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Article

Sid Kessler and Gill Palmer

Examines the history of the Commission on Industrial Relations (CIR) 1969‐74 ‐ its origins, organization and policies ‐ and then evaluates its contribution as an agent of…

Abstract

Examines the history of the Commission on Industrial Relations (CIR) 1969‐74 ‐ its origins, organization and policies ‐ and then evaluates its contribution as an agent of reform in the context of the perceived problems of the 1960s and 1970s. Considers whether there are any lessons to be learnt for the future given the possibility of a Labour Government, developments in Europe and the 1995 TUC policy document Your Voice at Work. Despite the drastic changes in industrial relations and in the economic, political and social environment, the answer is in the affirmative. In particular, the importance of a new third‐party agency having an independent governing body like the CIR and not a representative body like the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS); in its workflow not being controlled by government; and in its decisions on recognition being legally enforceable.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

William McCarthy

Twenty‐five years on, the Director of Research of Britain′s RoyalCommission on Trade Unions and Employers′ Associations (1968) reviewssubsequent events in pay and incomes…

Abstract

Twenty‐five years on, the Director of Research of Britain′s Royal Commission on Trade Unions and Employers′ Associations (1968) reviews subsequent events in pay and incomes policies, analyses their contemporary relevance, particularly over the need for an “effective incomes policy”. From the starting point of the need for stable internal pay structures, the analysis covers the “cascade effect” of uncontrolled pay drift. Felt‐fair inequities (especially at management levels) are shown as a prime cause of pay inflation and (as a consequence) of high unemployment. Concludes with a four‐point agenda for change which tackles and differentiates the private and public sectors, and concludes with an indictment of performance‐related pay.

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Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

P.B. Beaumont, A.W.J. Thomson and M.B. Gregory

I. INTRODUCTION In this monograph we point out and analyse various dimensions of bargaining structure, which we define broadly as the institutional configuration within…

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION In this monograph we point out and analyse various dimensions of bargaining structure, which we define broadly as the institutional configuration within which bargaining takes place, and attempt to provide some guidelines for management action. We look at the development, theory, and present framework of bargaining structure in Britain and then examine it in terms of choices: multi‐employer versus single employer, company versus plant level bargaining, and the various public policy issues involved.

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Management Decision, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Roger Seifert

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief and partial overview of some of the issues and authors that have dominated British industrial relations research since…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief and partial overview of some of the issues and authors that have dominated British industrial relations research since 1965. It is cast in terms of that year being the astronomical Big Bang from which all else was created. It traces a spectacular growth in academic interest and departments throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and then comments on the petering out of the tradition and its very existence (Darlington, 2009; Smith, 2011).

Design/methodology/approach

There are no methods other than a biased look through the literature.

Findings

These show a liberal oppression of the Marxist interpretation of class struggle through trade unions, collective bargaining, strikes, and public policy. At first through the Cold War and later, less well because many Marxists survived and thrived in industrial relations departments until after 2000, through closing courses and choking off demand. This essay exposes the hypocrisy surrounding notions of academic freedom, and throws light on the determination of those in the labour movement and their academic allies to push forward wage controls and stunted bargaining regimes, alongside restrictions on strikes, in the name of moderation and the middle ground.

Originality/value

An attempt to correct the history as written by the pro tem victors.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Edward Tello, James Hazelton and Shane Vincent Leong

A primary tool for managing the democratic risks posed by political donations is disclosure. In Australia, corporate donations are disclosed in government databases…

Abstract

Purpose

A primary tool for managing the democratic risks posed by political donations is disclosure. In Australia, corporate donations are disclosed in government databases. Despite the potential accountability benefits, corporations are not, however, required to report this information in their annual or stand-alone reports. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quantity and quality of voluntary reporting and seek to add to the nascent theoretical understanding of voluntary corporate political donations.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate donors were obtained from the Australian Electoral Commission database. Annual and stand-alone reports were analysed to determine the quantity and quality of voluntary disclosures and compared to O’Donovan’s (2002) legitimation disclosure response matrix.

Findings

Of those companies with available reports, only 25 per cent reported any donation information. Longitudinal results show neither a robust increase in disclosure levels over time, nor a clear relationship between donation activity and disclosure. The findings support a legitimation tactic being applied to political donation disclosures.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that disclosure of political donations in corporate reports should be mandatory. Such reporting could facilitate aligning shareholder and citizen interests; aligning managerial and firm interests and closing disclosure loopholes.

Originality/value

The study extends the literature by evaluating donation disclosures by companies known to have made donations, considering time-series data and theorising the findings.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Content available
Article

Jason Donovan, Nigel Poole, Keith Poe and Ingrid Herrera-Arauz

Between 2006 and 2011, Nicaragua shipped an average of US$9.4 million per year of smallholder-produced fresh taro (Colocasia esculenta) to the USA; however, by 2016, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Between 2006 and 2011, Nicaragua shipped an average of US$9.4 million per year of smallholder-produced fresh taro (Colocasia esculenta) to the USA; however, by 2016, the US market for Nicaraguan taro had effectively collapsed. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the short-lived taro boom from the perspective of complex adaptive systems, showing how shocks, interactions between value chain actors, and lack of adaptive capacity among chain actors together contributed to the collapse of the chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from businesses and smallholders in 2010 and 2016 to understand the actors involved, their business relations, and the benefits and setbacks they experienced along the way.

Findings

The results show the capacity of better-off smallholders to engage in a demanding market, but also the struggles faced by more vulnerable smallholders to build new production systems and respond to internal and external shocks. Local businesses were generally unprepared for the uncertainties inherent in fresh horticultural trade or for engagement with distant buyers.

Research limitations/implications

Existing guides and tools for designing value chain interventions will benefit from greater attention to the circumstances of local actors and the challenges of building productive inter-business relations under higher levels of risk and uncertainty.

Originality/value

This case serves as a wake-up call for practitioners, donors, researchers, and the private sector on how to identify market opportunities and the design of more robust strategies to respond to them.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article

Kevin Hawkins

Whatever happens to some of the detailed provisions of the Government's forthcoming Industrial Relations Bill, it is obvious that everyone concerned in this field will…

Abstract

Whatever happens to some of the detailed provisions of the Government's forthcoming Industrial Relations Bill, it is obvious that everyone concerned in this field will soon have to acclimatise themselves to a new and highly‐regulated environment. It is interesting but not very profitable to speculate on the likely effects of the new legislation on strikes, wage inflation, restrictive practices and other contentious problems. Of much greater importance is the extent to which the proposed measures are designed to deal with the real problems in contemporary industrial relations. It is at least arguable that the now almost forgotten analysis of the Donovan Commission represents a far more realistic basis for change in industrial relations than anything contained in the Government's ‘Consultative Document’.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

TOM GORE

The recent wave of strikes, official and unofficial, in all kinds of economic and public activity, affecting all kinds of persons from children to pensioners, occasioning…

Abstract

The recent wave of strikes, official and unofficial, in all kinds of economic and public activity, affecting all kinds of persons from children to pensioners, occasioning suffering, misery and harm to the community in general, has caused January 1979 to be called ‘Black January’. Yet ten years ago, in January 1969 a White Paper entitled ‘In Place of Strife’ [Cmnd 3888] was published. The White Paper set out a policy for Industrial Relations. It was the policy of a Labour Government and had been designed in the light of the report of the Royal Commission on Trade Unions and Employers Associations which had been published in June 1968 [Cmnd 3623]. The main recommendations of the Report [called the Donovan Report] were embodied in the proposals for an Industrial Relations Act which is Appendix I in the White Paper. That paper, following Donovan, boldly states in para 2:

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part

Dawn Nicole Hicks Tafari

In response to the crisis affecting black boys in public schools (skewed numbers of black boys out of school on suspension and referred for special education services, as…

Abstract

In response to the crisis affecting black boys in public schools (skewed numbers of black boys out of school on suspension and referred for special education services, as well as low high school graduation rates), the researcher sought to amplify the voices of black male teachers who serve as walking counter-narratives for the boys they teach and with whom they interact on a daily basis (Lynn, 2006). This narrative study focuses on the interviews of four black male K-12 teachers, born between 1972 and 1987. The researcher listened to these teachers’ stories, observed selectivities, and silences (Casey, 1993), and looked for the patterns that arose among the educational, experiential, and cultural experiences that these teachers have had. Four themes emerged that addressed the influences on these men’s decisions to become K-12 teachers: the separate becomes connected, and the self is transformed; Black woman as inspiration; it takes a village; and transforming society by fighting students.I walk into the facility, and there was a little kid. He walks up to me and he, like he hits me on my arm, and he said, you know, uh, “Come and help me with my homework.” The kid doesn’t know me; I don’t know who this kid is and uh … I walk over, and I begin to help the kid with his homework, and when I started doing that, it was like, almost like immediately I knew for the first time this was the thing, this was the area I really wanted to be a part of … uhm … words can’t really explain it, but it was like something within myself I really knew this was the thing I’ve been missing. You know, this was the part that’s been missing for a while. This was the avenue that I been searching for. –Mr. Matthew Jamison

Details

Black Male Teachers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-622-4

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Article

Julia Anwar-McHenry, Catherine F. Drane, Phoebe Joyce and Robert J. Donovan

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily…

Abstract

Purpose

The Mentally Healthy Schools Framework (MHSF), based on the population-wide Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion campaign, is a whole-school approach primarily targeting student mental health, but it is also intended for staff. This paper presents the results of an impact survey on staff after the implementation of the Framework in a number of schools in Western Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A baseline questionnaire was completed by n = 87 staff at schools that had just signed up to the programme, and a participant questionnaire was completed by n = 146 staff at schools that had been participating for at least 17 months.

Findings

The results show that the Framework has had a substantial impact on many staff in terms of increased mental health literacy and taking action to improve their mental health.

Originality/value

Mental health interventions in schools generally focus on students' well-being and how to deal with student mental health problems. There are few comprehensive interventions that also include staff well-being.

Details

Health Education, vol. 120 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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