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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Sherman Folland

Norman Daniels has presented a concept of health care need which heproposes as the basis for the distribution of health care resources,plausibly to define and provide a…

Abstract

Norman Daniels has presented a concept of health care need which he proposes as the basis for the distribution of health care resources, plausibly to define and provide a philosophical justification for a decent minimum of health care. Daniels′ construction is reconsidered and criticisms both from the literature and those new to this discussion are investigated.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2023

Chad S. Seifried, Milorad M. Novicevic and Stephen Poor

This study aims to use a theoretical-based case study of two distinct ownership groups of the Jack Daniel’s brand to explore how rhetorical history (i.e. malleability of the past…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use a theoretical-based case study of two distinct ownership groups of the Jack Daniel’s brand to explore how rhetorical history (i.e. malleability of the past for strategic goals) may evoke and capitalize on different forms of nostalgia. Within, the authors configure four forms of nostalgia (i.e. personal, historical, collective and cultural) from the individual or collective interaction and level of direct experience one has with the past as lived or happened.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an historical research approach which involved the identification of primary and secondary sources, facility tour, source criticism and triangulation to create themes of rhetorical history infused with nostalgic narratives using compelling evidence through rich description of this fusion.

Findings

The findings reveal how nostalgia-driven narratives reflecting different collective longing for the re-creation of an American Paradise Lost used by Jack Daniel (i.e. the man) and later but differently by Brown-Forman. This study uncovers how the company’s inherited past was used rhetorically throughout its history, beginning with the nostalgic story of Jack Daniel and the distillery’s nostalgically choreographed location in Lynchburg, Tennessee. This study delves into this setting to highlight the importance of symbols, details, emotional appeals and communications for collective memory and identity development and to showcase the ways in which they are influenced by different types and forms of nostalgia.

Originality/value

This study adds to a limited number of studies focused on understanding the impact of founders on an organization’s brand and how that is malleable. This study responds to scholarly calls to study the influence of sequenced historical rhetoric on an organization and highlight the relevance of social emotions such as nostalgia for rhetorical history. Finally, the theoretical contribution involves the advancing and construction of a theory typology of nostalgia previously proposed by Havlena and Holak in 1996.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Philip Gharghori, Howard Chan and Robert Faff

Daniel and Titman (1997) contend that the Fama‐French three‐factor model’s ability to explain cross‐sectional variation in expected returns is a result of characteristics that…

Abstract

Daniel and Titman (1997) contend that the Fama‐French three‐factor model’s ability to explain cross‐sectional variation in expected returns is a result of characteristics that firms have in common rather than any risk‐based explanation. The primary aim of the current paper is to provide out‐of‐sample tests of the characteristics versus risk factor argument. The main focus of our tests is to examine the intercept terms in Fama‐French regressions, wherein test portfolios are formed by a three‐way sorting procedure on book‐to‐market, size and factor loadings. Our main test focuses on ‘characteristic‐balanced’ portfolio returns of high minus low factor loading portfolios, for different size and book‐to‐market groups. The Fama‐French model predicts that these regression intercepts should be zero while the characteristics model predicts that they should be negative. Generally, despite the short sample period employed, our findings support a risk‐factor interpretation as opposed to a characteristics interpretation. This is particularly so for the HML loading‐based test portfolios. More specifically, we find that: the majority of test portfolios tend to reveal higher returns for higher loadings (while controlling for book‐to‐market and size characteristics); the majority of the Fama‐French regression intercepts are statistically insignificant; for the characteristic‐balanced portfolios, very few of the Fama‐French regression intercepts are significant.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1971

J. Cusack

March 12, 1971 Compressed air work — Breach of statutory duty — Negligence — Caisson disease in form of bone necrosis — Causation — Faulty decompression procedure and equipment …

Abstract

March 12, 1971 Compressed air work — Breach of statutory duty — Negligence — Caisson disease in form of bone necrosis — Causation — Faulty decompression procedure and equipment — Whether risk reasonably foreseeable by employers — The Work in Compressed Air Special Regulations, 1958 (SJ. 1958,No. 61),regs. 4(1), 6,8(1), 8(2) (a), 10(1) and 10(3).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Ramzi Lajili, Olivier Bareille, Mohamed Lamjed Bouazizi, Mohamed Ichchou and Noureddine Bouhaddi

This paper aims to propose numerical-based and experiment-based identification processes, accounting for uncertainties to identify structural parameters, in a wave propagation…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose numerical-based and experiment-based identification processes, accounting for uncertainties to identify structural parameters, in a wave propagation framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A variant of the inhomogeneous wave correlation (IWC) method is proposed. It consists on identifying the propagation parameters, such as the wavenumber and the wave attenuation, from the frequency response functions. The latters can be computed numerically or experimentally. The identification process is thus called numerical-based or experiment-based, respectively. The proposed variant of the IWC method is then combined with the Latin hypercube sampling method for uncertainty propagation. Stochastic processes are consequently proposed allowing more realistic identification.

Findings

The proposed variant of the IWC method permits to identify accurately the propagation parameters of isotropic and composite beams, whatever the type of the identification process in which it is included: numerical-based or experiment-based. Its efficiency is proved with respect to an analytical model and the Mc Daniel method, considered as reference. The application of the stochastic identification processes shows good agreement between simulation and experiment-based results and that all identified parameters are affected by uncertainties, except damping.

Originality/value

The proposed variant of the IWC method is an accurate alternative for structural identification on wide frequency ranges. Numerical-based identification process can reduce experiments’ cost without significant loss of accuracy. Statistical investigations of the randomness of identified parameters illustrate the robustness of identification against uncertainties.

Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Niall O’Kane, Ian Hall and Mo Eyeoyibo

The purpose of this paper is to review a case of a man with a mild learning disability and autistic spectrum disorder who successfully appealed against a Deprivation of Liberty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review a case of a man with a mild learning disability and autistic spectrum disorder who successfully appealed against a Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards authorisation under English law.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors wanted to identify the factors contributing to the individual’s deprivation of liberty and subsequent successful appeal. The authors examined the accounts from the experts involved on each side of the case including different views on the person’s capacity to make certain decisions. The authors examined several of the individual’s psychological and psychiatric assessments. The authors interviewed the individual on two occasions: once during the appeals process, and following his successful appeal.

Findings

The authors identified several reasons as to why the individual was successful in appealing against the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. First, the individual was able to seek legal support to appeal independently. Second, experts involved on each side of the case had differing opinions regarding capacity to make certain decisions. Third, the indication for the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards was subsequently declared not valid. Finally, the authors found that the quality of life and psychological well-being for the individual improved following removal of restrictions.

Practical implications

The authors highlight the wider issues relating to an individuals’ rights to challenge authorisations in the Court of Protection as well as to future considerations and directions of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards legislation in light of evolving case law.

Social implications

The authors highlight the importance of empowering patients in matters relating to their care and treatment, as well as protecting their human rights, dignity and autonomy.

Originality/value

The authors examine the barriers to challenging Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards authorisation and the ever-evolving Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards process.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Maryanne Theobald, Amanda Bateman, Gillian Busch, Megan Laraghy and Susan Danby

This chapter investigates children’s play and social interactions in a multilingual preschool context where the lingua franca (common language) is English. This investigation…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter investigates children’s play and social interactions in a multilingual preschool context where the lingua franca (common language) is English. This investigation follows the experiences of one child for whom English is a second language (L2). The analytic focus explores how the child gains access and participation in play activities in relation to the peer culture of the group.

Methodology/approach

Drawing on ethnomethodology and conversation analysis approaches, this chapter offers turn-by-turn analysis to show how the children’s interactions unfold and identifies children’s interactional approaches as they enter play and make friends. Particular attention is focused on how one of the children manages his attempts at entry into the peer group’s games using the building blocks.

Findings

The close detailed analysis of one extended episode highlighted the co-produced nature of interaction. The findings identify a repertoire of four resources used by one of the L2 children within the peer group, to access play activities in the building space: (1) linguistic resources of requests, such as “Can I play?” “Are you building?”; (2) “tailing” others closely; (3) references to the moral obligations of being a best friend; and (4) using objects as resources for entry. While the analytic focus is on one child’s strategies, analysis considers this child’s individual actions in relation to his peers. What is made apparent is that children’s uptake and participation in peer interaction is dependent on the social agenda and the local aspects of peer culture, not solely on children's language proficiency.

Originality/value

Attention to how children employ strategies to play and understanding the local conditions of peer culture can assist educators to support children’s attempts for participation and friendship in multilingual early years settings.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2019

James D. White

While working on the final draft of Das Kapital Volume I, Marx discovered that the assumption that he had previously held: as it circulated capital extended its sphere of…

Abstract

While working on the final draft of Das Kapital Volume I, Marx discovered that the assumption that he had previously held: as it circulated capital extended its sphere of operation and at the same time absorbed earlier forms of economic organization was not supported by empirical evidence. From 1869 he began to study how in fact capital began to circulate in Russia, a country which had begun to create a capitalist economy after the liberation of the peasantry in 1861. Marx was aided in this project by Nikolai Danielson, who sent him materials on the Russian economy and who himself made a study of contemporary trends in Russian economic development. Marx contributed to the article Danielson published in 1880 on this subject. One of the works Marx acquired was the book by Vorontsov, who concurred with Danielson that only some features of capitalism were present in the Russian economy and that peasants were dispossessed without being re-deployed in capitalist enterprises. Marx died without incorporating his Russian material into the second volume of Das Kapital. Engels failed to see any problem with the circulation of capital and published the manuscripts as he found them, dispersing Marx’s Russian materials. Unlike Danielson, Engels was convinced that Russia’s economic development did not differ in any way from that of Western Europe, a conviction shared by Plekhanov and Lenin, who classed Danielson and Vorontsov as “narodniki.” Lenin’s book The Development of Capitalism in Russia is a polemic against Danielson and Vorontsov, but does not directly address the points they made.

Details

Class History and Class Practices in the Periphery of Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-592-5

Keywords

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