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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Robert Jensen

Four male undergraduates at Cornell University post on the internet the “Top 75 reasons why women (bitches) should not have freedom of speech.” Reason #20: “This is my…

Abstract

Four male undergraduates at Cornell University post on the internet the “Top 75 reasons why women (bitches) should not have freedom of speech.” Reason #20: “This is my dick. I'm gonna fuck you. No more stupid questions.”

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2017

Joanna Williams

Abstract

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Women vs Feminism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-475-0

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Susan Frelich Appleton and Susan Ekberg Stiritz

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their…

Abstract

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation of a transdisciplinary course, entitled “Regulating Sex: Historical and Cultural Encounters,” in which students mined literature for social critique, became immersed in the study of law and its limits, and developed increased sensitivity to power, its uses, and abuses. The paper demonstrates the value theoretically and pedagogically of third-wave feminisms, wild zones, and contact zones as analytic constructs and contends that including sex and sexualities in conversations transforms personal experience, education, society, and culture, including law.

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Special Issue: Feminist Legal Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-782-0

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Christina Ergas

Studying Cuban urban agriculture is important because empirically investigating existing, innovative projects geared toward sustainability can illuminate the processes…

Abstract

Purpose

Studying Cuban urban agriculture is important because empirically investigating existing, innovative projects geared toward sustainability can illuminate the processes that facilitate and inhibit environmental reform. I assess the social costs and benefits, achievements, and ongoing challenges at one urban farm. I highlight the interconnection of societal institutions – including gender relationships and gendered economic structures – that can foster or undermine sustainability projects. My analysis of the social dimensions of environmental problems is based on Ariel Salleh’s theoretical work. She argues that women’s invisible reproductive labor mediates paid labor by maintaining the viability of such labor. My contribution is to add an empirical dimension to her work.

Methodology

To assess the challenges of urban sustainability, I spent two months conducting participant observation and semi-structured interviews with workers at an urban farm in Havana, Cuba.

Findings

I find that culturally prescribed gender divisions of labor are entrenched in Cuban urban agriculture. Women continue to do most of the important, yet unacknowledged, domestic work that maintains the health of agricultural labor. Additionally, the heavier burdens women experience during the second shift restrict their ability to participate in local democratic decision-making processes, thereby limiting their capacity to modify oppressive cultural norms and maintaining the status quo.

Implications

Socially just environmental change does not automatically happen when the barriers of capitalism are removed, even if the society bases economic progress on increasing quality of life rather than profit. Instead, socially just environmental change must be a deliberate process that is constantly negotiated, reassessed, and prioritized.

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From Sustainable to Resilient Cities: Global Concerns and Urban Efforts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-058-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2016

Kimberly Kay Hoang

Drawing on ethnographic field research on female sex workers and male clients in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam’s global sex industry, this paper complicates our understanding…

Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic field research on female sex workers and male clients in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam’s global sex industry, this paper complicates our understanding of human trafficking in two ways. First, introducing the term perverse humanitarianism, the paper extends work on carceral feminism by offering concrete examples of interagency commitments between NGOs and the police. Second, my ethnography reveals that women framed their relationships with male clients as mutually beneficial because the men provided them with alternate pathways to economic mobility outside of sex work. Drawing on the same tropes of victimhood employed by the NGOs, sex workers elicited sympathy from male clients that they leveraged into gifts of money. Using men’s charitable gifts, many women became small entrepreneurs who opened local businesses and empowered other sex workers far beyond what NGOs were able to provide.

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Perverse Politics? Feminism, Anti-Imperialism, Multiplicity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-074-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Steven P. Schacht and Doris W. Ewing

Many academic men are sympathetic to issues of gender equity and supportive of feminist goals, but see feminism as basically irrelevant to their interests. Yet they may be…

Abstract

Many academic men are sympathetic to issues of gender equity and supportive of feminist goals, but see feminism as basically irrelevant to their interests. Yet they may be engaged in research, teaching, and/or community activities which advance feminist objectives, never examining their efforts in a feminist framework. Too often feminism has been defined as a “woman only” arena, or in competitive terms of male versus female privilege, rather than a cooperative effort to improve the quality of life for everyone. The few men who have attempted to embrace a feminist worldview as their own have been marginalized by women who view them with suspicion and by men who see them as gender traitors (or as a friend says, “The worm in the sperm”). Such a marginalized status promises a career which can be uncomfortable and insecure. We must expand the definition of feminism to include cooperative ventures of men and women working together to bring about positive social change.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Jacqueline Stephenson and Natalie Persadie

The purpose of this paper is to examine employment discrimination in the English-speaking Caribbean by analysing evidence from jurisdictions where anti-discrimination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine employment discrimination in the English-speaking Caribbean by analysing evidence from jurisdictions where anti-discrimination legislation has been enacted (namely Guyana, St Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago (T&T)).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews existing anti-discrimination legislation in the three named countries, along with available court and tribunal decisions, with a view of determining whether the protections reasonably cover all minority groups.

Findings

It has been shown that, despite the existence of anti-discrimination law in T&T, St Lucia and Guyana, discrimination is still reported. T&T is the only jurisdiction with a functioning Equality Opportunity Commission and Tribunal, and where a wide range of cases has been adjudicated, relative to St Lucia and Guyana.

Research limitations/implications

Legislators and policy makers may wish to consider the findings of this research in making legislative amendments or enacting new laws, with a view to broadening the range of protections. Organisational practitioners may use the findings to assist them with interpreting the law (and their responsibilities to protected groups) and its intended impact on HR practice and, where necessary, make changes where current practices are incongruent with the legislation.

Practical implications

Legislators and policy makers may consider the findings of this research in making legislative amendments, with a view to broadening the range of protections. Organisational practitioners may use the findings to assist them with interpreting and implementing the law.

Originality/value

This paper reviews current Caribbean anti-discrimination legislation and cases, which to date has not been done. It highlights the omission of sexual orientation from legislation enacted across the region. There is currently a paucity of research on employment discrimination within Caribbean territories and specifically as it relates to the effect of applicable legislation. Consequently, this paper establishes a benchmark for future researchers and it informs organisational and societal stakeholders as to what may constitute prohibited practices.

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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Abstract

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Running, Identity and Meaning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-367-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Ronald J. Burke, Mustafa Koyuncu and Lisa Fiksenbaum

Although qualified women are entering professional and managerial ranks within organizations, they continue to have difficulties in advancing their careers. It has been…

Abstract

Purpose

Although qualified women are entering professional and managerial ranks within organizations, they continue to have difficulties in advancing their careers. It has been suggested that the biggest obstacle to women's career advancement lies in the attitudes, biases and prejudices of their male colleagues and their organizational cultures. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of perceptions of organizational bias among managerial and professional women and their work satisfactions and levels of psychological well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 215 women, a 67 percent response rate, using anonymously completed questionnaires. Respondents worked for a large Turkish bank that had offices in several cities.

Findings

Women reporting greater perceptions of bias indicated less job satisfaction, lower levels of work engagement and higher levels of job stress; perceptions of bias were not related to intentions to quit however. In addition, women reporting greater perceptions of organizational bias indicated higher levels of exhaustion but these perceptions were unrelated to levels of self‐reported psychosomatic symptoms. Interestingly, more educated women reported higher levels of perceived organizational bias.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for women's job performance and career advancement as well as suggestions for addressing potential gender bias are offered.

Originality/value

The paper adds to knowledge about the work and career experiences of women in Turkey and the challenges they face.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Dawn L. Rothe and Victoria E. Collins

The inherent violence of the patriarchal spectacle is at times decried through mass social movements such as the #MeToo or black lives matter movements in response to…

Abstract

The inherent violence of the patriarchal spectacle is at times decried through mass social movements such as the #MeToo or black lives matter movements in response to overt political displays of power or policies reinforcing inequalities of gender, race and ethnicity. While critical criminologists and feminists have spent decades on topics such as these, what is, more often than not, ignored is the banal patriarchal oppression women across the globe endure during their everyday lives. Moreover, women, most notably in the Global North and the United States in particular, assent to their oppression through the willingness of allowing the innate violence of an unequal patriarchal system of harm and violence. Our specific focus is on the routinisation of everyday life women participate in reinforcing the status quo of the patriarchal carceral state. We also suggest that social change must be more than reactions and demands for processes of change within the social structure that maintain the overall patriarchal state and structure of society: rather resistance must equal revulsion and rejection for a revolutionary social change to the innate violent system.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4

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