Search results

1 – 10 of over 371000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2021

Oyindamola Abiola Ajayi and Tsietsi Mmutle

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) contributes towards a favourable corporate reputation. It explores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the communication of corporate social responsibility (CSR) contributes towards a favourable corporate reputation. It explores the communication strategies and channels organisations deemed reputable by stakeholders use to achieve an effective CSR communication.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this, a qualitative content analysis using the directed approach was conducted on the textual CSR communication materials of ten reputable organisations in South Africa based on the 2018 South Africa Reptrak survey.

Findings

Result showed that seven out of ten organisations use both self-serving and society-serving motive in their CSR communication, while the other 3 use only the society serving motive. The informing strategy was also more evident in the CSR communication materials than the interactive strategy. In terms of the communication channels, the study found that organisations mainly utilise controlled channels for CSR communication.

Originality/value

The literature reviewed and the findings of this study reveal a gap between the theory and practice of CSR communication. This drives the need for organisations to research and tailor CSR communication based on stakeholders' unique characteristics and preferences. The paper also contributes to improving the knowledge on the role different CSR communication strategies and channels play in CSR communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2021

Dinuka B. Herath and Davide Secchi

Abstract

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Xin Xiang

The purpose of this study is to examine whether and how internal capital markets mitigate financial constraints and enhance firms' willingness to engage in R&D projects.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether and how internal capital markets mitigate financial constraints and enhance firms' willingness to engage in R&D projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses panel data relating to 2,095 publicly traded firms in the Chinese A-share market for the period 2007–2019. The tobit regression method is applied to explore R&D investment–cash flow sensitivity of group affiliates, while the systematic generalised method of moments and dynamic ordinary least squares models are adopted to address the endogeneity problem in the robustness test.

Findings

This study finds that firms affiliated with business groups demonstrate lower R&D investment–cash flow sensitivity than non-affiliated firms do and that R&D investments are significantly influenced by the cash reserves of other group members. In terms of financing channels, this study demonstrates that group firms use internal cash and equity financing to support other members' R&D investments, while debt financing does not influence member firms' R&D investments. In addition, this study discovers that R&D spending harms the stock and operating performance of some group members.

Practical implications

The findings of this study enable business groups to focus on resource allocation and investment efficiency.

Originality/value

Although prior studies indicate that internal capital markets can enhance R&D spending, few studies reveal the mechanisms through which internal capital markets benefit R&D. This study uses a unique methodology to test the ability of the internal capital market to enhance R&D spending. In addition, group firms use internal cash flow and equity financing to support partners' R&D projects.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Ceren Ekebas-Turedi, Elika Kordrostami and Ilgım Dara Benoit

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of ad message framing (self-benefit vs other-benefit messages) and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) on green…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of ad message framing (self-benefit vs other-benefit messages) and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) on green advertising effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was borrowed from self-congruity theory and was tested with two between-subject design experiments; PCE was measured in the first study and manipulated in the second.

Findings

The findings show that both measured and primed PCE (low vs high) moderate the impact of a green ad’s message framing on consumer responses (i.e. attitude toward the brand and purchase intention). Specifically, an other-benefit message is more effective when consumers perceive that their individual actions can positively influence environmental issues (high PCE). In contrast, a self-benefit message is more effective when consumers perceive that their individual actions might not be enough to influence environmental issues (low PCE). This research also shows that the influence of message framing on consumer responses is mediated by the perceived social responsibility of the company.

Practical implications

This paper offers an outline for designing effective ad campaigns for green products. Managers can determine or manipulate the PCE level of their target market and frame the message in their ad campaign accordingly, which will positively drive perceived social responsibility and, in turn, the ad campaign’s effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to both the green advertising and self-congruity literature by showing the moderating effect of PCE on the effectiveness of message framing in green advertising.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Canh Minh Nguyen

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moral licensing effect of other in-group members' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) on focal employees' organizational deviance through moral self-concept. This paper also examines the moderating role of in-group identification in the mediated relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The multilevel path analysis and bootstrapping technique are employed to analyze the findings of a sample of 340 employees in 56 workgroups in Vietnam.

Findings

The results demonstrate that moral self-concept mediates the positive relationship between other in-group members' OCB and focal employees' organizational deviance. Furthermore, the findings indicate that in-group identification strengthens the indirect effect of other in-group members' OCB on focal employees' organizational deviance via moral self-concept.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should be aware of the potential negative consequences of OCB and the drawbacks of in-group identification in group contexts. In addition, practitioners should proactively prevent other in-group members' OCB from resulting in employees' organizational deviance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the moral licensing effect of OCB on organizational deviance through the moral self-concept mechanism and the moderating role of in-group identification in this mediated relationship.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Alejandro J. Estudillo

The other-race effect shows that people are better recognizing faces from their own-race compared to other-race faces. This effect can have dramatic consequences in…

Abstract

Purpose

The other-race effect shows that people are better recognizing faces from their own-race compared to other-race faces. This effect can have dramatic consequences in applied scenarios whereby face identification is paramount, such as eyewitness identification. This paper aims to investigate whether observers have insights into their ability to recognize other-race faces.

Design/methodology/approach

Chinese ethnic observers performed objective measures of own- and other-race face recognition – the Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese and the Cambridge Face Memory Test original; the PI20 – a 20-items self-reported measured of general face recognition abilities; and the ORE20 – a new developed 20-items self-reported measure of other-race face recognition.

Findings

Recognition of own-race faces was better compared to other-race faces. This effect was also evident at a phenomenological level, as observers reported to be worse recognizing other-race faces compared to own-race faces. Additionally, although a moderate correlation was found between own-race face recognition abilities and the PI20, individual differences in the recognition of other-race faces was only poorly associated with observers’ scores in the ORE20.

Research limitations/implications

These results suggest that observers’ insights to recognize faces are more consistent and reliable for own-race faces.

Practical implications

Self-reported measures of other-race recognition could produce misleading results. Thus, when evaluating eyewitness’ accuracy identifying other-race faces, objective measures should be used.

Originality/value

In contrast to own race recognition, people have very limited insights into their recognition abilities for other race faces.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Hanna Silvola and Eija Vinnari

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich extant understanding of the role of both agency and context in the uptake of sustainability assurance. To this end, the authors examine auditors' attempts to promote sustainability assurance and establish it as a practice requiring the professional involvement of auditors.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying institutional work (Lawrence and Suddaby, 2006) and institutional logics (Thornton, 2002; Thornton et al., 2012) as the method theories, the authors examine interview data and a variety of documentary evidence collected in Finland, a small society characterized by social and environmental values, beliefs in functioning institutions and public trust in companies behaving responsibly.

Findings

With this study, the authors make two main contributions to extant literature. First, the authors illustrate the limits that society-level logics related to corporate social responsibility, together with the undermining or rejected institutional work of other agents, place especially on the political and cultural work undertaken by auditors. Second, the study responds to Power's (2003) call for country-specific studies by exploring a rather unique context, Finland, where societal trust in companies is arguably stronger than in many other countries and this trust appears to affect how actors perceive the need for sustainability assurance.

Originality/value

This is one of the few accounting studies that combines institutional logics and institutional work to study the uptake of a management fashion, in this case sustainability assurance.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Priya Sharma, Qiyuan Li and Susan M. Land

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices around specific interests or affinities. The purpose of this study is to extend what is known about highly active/key actors in online affinity spaces, especially the ways in which they sustain and contribute to knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed 514 discussion posts gathered from an online affinity space on disease management. This study used a variety of methods to answer the research questions: the authors used discourse analyses to examine the conversations in the online affinity space, social network analyses to identify the structure of participation in the space and association rule mining and sentiment analysis to identify co-occurrence of discourse codes and sentiment of the discussions.

Findings

The results indicate that the quality and type of discourse varies considerably between key and other actors. Key actors’ discourse in the network serves to elaborate on and explain ideas and concepts, whereas other actors provide a more supportive role and engage primarily in storytelling.

Originality/value

This work extends what is known about informal mentoring and the role of key actors within affinity spaces by identifying specific discourse types and types of knowledge sharing that are characteristic of key actors. Also, this study provides an example of the use of a combination of rule mining association and sentiment analysis to characterize the nature of the affinity space.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Marcelo Leporati, Alfonso Jesús Torres Marin and Sergio Roses

The purpose of this paper is to study the case of Chile and identify the internal factors that lead to senior (+55 years old) entrepreneurship, either by necessity or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the case of Chile and identify the internal factors that lead to senior (+55 years old) entrepreneurship, either by necessity or opportunity, compared to that in other age groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on the adult population survey of the global entrepreneurship monitor between 2012 and 2016 and uses a logistic regression model that applies different variables to total early-stage entrepreneurial activity by necessity and opportunity.

Findings

Education, human and social capital development, gender and prior experience as an entrepreneur are internal factors that affect entrepreneurial activity with different weights and directions for people over 55 years old in Chile, either by necessity or opportunity. Further, certain factors exhibited by other age groups in the country explain entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not consider external perspectives on how context influences entrepreneurial intentions.

Practical implications

This paper represents a first step to understanding the factors that governments should consider when designing policies to support entrepreneurial activity in the senior demographic sector, considering differences in motivation by necessity or opportunity. In addition, this study contributes to the development of knowledge regarding senior entrepreneurship in Chile and to the identification of best practices that could be used in other regions.

Originality/value

This report is the first to focus on the motivations of senior entrepreneurs in Chile by quantifying the effects of different factors.

Details

European Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Individualism, Holism and the Central Dilemma of Sociological Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-038-7

1 – 10 of over 371000