, the use of technology to enhance the capability of people is commonplace. In rapidly changing and often unpredictable environments, it is not…

Abstract

In complex environments, the use of technology to enhance the capability of people is commonplace. In rapidly changing and often unpredictable environments, it is not enough that these human-automated “teams” perform well when events go as expected. Instead, the human operators and automated aids must be flexible, capable of responding to rare or unanticipated events. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the Framework of Automation Use (Dzindolet, Beck, Pierce, & Dawe, 2001) as it relates to adaptive automation. Specifically, our objectives are to: (1) examine a number of factors that determine how people can effectively integrate their activities with their machine partners in fluid environments and (2) consider the implications of these findings for future research.

Details

Understanding Adaptability: A Prerequisite for Effective Performance within Complex Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-371-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Anita Maček, Michael Murg and Živa Veingerl Čič

Robotic process automation (RPA) is a rapidly emerging field of computer science. It refers to the use of software robots or similar virtual assistants, which are…

Abstract

Robotic process automation (RPA) is a rapidly emerging field of computer science. It refers to the use of software robots or similar virtual assistants, which are programmed to complete repetitive and labor-intensive tasks. It has been shown that RPA offers technologically advanced solutions to businesses around the world and can cut costs, raise levels of efficiency, and improve quality. In the effort to remain competitive in the market, RPA has become a powerful and competitive tool for companies spanning a range of different industries. In this chapter, the authors’ focus is on the role of RPA in the banking sector. In this chapter author will analyze the existing scientific research in this area, with a focus on the process requirements for implementing RPA in banks, RPA vendors, and the general benefits of robotization in banking. The chapter will provide additional value through a list of suggestions for the practical use of RPA in the banking industry.

Details

Managing Customer Experiences in an Omnichannel World: Melody of Online and Offline Environments in the Customer Journey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-389-2

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Yuri Lima, Julia Celia Mercedes Strauch, Maria Gilda Pimentel Esteves, Jano Moreira de Souza, Miriam Barbuda Chaves and Daniel Takata Gomes

Brazil is struggling as the unemployment rate is 12.4% and nearly 13m people are unemployed. The fourth Industrial Revolution is advancing, and the country needs to…

Abstract

Purpose

Brazil is struggling as the unemployment rate is 12.4% and nearly 13m people are unemployed. The fourth Industrial Revolution is advancing, and the country needs to consider how it will impact the labor market. This work explores the impact of automation on the Brazilian workforce to supply decision-makers with information about the subject.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors converted the probability of computerization from the seminal work of Frey and Osborne to each of the more than 2,500 occupations in Brazil. They then crossed the automation probability with socioeconomic information about workers and companies available in the Brazilian Ministry of Labor Database.

Findings

In total, 60% of employment in Brazil is expected to be highly impacted by automation in the coming decades, with eight out of the ten occupations with the biggest workforce being highly automatable. Automation probability decreases as workers' education level increases, with the most significant difference between workers with higher education and those without it. The results show other inequalities in the impact of automation: the higher the wage, the lower the automation probability of occupations; the bigger the company, the lower the automation index; and workers from 16 to 24 years old have considerably higher chances of being automated.

Originality/value

This work is the first to study, in the context of the fourth Industrial Revolution, the impact of automation in Brazil with a socioeconomic analysis.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Eduardo Alejandro López Jiménez and Tania Ouariachi

Artificial intelligence (AI) and automation are currently changing human life with a great implication in the communication field. This research focusses on understanding…

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial intelligence (AI) and automation are currently changing human life with a great implication in the communication field. This research focusses on understanding the current and growing impact of AI and automation in the role of communication professionals to identify what skills and training are needed to face its impacts leading to a recommendation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involves methodological triangulation, analysing and comparing data gathered from consulting with experts using the Delphi method, focus group with communication students, and literature review.

Findings

Findings show that the likely impacts are on the one hand the enhancing of efficiency and productivity, as well as freeing communication professionals to focus on the creative side, strategy and analytical thinking, on the other hand, repetitive and low-level jobs could be lost, being higher position jobs or those involving creativity and decision making harder to automate. Two types of training are needed: to gather experience with the current AI and automated tools, and to focus on developing human qualities that AI cannot replicate.

Originality/value

The outcomes of this research are valuable to help current and future communication practitioners, as well as organisations, to be one step ahead and survive the age AI and automation, being aware of its current and near-future impacts. The paper offers a list of recommended soft and technical skills, as well as training needed, categorizing them in low, medium and high priority.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Tuomas Korhonen, Erno Selos, Teemu Laine and Petri Suomala

The purpose of this paper is to better understand management accounting automation by exploring the programmability of management accounting work.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand management accounting automation by exploring the programmability of management accounting work.

Design/methodology/approach

We build upon the literature on digitalization in management accounting and draw upon the pragmatic constructivist methodology to understand how digitalization takes place at the individual actors' level in accounting practice. The paper uses a data set from an interventionist case study of a machinery manufacturer.

Findings

We examine an actual process of automating management accounting tasks. During this development process, surprisingly, calculation tasks remained more fit for humans than machines though, initially, they were thought to be programmable.

Research limitations/implications

According to our findings, practitioners may interpret experts' nonprogrammable work tasks as programmable and seek to automate them. Only identifying the factual possibilities for automating accounting-related work can lead to automation-improved efficiency. Our findings can be increasingly relevant for advanced analytics initiatives and applications within management accounting (e.g. robotic process automation, big data, machine learning and artificial intelligence).

Practical implications

Practitioners need to carefully analyze the entity they wish to automate and understand the factual possibilities of using and maintaining the planned automatic system throughout its life cycle.

Originality/value

The paper shows that when processes are assessed from a distance, the nonprogrammable management accounting tasks and expertise can become misinterpreted as programmable, and the goal of automating them has little chance of success. It also shows possibilities for human accountants to remain relevant in comparison to machines and paves the way for further studies on advanced decision technologies in management accounting.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Chris Meyer, David Cohen and Sudhir Nair

The paper aims to fill this gap by positing a framework that considers the service automation decision as a matter of knowledge management: a choice between human resident…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to fill this gap by positing a framework that considers the service automation decision as a matter of knowledge management: a choice between human resident and codified knowledge assets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a conceptual paper, grounded in the knowledge-based view.

Findings

The paper uses the information processing theory, which argues that the level of uncertainty in a process should dictate the type of knowledge deployed, as the contingency for the automation choice, and customer interaction uncertainty as the driver of that contingency. From these ideas, propositions are generated relating customer interaction uncertainty and service automation. Further implications for artificial intelligence (AI) are also explored.

Originality/value

The framework illuminates and informs the strategic choices regarding service automation, including the use of AI in professional services, a timely and highly important topic. It offers a valuable model for practitioners and contributes to the academic literature by pointing the way for future directions for scholarly research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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