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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2020

Anshu Sharma, Anju Kumari Dhiman and Surekha Attri

Internal fluffy portion along with fibrous strands of ripe pumpkin is considered as waste in processing industries though it contains sufficient amount of ß-carotene

Abstract

Purpose

Internal fluffy portion along with fibrous strands of ripe pumpkin is considered as waste in processing industries though it contains sufficient amount of ß-carotene pigment. The purpose of this paper is to use the leftover fluffy portion of ripe pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) after the use of its flesh for the purpose of processing.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were analyzed statistically by following a complete randomized design (CRD). All analysis were performed using the software OPSTAT.

Findings

One hour pre-enzymatic treatment before solvent extraction showed significant improvement in extraction yield in comparison to the isolation of ß-carotene pigment through solvent only. Temperature time combination was optimized as 40°C for 2 h during solvent extraction to obtain maximum yield irrespective of the type of extraction method used.

Practical implications

Extracted carotene pigment can further be used as a natural food colorant in processed food products not only to enhance the color appeal but also it improves the nutritional value of the product as ß-carotene acts as a precursor of vitamin A.

Social implications

Coloring agents of natural origin are becoming famous among society due to their health benefits. Consumers are becoming reluctant to use synthetic colors because of the undesirable allergic reactions caused by them, so carotene bio-pigment produced is a natural coloring compound with wide application in the food sector.

Originality/value

Even though few researchers have worked on the extraction of carotene pigment from pumpkin, but no researcher has reported the use of a waste fluffy portion of C. maxima for extraction of ß-carotene pigment.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Prashant Sahni, Poonam Aggarwal, Savita Sharma and Baljit Singh

The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the readers with the insights regarding the interventions of microalgal technology for production of metabolites and functional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the readers with the insights regarding the interventions of microalgal technology for production of metabolites and functional ingredients from microalgae for food and nutraceutical application and exploration of microalgae biomass for food application.

Design/methodology/approach

Various information databases such as journals, library catalogues and professional websites were used to collect information pertaining to application of microalgae in food and nutraceutical sector. Systematic review was made with recent studies covering the vital aspects of art of microalgae cultivation for metabolite production, functional ingredients from microalgae, market scenario and utilisation of microalgae biomass for the valorisation of the food products. Key points have been discussed after every section to highlight the practical implications to make this review more insightful for the readers.

Findings

Microalgal technology provides sustainable solution for its application in food and nutraceutical sector. The heart of metabolite production lies in the optimisation of cultivation conditions of microalgae. Wide array of functional components are obtained from microalgae. Microalgae offer an alternative source for omega-3 fatty acids. Microalgae is widely exploited for production of pigments, namely, ß-carotene, astaxanthin, lutein, phycocyanin and chlorophyll, that have important implication as natural colourants and nutraceuticals in food. Larger diversity of sterols found in microalgae confers bioactivity. Microalgae is finding its place in market shelves as nutraceuticals where its functional ingredients are in the form of powder, tablets, extract and beverages and in innovative products such as microalgae protein and fat, culinary algae oil and butter. Sprulina and Chlorella are popular choice for the supplementation of food products with microalgae biomass.

Originality/value

This is a comprehensive review that highlights the application of microalgal technology for the development of healthy food products and presents holistic intervention in food and nutraceutical sector.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Anshu Sharma, Anju Kumari Dhiman and Surekha Attri

This study aims to encapsulate the crude carotene pigment isolated from waste portion of Cucurbita maxima with the help of different encapsulating agents through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to encapsulate the crude carotene pigment isolated from waste portion of Cucurbita maxima with the help of different encapsulating agents through lyophilization to transform crude pigment into stable form for further utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper opted for encapsulation of extracted carotene pigment by lyophilization using various carrier materials such as maltodextrin 20 dextrose equivalent (DE), maltodextrin 10 DE and tapioca starch along with emulsifier polysorbate-80. After encapsulation of crude carotene pigment, prepared encapsulated powder was subjected to chemical analysis. The data was analysed statistically by a complete randomized design.

Findings

Maximum encapsulation efficiency, carotene content, antioxidant activity and water solubility index were achieved when 0.06% of crude carotene pigment was emulsified with same quantity of polysorbate-80, followed by encapsulation with 20% of maltodextrin 20 DE during lyophilization.

Originality/value

Even though few researchers have worked on the encapsulation of colour pigments, no researcher has reported encapsulation of carotene pigment extracted from waste of C. maxima.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Ankit Chokriwal, Bjorn John Stephen and Abhijeet Singh

Carotenoids are pigments that have significant value as colorants and antioxidants in pharmaceutical, food, textile and cosmetic industries. Owing to its high demand, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Carotenoids are pigments that have significant value as colorants and antioxidants in pharmaceutical, food, textile and cosmetic industries. Owing to its high demand, this study aims to identify ß-carotene producing bacteria from different terrestrial habitats of Jaipur region.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, standard isolation and purification process was used, followed by colony morphology and biochemical characterization of ß-carotene producing bacteria. ß-carotene concentration was determined quantitatively using spectrophotometric method.

Findings

Out of 43 isolates, 21 isolates showed peak range between 400 and 500 nm confirming the presence of carotenoids. Only one bacteria SAN-A has capacity to produce ß-carotene confirmed by the thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a yield of 1.68 mg/l. The 2, 2-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) assay showed an IC50 value of 4.0 mg/ml.

Originality/value

The present study revealed the presence of ß-carotene producing bacteria in the soil of different terrestrial habitat of Jaipur region which can be exploited as an economical source for ß-carotene production.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Mohd Aaqib Sheikh, Charanjiv Singh Saini and Harish Kumar Sharma

The study was aimed to explore the potential impact of microwave heating (450 W for 2, 4, 6 and 8 min) on antioxidant activity, anti-nutritional factors, volatile and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study was aimed to explore the potential impact of microwave heating (450 W for 2, 4, 6 and 8 min) on antioxidant activity, anti-nutritional factors, volatile and phenolic compounds of the plum kernels.

Design/methodology/approach

Plum kernels are rich in proteins, lipids and bioactive compounds that are mostly underused and undervalued.

Findings

The results showed that microwave heating at 450 W for 6 min significantly (p < 0.05) increased the antioxidant activity, total phenolic and flavonoid content, while the longer treatment time (450 W for 8 min) adversely affected the phenolic compounds. Most importantly, the anti-nutritional factors like amygdalin, hydrocyanic acid, phytic acid and tannin content were reduced up to 87.1, 84.7, 20.9 and 46.2%, respectively at 450 W for 6 min treatment conditions, which was confirmed from the larger shifts observed in FT-IR spectra near 1,157 cm−1. Microwave heating at 450 W for 6 min also proved beneficial in improving the bioavailability of volatile and phenolic compounds including chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, syringic acid, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ß-carotene, trans-ferulic acid, rutin trihydrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, tannic acid and quercetin by liberating them from the plant matrix.

Originality/value

The results thus indicate that controlled microwave heating could be an effective approach for the reduction of anti-nutritional factors besides leading to an overall improvement in antioxidant potential and volatile and phenolic compounds. This novel technological approach can proliferate the use of plum kernels in different diversified food formulations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Aaqib Nisar, Nusrat Jan, Amir Gull, Farooq Ahmad Masoodi, Tawheed Amin, Omar Bashir and Sajad Mohd Wani

The demand for functional foods has been increasing tremendously throughout the globe and keeping in view the health beneficial properties of apricot fruit. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for functional foods has been increasing tremendously throughout the globe and keeping in view the health beneficial properties of apricot fruit. The purpose of this study is to develop wheat flour based cookies enriched with apricot pulp powder in order to improve nutraceutical properties of cookies and dilution of gluten at the same time.

Design/methodology/approach

Cookies were prepared from wheat flour blended with apricot pulp powder at 0, 10, 15, 20 and 25% level and evaluated for proximate, functional, rheological, nutraceutical and sensory properties.

Findings

Fibre content of apricot powder-incorporated cookies (3.23%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher at 25% level than control (1.64%). The water absorption and oil absorption capacities decreased significantly (p < 0.05) upon increasing level of apricot pulp powder. The ß-carotene content, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content increased significantly (p < 0.05) upon incorporation of apricot pulp powder. The thickness of cookies increased, however, diameter and spread ratio decreased with increase in the levels of apricot pulp powder. Lightness (L*) value decreased, while redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) increased when incorporated with apricot pulp powder. Cookies having 25% apricot pulp powder showed maximum hardness and overall acceptability.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, the scientific literature on incorporation of apricot pulp powder in bakery products is scanty. As such the present research has a tremendous scope for the food industries to produce functional bakery products with antioxidant properties and diluted the gluten content at the same time.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tirhas M. Gebretsadikan, Geremew Bultosa, Sirawdink Fikreyesus Forsido and Tessema Astatkie

The purpose of this paper was to formulate porridge using orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP), soybean and moringa ingredients that optimizes its nutritional quality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to formulate porridge using orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP), soybean and moringa ingredients that optimizes its nutritional quality and acceptability.

Design/methodology/approach

A 16-run constrained D-optimal mixture design was used to evaluate proximate compositions and sensory acceptability of the products. Each composition and acceptability response variable was optimized separately, and then, the sweet spot that optimizes all was determined.

Findings

The protein, fiber, total ash, carbohydrate, iron and carotenoid contents as well as major sensory quality indicators were significantly affected by soybean, moringa and OFSP blends. However, the influence of the mixture on fat content was weak. Sensory acceptability was high for porridges processed from high OFSP and soybean, but higher nutritional quality was obtained from higher moringa levels. Graphical optimization showed that blends containing 68-75 per cent OFSP, 17-26 per cent soybean and 5-8 per cent moringa have produced nutrient enriched porridges with desirable sensory quality.

Originality/value

The study showed that OFSP, soybean and moringa have a potential for making protein, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, pro-vitamin A carotenoids and iron enriched product that will contribute to the fight against malnutrition in developing nations such as Ethiopia. In addition, having OFSP in the blend masks undesirable odor and taste imparted by moringa.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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