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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Richard A. Gray

In a previous issue of Serials Review, I described the three international organizations that I then assumed were the principal ones concerned with the protection of…

Abstract

In a previous issue of Serials Review, I described the three international organizations that I then assumed were the principal ones concerned with the protection of threatened tribal peoples throughout the world. I now know that I had overlooked one very important organization that is in fact coterminous with the organized effort to eradicate slavery. Until very recently, that organization was known as the Anti‐Slavery Society for the Protection of Human Rights. Gale's Encyclopedia of Associations: International Organizations places the foundation of this society in 1839, a date that is off by fifty‐one years, inasmuch as it can be shown that the society under at least two earlier names is continuous with the society that emerged, reorganized, redefined, and renamed in 1839 and with the society that remains vigorously active today.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Mark Wilberforce, Jane Hughes, Paul Clarkson, David Whyte, Helen Chester, Sue Davies and David Challis

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation and potential value of an electronic referral system to improve integrated discharge planning for hospitalised…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation and potential value of an electronic referral system to improve integrated discharge planning for hospitalised older adults with complex care needs. This new technology formed part of the “Common Assessment Framework for Adults” policy in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were undertaken as part of a case study approach within an acute hospital in the North West of England. First, qualitative interviews were undertaken with practitioners to explore early experiences using the new technology. Second, routinely collected administrative data were analysed, comparing referrals made using the new technology and those made through the usual paper-based process.

Findings

Qualitative interviews found that an electronic discharge system has, in principle, the potential to improve the efficiency and suitability of integrated care planning. However, the implementation proved fragile to decisions taken elsewhere in the local care system, meaning its scope was severely curtailed in practice. Several “socio-technical” issues were identified, including the loss of valuable face-to-face communication by replacing manual with electronic referrals.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of patients referred during the implementation phase meant that patient outcomes could not be definitively judged. Research into the longer-term implications and value of electronic referral systems is needed.

Originality/value

There is concern that attempts to integrate health and social care are stymied by incompatible systems for recording service user information. This research explores a novel attempt to share assessment information and improve support planning across health and social care boundaries.

Abstract

Purpose

Using risk-related data often require a significant amount of upfront work to collect, extract and transform data. In addition, the lack of a consistent data structure hinders the development of tools that can be used with more than one set of data. The purpose of this paper is to report on an effort to solve these problems through the development of extensible, internally consistent schemas for risk-related data.

Design/methodology/approach

The consortia coordinated their efforts so the hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas are compatible. Hazard data can be provided as either event footprints or stochastic catalogs. Exposure classes include buildings, infrastructure, agriculture, livestock, forestry and socio-economic data. The vulnerability component includes fragility and vulnerability functions and indicators for physical and social vulnerability. The schemas also provide the ability to define uncertainties and allow the scoring of vulnerability data for relevance and quality.

Findings

As a proof of concept, the schemas were populated with data for Tanzania and with exposure data for several other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The data schema and data exploration tool are open source and, if widely accepted, could become widely used by practitioners.

Practical implications

A single set of hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas will not fit all purposes. Tools will be needed to transform the data into other formats.

Originality/value

This paper describes extensible, internally consistent, multi-hazard, exposure and vulnerability schemas that can be used to store disaster risk-related data and a data exploration tool that promotes data discovery and use.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the…

Abstract

In order to succeed in an action under the Equal Pay Act 1970, should the woman and the man be employed by the same employer on like work at the same time or would the woman still be covered by the Act if she were employed on like work in succession to the man? This is the question which had to be solved in Macarthys Ltd v. Smith. Unfortunately it was not. Their Lordships interpreted the relevant section in different ways and since Article 119 of the Treaty of Rome was also subject to different interpretations, the case has been referred to the European Court of Justice.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Malcolm David James

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues raised by and the possible long-term significance of the judicial review obtained by the pressure group UK Uncut into HM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the issues raised by and the possible long-term significance of the judicial review obtained by the pressure group UK Uncut into HM Revenue and Customs’ decision to forgive £10 m of interest payable by the investment bank, Goldman Sachs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Lukes’ (2005) three dimensions of power as a conceptual framework, the paper compares this case with a similar case from the 1980s in order to discuss the importance of democratic oversight of the way in which public bodies discharge their duties, the extent to which this should override the principle of taxpayer confidentiality and the extent to which legal rules and procedures permit such oversight.

Findings

The comparison shows that, by permitting the review to proceed, greater weight was given to the importance of democratic oversight in the UK Uncut's case, but the rejection of both cases demonstrates that the tax authority is permitted very wide administrative discretion. However, whilst UK Uncut's challenge ultimately failed, it exposed aspects of the tax authority's relationship with large taxpayers to public gaze. This has contributed to demands for changes in the taxation system, which legislators might eventually feel forced to heed.

Originality/value

This paper reminds that any significant shift in public attitudes must always have a beginning, and that, even if the challenge fails, it might be the first tangible evidence of a demand for greater transparency in the administration of the tax system which might lead to future changes.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Sean Thomas

If a seller fails to deliver the correct quantity, the buyer may reject the goods in accordance with the Sale of Goods Act 1979, section 30(1). The nature of this right to…

Abstract

Purpose

If a seller fails to deliver the correct quantity, the buyer may reject the goods in accordance with the Sale of Goods Act 1979, section 30(1). The nature of this right to reject is unclear, and whether breach by short delivery will suffice to terminate the contract is also unclear. The purpose of this paper is to clarify this area of law.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus is on the combined case‐law and academic commentary on the topic of short delivery, and the broader issue of termination.

Findings

The paper suggests that breach by short delivery does terminate the contract. It suggests that the right to cure cannot provide an entirely satisfactory response for victims of short delivery. The paper also proposes a reform of the Sale of Goods Act 1979 to take this into account.

Research limitations/implications

This research mainly focused on the current legal position. Further research on the historical development of the rules on short delivery, which were crystallised in the Sale of Goods Act 1893, will provide valuable insights into this area of law.

Practical implications

The proposal for reform could have a practical benefit in terms of protecting buyers from the danger of short delivery, by providing them with a more secure remedy than what appears to be currently available.

Originality/value

To the extent of the author's knowledge, this is the first dedicated analysis of short delivery in the literature.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Gordon Burt

The Wikipedia (2008) entry for mathematical sociology cites four books with ‘mathematical sociology’ in the title: Coleman (1964), Fararo (1973), Leik and Meeker (1975)

Abstract

The Wikipedia (2008) entry for mathematical sociology cites four books with ‘mathematical sociology’ in the title: Coleman (1964), Fararo (1973), Leik and Meeker (1975) and Bonacich (2008). Fararo (1973, pp. 764–766) provides a guide to the literature in mathematical sociology covering journals, bibliographies, reviews and expository essays, readers, texts, original monographs and research papers. Many of the references are either broader than mathematical sociology, for example, concerning the behavioural sciences in general, or narrower, dealing with a particular topic within sociology, or concerning a related field such as social psychology. Three classical original monographs are identified: Dodd (1942), Zipf (1949) and Rashevsky (1951). Included in a second generation of monographs is Coleman's (1964)An Introduction to Mathematical Sociology’. Could it be that this is the first use of the phrase ‘mathematical sociology’?

Details

Conflict, Complexity and Mathematical Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-973-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Hans Tjio

Rules to preserve corporate assets are a necessary by‐product of limited liability, as well as a means of limiting agency costs arising from the separation of ownership…

Abstract

Rules to preserve corporate assets are a necessary by‐product of limited liability, as well as a means of limiting agency costs arising from the separation of ownership and control. Hence, it is axiomatic that the directors of a company are required to act bona fide in the best interests of the company; Re Smith & Fawcett. The weakness of the common law duty is that courts are reluctant to substitute the business judgments of the controllers with their own. According to Lord Wilberforce, in Howar d Smith v Ampol Petroleum:

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Steve Bruce

The Student Christian Movement (SCM) arose from the formal integration in one unit of a number of different strands of student‐run evangelical religion in British…

Abstract

The Student Christian Movement (SCM) arose from the formal integration in one unit of a number of different strands of student‐run evangelical religion in British Universities(1). The Jesus Lane Sunday School in Cambridge, staffed by students, had been open since 1827. David Livingstone's visit to Cambridge in 1858 inspired the Church Missionary Union and in the same period Cambridge students began a Daily Prayer Meeting. In 1877, the students brought their various efforts together into the Cambridge Inter‐Collegiate Christian Union (CICCU). Similar movements were developing in other colleges. The first major links were created by the “Cambridge Seven”. Even at the end of the period of the “Saints” (as Wilberforce and his fellow evangelicals were known), more than three‐quarters of the men who volunteered for foreign missions were artisans, shop‐boys, labourers and apprentices(2).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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