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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Adam Hill, Anna Tickle and Danielle De Boos

Extant literature exploring service user (SU) involvement in clinical psychology training has been limited by its sampling from singular training programmes and its…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature exploring service user (SU) involvement in clinical psychology training has been limited by its sampling from singular training programmes and its restricted application of psychological theory. This research seeks to counter limitations by exploring SUs’ experiences across multiple clinical psychology training programmes in the UK and by deductively applying psychological theory relating to power, recovery, identity and group development.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 participants. A deductive thematic analysis was used to analyse qualitative data.

Findings

Five main themes were identified: environment determines sense of safety; meeting challenges; sense of purpose, worth and value; the person you see now is not the person I was; and wanting to break the glass ceiling.

Research limitations/implications

Carers are underrepresented and the sample does not contain SUs who were no longer involved in training.

Practical implications

It is important that the environment fosters psychological safety for SUs, via positive and supportive relationships with trainees and staff, with SUs being treated as equals and financially reimbursed as such. SUs and professionals need to explore managing and sharing power to enable SUs to feel valued and to reap benefits from involvement, including developing a positive sense of identity.

Originality/value

The research is part of the early literature exploring SUs’ experiences of involvement in clinical psychology training and is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first to explore the personal effects of involvement across multiple programmes.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Alex Lord, Anna Tickle and Anna Buckell

This study aims to understand how staff in homelessness services conceptualise readiness for change in the individuals they support and how this informs their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how staff in homelessness services conceptualise readiness for change in the individuals they support and how this informs their decision-making in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative design was used. Ten staff members participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were examined through inductive–deductive thematic analysis, using a social constructivist epistemological lens.

Findings

Five main themes were constructed: “multiple complex needs mean multiple complex changes”, “talk versus behaviour”, “change is not a linear trajectory”, “the role of consistent boundaried relationships” and “change is not solely within the individual’s control”.

Practical implications

This research challenges existing notions of “readiness for change” as located within individuals and a prerequisite for using support from services. It has implications for staff and services, particularly those which are time-limited and address only single problems; service users may not be ready for some changes, but it should not be assumed they are not ready for change in other areas of their life. The offer of supportive relationships may precede and contribute to readiness for positive changes. Support should be offered based not only an individual’s intra-psychic readiness for change but also how the system might actively work to promote hope that change can be achieved and maintained.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore staff members’ conceptualisations of readiness to change in relation to individuals with multiple complex needs and how this might influence practice.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Rupert Burge, Anna Tickle and Nima Moghaddam

Implementing trauma informed care (TIC) for individuals facing homelessness and multiple disadvantage is proposed to help both service users and staff work effectively and…

Abstract

Purpose

Implementing trauma informed care (TIC) for individuals facing homelessness and multiple disadvantage is proposed to help both service users and staff work effectively and therapeutically together. However, the effectiveness of implementing TIC via training is debatable. This study aims to explore the effects of a four-day TIC and psychologically informed environments training package in such services.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis explores the effect of this training on the degree of TIC as measured by the TICOMETER, a psychometrically robust organisational measure of TIC. The study examines group and individual level changes from before training and again at six-month and one-year follow-up time-points.

Findings

At the group level analysis, three of the five TICOMETER domains (knowledge and skills, relationships, and policies and procedures) were higher when compared to pre-training scores. The remaining two domains (service delivery and respect) did not improve. Individual-level analysis showed some participants’ scores decreased following training. Overall, the training appeared to modestly improve the degree of TIC as measured by the TICOMETER and these effects were sustained at one-year follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited by the design and low response rates at follow-up.

Practical implications

Training is necessary but not sufficient for the implementation of TIC and needs to be complemented with wider organisational and system-level changes.

Originality/value

This paper is the first UK study to use the TICOMETER.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

H. Alistair Bailie, Anna Tickle and Michael Rennoldson

Peer support (PS) workers are being employed despite uncertain evidence for clinical and cost-effectiveness. Psychological theories have been proposed to explain the…

Abstract

Purpose

Peer support (PS) workers are being employed despite uncertain evidence for clinical and cost-effectiveness. Psychological theories have been proposed to explain the mechanisms of PS but these lack empirical validation and specificity to professional PS. The purpose of this paper is to develop a substantive interpretive grounded theory of service-users’ experience of professional PS work.

Design/methodology/approach

Constructivist grounded theory was used throughout. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten service-users who had engaged with a professional PS worker.

Findings

Three overarching themes were constructed. “The process of disclosure” describes how disclosure of mental health difficulties, experiences as a service-user and wider disclosure about life experiences, interests and values facilitate the development of a shared identity with the PS worker. “The product of disclosure” highlights the sense of being understood as a result of the disclosure and marks a deepening of the relationship. “Dual roles” describes the tenuous position of holding both a professional relationship and friendship.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should seek to refine the theory developed and compare the effects of therapist self-disclosure with that found within PS. There were limitations within the study, including limited diversity within the sample as well as difficulties with recruitment.

Originality/value

This study connects service-users’ accounts of receiving PS with existing psychological theory to move towards an understanding of the relationship between receivers and providers of professional PS.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Amy Mellow, Anna Tickle and Michael Rennoldson

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic search of the peer-reviewed qualitative literature investigating the lived experience of seclusion for adults with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic search of the peer-reviewed qualitative literature investigating the lived experience of seclusion for adults with mental health difficulties, to appraise the quality of the existing literature and synthesise findings. Background: seclusion is a controversial intervention for the short-term management of unsafe behaviours in inpatient mental health services. There has been some sporadic interest in service users’ experiences of this.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review and meta-synthesis: data sources – databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PSYCINFO were searched in July 2015; review methods – the Joanna Briggs Institute’s Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument tools for critical appraisal and data extraction were used to review papers and synthesise findings.

Findings

A small number of papers were found, which were of mixed quality.

Originality/value

The existing research is limited in both quantity and quality. Although most participants from the existing research described seclusion as mostly negative with the potential for causing iatrogenic harm, some described more positive experiences, often in the context of compassionate interactions with staff.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Denning, L.J. Buckley and L.J. Roskill

June 13,1972 Industrial Relations — Unregistered trade union — Unpaid shop stewards elected by fellow members with union authority to negotiate at local level with dock…

Abstract

June 13,1972 Industrial Relations — Unregistered trade union — Unpaid shop stewards elected by fellow members with union authority to negotiate at local level with dock employers — Shop stewards initiating campaign of blacking container lorries after blacking by unregistered union knowingly inducing breaches of contract made “unfair industrial practice” by statute — Industrial Court orders to union to stop specified blacking — Union advice to shop stewards to obey court orders rejected — Court finding union in contempt and liable to fines and to compensate complainants for unfair industrial practices — Shop stewards agents, not servants of union — Whether evidence of implied authority from union to agents to black — Union not responsible for conduct of shop stewards acting outside scope of express or implied authority — Industrial Relations Act, 1971 (c.72) ss. 96(1), 101,167(1) (9).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fran Walsh and Anna Tickle

The purpose of this paper is to explore how those engaged in service user involvement (SUI) initiatives perceive involvement and recovery; whether involvement is related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how those engaged in service user involvement (SUI) initiatives perceive involvement and recovery; whether involvement is related to their recovery process and, if so, how.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative method, social constructionist grounded theory, was adopted throughout the research process. Nine semi-structured interviews were undertaken with participants who self-defined as having current or previous mental health problems and who were engaged in SUI initiatives.

Findings

Most participants identified explicit links between their own experiences of SUI and recovery. These links represented a connection between the characteristics they perceived to be inherent to involvement and their personal definitions of recovery. In contrast, experiences of consultation and involvement as patient service users was limited and identified as an area for improvement. The core of the tentative grounded theory constructed suggests that individuals found in involvement elements which were concordant with and supported their own definitions of recovery and which were not apparent in their experiences as patients.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample and narrow constituency of participants limit the nature of the claims made by the study.

Practical implications

This study highlights the value of involvement in promoting recovery and indicates the merit of promoting meaningful involvement across the spectrum of the service user experience.

Originality/value

This study offers a unique contribution to the current literature, highlighting the links made between involvement and personal recovery.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Jashim Khan, Jean-Eric Pelet and Somayeh Zamani

This study aims to expand the understanding of the implicit exposure of brands in Web dramas with congruent branding messages shared on social media Moments. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expand the understanding of the implicit exposure of brands in Web dramas with congruent branding messages shared on social media Moments. This study also aims to examine the mediating role of word of mouth (WOM) and brand love in the relationship between Web-drama connectedness and viewers’ intention to spend and spending per week.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 657 usable questionnaires were gathered from Chinese participants who watch the famous weekly drama “My Huckleberry Friends” and make weekly purchases from McDonald’s. Partial least squares regression was used to test the theoretical model of the study.

Findings

Results of this study reveal that WOM and brand love mediate the relationship between Web-drama connectedness and intention to spend on the exposed brand. Intention to spend mediates the relationship between brand love and spending. WOM mediates the relationship between Web-drama connectedness and spending.

Originality/value

Tencent’s WeChat is a well-known Chinese social media platform with a history of forbidding advertising. Users constantly flood social media with Web-drama content, influencing consumers’ spending habits. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the present study is one of the first attempts to develop an understanding of Web-drama connectedness, brand love, WOM and behavioural intention by tracing the spending on advertised brands. This study highlights how brands maintain consumer spending by enhancing brand love via Web-drama advertising and instigating ticklish moments as “print screens” of WOM on social media.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Carl Norwood, Anna Tickle, Danielle De Boos and Roberta Dewa

The involvement of service users within clinical psychology training is written into policy. However, the practice of evaluating involvement from both trainees’ and…

Abstract

Purpose

The involvement of service users within clinical psychology training is written into policy. However, the practice of evaluating involvement from both trainees’ and service users’ viewpoint is minimal. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate recent service user involvement in psychometrics and formulation teaching on a clinical psychology training programme, from both service user and trainee perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were held with service users (n=3) involved in the teaching, as well as trainees (n=3). Additional questionnaire data were captured from trainees (n=11). Service user and trainee data were analysed separately using thematic analysis. Themes generated for trainees were also mapped on to a competency framework for clinical psychologists.

Findings

Both parties found the teaching beneficial. Service users enjoyed supporting trainees and engaged positively in their roles. They identified relational aspects and reflections on their own therapy as other benefits. Trainees reported enhanced clinical preparedness, critical and personal reflection. Trainee anxiety was evident. Learning mapped well to competency frameworks.

Research limitations/implications

The samples were small and some data truncated. Findings speak to broader issues and may transfer to other involvement contexts.

Practical implications

A good degree of meaningful involvement can be achieved through such initiatives, to mutual benefit and enhanced learning.

Originality/value

Nature of the exercise and dual-aspect approach to evaluation described here helps to minimise tokenism. The mapping of findings to competency frameworks supports evaluative processes and helps to legitimise involvement initiatives that challenge the boundaries of existing practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Louise Canacott, Anna Tickle and Nima Moghaddam

The purpose of this systematic review was to address two questions: what is the qualitative evidence for the effects of the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) training…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this systematic review was to address two questions: what is the qualitative evidence for the effects of the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) training, as perceived by adults with mental health difficulties using it? What is the quality of qualitative literature evaluating WRAP?

Design/methodology/approach

Five electronic reference databases and the EThOS database for unpublished research were systematically searched, as well as two pertinent journals. Study quality was assessed using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme criteria and results analysed using thematic synthesis.

Findings

Of 73 studies, 12 qualitative papers met inclusion criteria and were generally good quality. Analyses demonstrated expected findings, such as increased understanding and active management of mental health in the context of group processes. Results also highlighted that WRAP training promoted acceptance and improved communication with professionals. Peer delivery of WRAP was highly valued, with contrasting perceptions of peers and professionals evident. Some cultural considerations were raised by participants from ethnic minorities.

Research limitations/implications

WRAP training participation has positive self-perceived effects beyond those captured by measures of recovery. Broader implications are suggested regarding earlier access to WRAP, professional support and communication between professionals and service users. Recommendations for further research include the relationship between social support and illness self-management and peer-delivered acceptance-based approaches. Multiple time-point qualitative studies could offer insights into WRAP training processes and whether changes are sustained.

Originality/value

As the first review of qualitative evidence regarding WRAP training, value is offered both through increased understanding of outcomes and also guidance for future research.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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