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Article

Trish Gibson, Donald Kerr and Ron Fisher

There is an acknowledged need to advance the supply chain management (SCM) learning agenda, with an emphasis on integration. This paper discuss an Australian…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an acknowledged need to advance the supply chain management (SCM) learning agenda, with an emphasis on integration. This paper discuss an Australian university–industry collaboration aimed at accelerating SCM learning and offers some insight into models for building a forward-looking SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is an exploratory case study of the industry–university collaboration, using grounded theory procedures. The primary data involved 25 interviews with key participants from the university and industry partners, and from the first cohort of students in the undergraduate program developed within the collaboration.

Findings

A theoretical framework for accelerating SCM learning was developed from the case study data; it comprises six constructs that influence, at strategic and operational levels, the acceleration of SCM learning. Four cross-construct concepts from the framework that form the cornerstones of accelerated learning are discussed in some detail.

Research limitations/implications

The framework facilitates an examination of successes and shortfalls in the case study collaboration and generates a deeper understanding of critical elements for progressing the SCM learning agenda, and expanding SCM education. As with all qualitative research, the results may not be generalisable; testing the relevance and usefulness of the framework with the field will be an important next step.

Practical implications

As the framework identifies conditions, characteristics and capacities of organisations and individuals that support the acceleration of SCM learning, it can provide assistance in designing future university–industry collaborations for advancing SCM learning.

Originality/value

The framework identifies critical success factors for alliances and partnerships aimed at accelerating learning in an emerging body of knowledge such as SCM.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Library Review, vol. 64 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Library Management, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article

Anne B. Piternick

In the fall of 1987, the first of three volumes of a scholarly research atlas—The Historical Atlas of Canada—was published to great acclaim. Describing the Atlas as “the…

Abstract

In the fall of 1987, the first of three volumes of a scholarly research atlas—The Historical Atlas of Canada—was published to great acclaim. Describing the Atlas as “the most innovative, beautiful and successful single volume on the history of Canada, and indeed the most ambitious cartographic venture ever attempted in this country,” the Royal Canadian Geographic Society awarded gold medals to the volume's editor, R.C. Harris, and cartographer/designer, Geoffrey J. Matthews, as well as to the director of the whole Atlas project, W.G. Dean. The volume received many honors, including the Sir John A. Macdonald Prize for the best book of the year on Early Canada from the Canadian Historical Association and the George Perkins Marsh Award in Environmental History from the University of Utah. Reviewers described the volume in superlatives. American reviewers were equally generous in their praise. Petchenik (herself the editor of the Historical Atlas of Early American History) described the volume as “an amazing accomplishment” and commented that “Not only a country but a civilization has been enriched by this publication.” Konrad assessed the volume as “a unique statement unrivaled in its potential impact.” Shuman, a professor of library science, noted that “this atlas, when complete, should stand as a model to be emulated by all other nations, whenever possible.” Pye, writing in the [British] Geographical Journal stated that “it is difficult to imagine that it could be even remotely paralleled in the foreseeable future.” Volume III of the Atlas appeared in 1990 and again won plaudits. Reviewers obviously felt that the high standards set by the first volume had been maintained.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Donald C. Kerr and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

Many algorithms have been proposed to form manufacturing cells from component routeings. Most of these methods require specialized algorithms for implementation. Some…

Abstract

Many algorithms have been proposed to form manufacturing cells from component routeings. Most of these methods require specialized algorithms for implementation. Some others use well known procedures such as integer programming. However, these may be difficult for practising managers to comprehend. Proposes a simple method that can be implemented using spreadsheet software. The method is based on similarity coefficients and a pair‐wise interchange procedure. Describes the method and the spreadsheet implementation. Compares our procedure with many existing procedures using eight well‐known problems from the literature. Using three evaluation measures shows that the proposed procedure is effective. Given its simplicity and effectiveness, it may be useful to practitioners and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Library Review, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

THE Prime Minister has exhorted … the Chancellor has cajoled … Prince Philip has advised … everyone who is anyone, in fact, has told British industry to export. But of…

Abstract

THE Prime Minister has exhorted … the Chancellor has cajoled … Prince Philip has advised … everyone who is anyone, in fact, has told British industry to export. But of some 55,000 manufacturing companies, a mere 600 are responsible for more than 66 per cent of our exports.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 74 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Article

MccPowell Sali Fombang and Charles Komla Adjasi

The study aims to examine the importance of access to finance in firm innovation by using firm-level data from the World Bank enterprise survey (WBES) on selected African…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the importance of access to finance in firm innovation by using firm-level data from the World Bank enterprise survey (WBES) on selected African countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises firm-level data from the WBES database and computes aggregate innovation index by using multiple correspondent analysis. The authors then apply instrumental variable models (to control for possible endogeneity between innovation and finance) to assess the link between finance and innovation.

Findings

The research finds that finance in the form of overdraft overwhelmingly drives innovation in all selected countries – Cameroon, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa. Trade credit enhances innovation among firms in Nigeria, South Africa and Cameroon, while asset finance drives innovation amongst firms in Cameroon, Nigeria and South Africa.

Practical implications

Policy incentives such as tax breaks could be put in place for financial intermediaries that have shown proof of extending loans to financially constraint firms to enable them to innovate. Furthermore, different financial institutions such as microfinance institutions can be supported to increase credit to enterprises. Partnerships with organisations willing to fund firms and support start-ups should be encouraged. One of such support mechanisms could be specialised schemes such as a credit guarantee scheme to encourage and secure lending to enterprises to promote innovation.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical insights into how finance enhances innovation in African enterprises. It also shows how different finance structures (overdraft, asset finance and trade credit) affect firm innovation in different African countries.

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Article

Elliott Shore

It is time for some different brand names. Librarians are notorious for unthinkingly ordering books from major publishers. There is an understandable logic at work: these…

Abstract

It is time for some different brand names. Librarians are notorious for unthinkingly ordering books from major publishers. There is an understandable logic at work: these are large and well respected companies and their products must meet rigorous standards in order to be published. A secondary assumption underlies the first; if the book isn't so hot or if it is controversial, the librarian can always make the argument that it is from a usually reliable source. Buying from established sources can also allow the selector to circumvent the rule, sometimes unwritten, that one or two favorable reviews are needed in order to purchase. And there are the added bonuses of CIP data and ease of ordering and handling.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Abstract

Details

Models for Library Management, Decision Making and Planning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-792-9

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