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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Bikram Jit Singh, Harsimran Singh Sodhi and Rippin

The growth and prosperity of a nation depends upon its ability to innovate technologically and engineering has erupted as a fundamental chauffer of this essence, since…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth and prosperity of a nation depends upon its ability to innovate technologically and engineering has erupted as a fundamental chauffer of this essence, since last couple of eras. But recent decline in engineering admissions triggers the downfall in skilled labor, which can cause recession in industries or can ultimately lead to economic crisis. This study tries to illustrate the present status of engineering-related education, particularly in India and tends to skim the various parameters that affect the enrollment of students among higher education institutes, directly or indirectly.

Design/methodology/approach

A unique approach had been unleashed to tackle the nuisance of low admission among Indian engineering colleges or universities. Factors reviewed from the literature were further prioritized quantitatively after distributing suitable questionnaires among a relevant set of engineering aspirants. The “survey form” used was tactically designed on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM), which analyzed the data captured in Minitab statistical software and deducted logical inferences to optimize the “critical-to-admission” (CTA) factors, applicably.

Findings

A case study was successfully executed in a North Indian state to prove the efficacy of proposed methodology as far as downtrend in admission was concerned. This study was a rare blend of questionnaire-based work, where design of experiments principles had been utilized exclusively. It provided significant findings on how to earmark different admission-decisive factors along with their required prioritization.

Practical implications

It can further help the universities and higher education institutes to draft their indispensable professional policies and vision–mission statements, appropriately.

Originality/value

Quantitative studies in the service sector (like higher education) are quite rare to see. The present work is not only providing a roadmap for engineering institutions to boost their admissions in upcoming challenging times but it also acts as a light house for new students as it provides necessary guidelines for shortlisting colleges or universities while seeking admission for higher studies.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2018

Miri Endeweld and Jacques Silber

Using data on food insecurity in Israel, this chapter suggests borrowing techniques from the literature on multidimensional poverty to measure food insecurity, a…

Abstract

Using data on food insecurity in Israel, this chapter suggests borrowing techniques from the literature on multidimensional poverty to measure food insecurity, a distinction being made between “nominal” and “real” food insecurity. Various counting techniques are then implemented, including the well-known approach of Alkire and Foster. The chapter ends with a section where, following recent work by Dhongde, Li, Pattanaik, and Xu (2016), a distinction is also made between “basic” and “non-basic” dimensions of food insecurity.

Details

Inequality, Taxation and Intergenerational Transmission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-458-9

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Rosemary C. Reilly

This chapter details the instructional experiences of a group of graduate students, who are emerging Human Systems Intervention practitioners – men and women who…

Abstract

This chapter details the instructional experiences of a group of graduate students, who are emerging Human Systems Intervention practitioners – men and women who self-identify as white and work in organizational, community, and educational leadership settings. I outline a series of learning experiences that supported a group of MA students to uncover white supremacist thinking in their work – their approaches to intervention and their mental models regarding effective organizational or community functioning. Using contemplative practices to dig out oppressive, invisible dimensions of white identity, we examined how our whiteness shaped and warped how we enacted our work in community and organization development. We did this by reflective reading, meditation, contemplative arts, deep listening and storytelling, singing and music, and ceremony. This chapter illustrates how higher education can address a fundamental mental model and world view that influences how social responsibility is envisioned and how issues of social justice can be advanced within graduate professional education through socially responsible teaching and learning strategies and activities.

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Ann Rippin

The purpose of this paper is to explore corporate buildings as discursive entities. They are machines designed to tell the corporate story; they embody the aspirations of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore corporate buildings as discursive entities. They are machines designed to tell the corporate story; they embody the aspirations of a culture. This is particularly the case with headquarters buildings, which are rhetorical artefacts proclaiming a narrative of identity, designed to legitimise past, present and future decisions and strategies. Buildings such as the Vatican, Windsor Castle, the Houses of Parliament and the old Prudential Insurance Building proclaim that the organisation is old and venerable, trustworthy, a model of probity, stable, and here to stay.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach employed in this paper uses literature as a way of representing organisations. This paper works with an archaic genre to present a traveller's tale. This has been used to attempt to open up a third space between literary techniques used to analyse organisations and literature as a management education strategy. By opening up this possibility of a third position, it is hoped that readers will be encouraged to make their own interpretations.

Findings

The paper posits that organisations attempt to affirm their “brand” consciously, or unconsciously, through their public buildings. They tell their “stories” materially. However, despite their best efforts at image control, counter‐narratives leach out from these structures as their use of space is experienced by human subjects.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to open up a third space for readers to co‐create meaning with the author and for themselves. There is a clear political purpose here: to expose the oppressive practices of organisations which legitimate their existence in part at least through their corporate buildings, but the paper also signals the aesthetic delight, the pleasure that we can take in allowing ourselves to be enchanted by these buildings.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

George Cairns and Joanne Roberts

Abstract

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Ann Rippin

This paper seeks to use two empirical episodes to investigate gendered critiques of leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to use two empirical episodes to investigate gendered critiques of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an action inquiry approach by reflecting on two pieces of work, one collaborative and one individual, to reflect on ideas about women's ways of leading, and women's leadership of groups. The work includes the making of artefacts which it uses as a stimulus for reflection and as a reflective practice in itself. The artefacts which it uses are quilts, and the feminised nature of quiltmaking is also considered.

Findings

The paper begins by reflecting on the ability of a leaderless group of women to achieve a task in a highly successful and timely manner. It uses this experience to explore theories of distributed leadership in work groups, and suggests an alternative proxy for leadership. It then uses the creation of a piece of art about Elvis Presley and the Madonna to consider gendered constructions of leadership, including heroic and post‐heroic leadership. Drawing on the work of Fletcher, it considers why feminised post‐heroic leadership is so often vaunted and so seldom seen. It posits the tension between self‐abnegation and self‐promotion and service and individual achievement as an explanation of the slow adoption of this more feminised form of leadership. The paper traces the emergent process of the work itself, and hints at the difficulty of getting the “right answers” from research participants, and reflects on the role of nostalgia as a limiting factor in organisational research.

Originality/value

The collaborative method of the piece synchronises with the ideas under investigation, and builds on the critique of post‐heroic leadership as an observable phenomenon in organisations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Chris Land and Martyna Śliwa

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the relationship between novels and organizational change and to introduce this special issue of the Journal of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the relationship between novels and organizational change and to introduce this special issue of the Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Design/methodology/approach

The themes of the special issue are discussed and each paper is introduced.

Findings

The relationship between novels and organizational change is a complex, iterative one that should be understood in its historical, political, economic and cultural context. If so understood, novels can enhance our understanding of organizational processes.

Originality/value

Although literature and representation in general have been discussed in studies of organization and management before, the specific literary form of the novel has not been theorised in relation to the question of novelty and organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2014

Gazi Islam

The purpose of this paper is to examine the monstrous in organizational diversity by introducing the concept of cultural anthropophagy to the diversity literature. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the monstrous in organizational diversity by introducing the concept of cultural anthropophagy to the diversity literature. Using Kristeva's notion of abjection to better understand cultural anthropophagy, the paper argues that cultural anthropophages cross boundaries, and build identity through desire for and aggression toward valued others.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a conceptual discussion of abjection, along with a historical survey of anthropophagic approaches from Brazilian art and cultural studies.

Findings

Anthropophagic approaches highlight unique features of organizational identity, framing identity formation as a fluid process of expulsion and re-integration of the other. While abjection approaches focus on the exclusion of material aspects of the self and the formation of self-other boundaries, anthropophagy focusses on the re-integration of the other into the self, in a symbolic gesture of re-integration, desire, and reverence for the other.

Originality/value

The idea of anthropophagy is a recent entrant into the organizational literature, and the close relation between anthropophagy and abjection is illuminated in the current paper. Original insights regarding the search for positive identity, the ambivalence of self and other, and the relation of the particular and the universal, are offered with regards to the diversity literature.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Ann Rippin

The purpose of this paper is to re‐examine a celebrity CEO account using a variety of literary forms to uncover discourses of colonisation. Focuses on the probanza de

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re‐examine a celebrity CEO account using a variety of literary forms to uncover discourses of colonisation. Focuses on the probanza de mérito and the wonder tale or traveller's tale. Ideas of Non‐Place (Augé) and spatial practices (Lefebvre) conclude the analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

A close reading of the account of the building of the Starbucks retail empire, given in the CEO account: Pour Your Heart into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time against the text, gives insights into the strategy and internal logic of the company founder which might otherwise be missed.

Findings

The account reveals the nature of the published account of the growth of the company as analogous to many of the accounts of the colonisation of the new world. The analysis of spatial practices at the company is used to explain some of the most successful resistance to its expansion.

Originality/value

Uses a wide range of theory to unpack celebrity success narrative and reveal counter‐narrative of practice.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Jennifer Anne de Vries and Marieke van den Brink

Translating the well-established theory of the gendered organization into strategic interventions that build more gender equitable organizations has proven to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Translating the well-established theory of the gendered organization into strategic interventions that build more gender equitable organizations has proven to be difficult. The authors introduce the emergence of the “bifocal approach” and its subsequent development and examine the potential of the “bifocal approach” as a feminist intervention strategy and an alternative means of countering gender inequalities in organizations. While pre-existing transformative interventions focus on more immediately apparent structural change, the focus begins with the development of individuals. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Developed through iterative cycling between theory and practice, the “bifocal approach” links the existing focus on women’s development with a focus on transformative organizational change. The bifocal approach deliberately begins with the organization’s current way of understanding gender in order to build towards frame-breaking transformative change.

Findings

The authors show how the bifocal is able to overcome some of the main difficulties of earlier transformative approaches, maintaining organizational access, partnership building, sustaining a gender focus and ultimately sustaining the change effort itself. The bifocal approach seeks structural change, however, the change effort rests with individuals. The development of individuals, as conceived within the bifocal approach was designed to create a “small wins” ripple effect, linking individual (agency) and organizational change (structure).

Practical implications

The bifocal approach offers a comprehensive re-modelling of traditional interventions for other scholars and practitioners to build on. Organizational interventions previously categorized as “fixing women” could be re-examined for their capacity to provide the foundation for transformative change.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper lies in proposing and examining the bifocal approach as a feminist intervention strategy that overcomes the dualism between the existing frames of organizations and the transformative frame of scholars, in order to move practice and theory forward.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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