Search results

1 – 10 of 19
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Aneela Qadeer, Humera Anwer, Talat Mahmood and Muhammad Abbas Bhutto

Nutritional and medicinal properties of black sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) make it very valuable in traditional system of food. Minerals in Sesamum indicum play an…

Abstract

Purpose

Nutritional and medicinal properties of black sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) make it very valuable in traditional system of food. Minerals in Sesamum indicum play an important role to enhance its nutritional value. The present research comprises on proximate and chemical analysis of Sesamum indicum. This study is also based on the development of ashing methods for extraction of metals in black sesame seeds. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Black sesame seeds were taken from local market at Karachi-Pakistan. Proximate analysis of seeds comprises of moisture content, ash content and total metal content by EDTA titration. Digestion of this herb was done in different medium, i.e. HNO3, HCl, H2SO4 and simple ash (ash was prepared without using any acid). Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used for the analysis of metals, i.e. Fe, Zn, Cu and Mg in all these ashes.

Findings

From the results it is concluded that best medium for ashing is H2SO4, by which maximum ash (5.39±0.0021 per cent) produced. Qualitative analysis (based on Ksp values) also confirmed the presence of maximum number of metals in H2SO4 medium. Complexometric titration also revealed that maximum metal content was found to be in HCl and H2SO4 ash. Results from atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that H2SO4 is the best method for copper (0.399±0.0001 mg/g) and iron (0.3993±0.0015 mg/g), while simple ash can extract zinc and magnesium at their maximum level.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the best ashing method for the extraction of micronutrients, present in Sesamum indicum. These micronutrients are very beneficial for human health.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1909

The new sub‐department of the Local Government Board, recently created for the purpose of dealing with problems relating to the food supply as regards character and…

Abstract

The new sub‐department of the Local Government Board, recently created for the purpose of dealing with problems relating to the food supply as regards character and quality, is one apparently whose energies will, in the first place, bo chiefly directed to the institution of some control over the purity of the milk supply of the country. This National Pood Bureau appears to be primarily the outcome of the appeals that have been made from time to time to the authorities to exercise the powers invested in certain Government departments more stringently. Presumably attention will not be limited to the milk supply, important though that be, but in the near future various questions relating to cattle in general will bo dealt with. The two subjects of milk and meat are too closely allied to permit of each one being treated separately or without reference to the other. At the same time, if these closely related questions of milk and meat are to be adequately dealt with it is impossible to leave out of sight the subject of the wholesomeness or unwholesomeness of the imported meat that comes in such immense quantities into this country from abroad. At the present time the bulk of the meat so imported reaches this country from the United States, and in increasingly large quantities from South America. The justifiable outcry that was raised some years ago regarding the American meat packing scandals has, it would seem, quite died down; but unfortunately we have the strongest evidence that the temporary falling off in the trade in imported preserved meat between this country and the United States, which followed upon the agitation, has had but little salutary effect, and that the quality of the meat sent to this country from the United States still leaves much to be desired.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Swarnim Gupta, Krishnapillai Madhavan Nair, Ravinder Punjal, Ananthan Rajendran and Raghu Pullakhandam

The purpose of this paper is to screen for iron bioavailability and absorption-promoting activity in selected herbs. Evidence is needed to promote and practice food-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to screen for iron bioavailability and absorption-promoting activity in selected herbs. Evidence is needed to promote and practice food-based strategies such as use of plants or their parts for treating iron deficiency anemia.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight Indian herbs, considered to be iron rich and/or hematinic, namely, Boerhavia diffusa, Trachyspermum ammi, Amaranthus paniculatus, Lepidium sativum, Medicago sativa, Asparagus racemosus, Sesamum indicum and Piper longum, were selected. Their mineral composition and phytate and tannin contents were analyzed. Endogenous iron bioavailability was assessed in human enterocyte cell line model, Caco-2 cells, using cellular ferritin induction. Iron absorption-promoting activity was tested similarly in two herbs and their mineral extract by the addition of exogenous iron or ascorbic acid.

Findings

Based on compositional analysis, B. diffusa, L. sativum and T. ammi had high iron (> 40 mg/100 g) and tannin/phytate. A. paniculatus, M. sativa, P. longum, S. indicum had low iron (10-15 mg/100 g) with high phytate and tannin. A. racemosus had 38 mg/100 g iron and low phytate and tannin. None of the herbs induced Caco-2 cell ferritin, indicating poor endogenous iron bioavailability. Mineral solutions of, two contrasting herbs (inhibitor content), B. diffusa and A. racemosus induced ferritin with ascorbic acid and not with exogenous iron, suggesting that these are devoid of iron absorption-promoting activity.

Practical implications

Incorporation of such herbs in diets may enhance iron content but not its bioavailability.

Originality/value

Selected edible herbs have been screened for iron bioavailability and its absorption-promoting activity. This has implications in planning evidence-based strategies to correct iron deficiency in general population.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Dorji Nidup, Somboon Kietinun, Sunyarn Niempoog and Kusuma Sriyakul

Rtsa-byugs, a massage oil from Bhutan, is a traditional herbal formula known for its anti-inflammatory properties and used in osteoarthritis treatment. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Rtsa-byugs, a massage oil from Bhutan, is a traditional herbal formula known for its anti-inflammatory properties and used in osteoarthritis treatment. This study investigates the efficacy of rtsa-byugs vs diclofenacgel in relieving knee pain in osteoarthritis patients.

Design/methodology/approach

A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted amongst osteoarthritis knee patients at an orthopedic outpatient department of Thammasat University Hospital. Participants were randomly allocated to the rtsa-byugs (N = 31) or the Diclofenac gel (N = 31) group. Primary outcomes were assessed by the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome scores (KOOS), visual analog scale (VAS) and goniometer at day 0, 1, 3, 7.

Findings

62 participants completed the study. The result of the KOOS scores demonstrated a significant improvement of symptoms at the end of the study in both treatment groups. Improvement of symptoms, pain, daily life living, sport and recreational score and quality of life assessment showed a significant difference from baseline (p < 0.001) within both groups. The quality of life score for the rtsa-byugs group increased significantly on day 3 and 7. The VAS score in both groups decreased with a significant difference from baseline to day 7. The mean value of extension of angle measurement was decreased in day 7, and the mean of flexion score increased in both groups when compared with the baseline.

Research limitations/implications

The duration of the study was very limited and included a small sample consisting of men and women.

Originality/value

Rtsa-byugs is safe and effective in relieving pain from osteoarthritis of the knee and can be used as an alternative treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Nasirullah, Pravin Kumar and Rizwan Shariff

Nutraceuticals which have nutritional and therapeutic properties cannot be consumed directly due to their off flavor hence, a carrier in the form of microcapsules may be a…

Abstract

Purpose

Nutraceuticals which have nutritional and therapeutic properties cannot be consumed directly due to their off flavor hence, a carrier in the form of microcapsules may be a better option for their application in foods. The purpose of this paper is to describe the preparation of nutraceutical barriers as microcapsulels.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutraceutical concentrates were isolated using methanol from sesame (Sesamum indicum), linseeds (Linum usitatissimum), black mustard (Brassica napus), yellow mustard (Brassica compestris) and niger seeds (Guizotai abyssinica) employing established protocol. These concentrates were further purified, enriching active ingredients using column chromatography to remove hydrocarbons, gums and other non‐polar inactive materials. These purified concentrates were subjected for sesamol, tocopherol, polyphenol and β‐carotene estimations. Subsequently, they were converted into microcapsules using spray drying, inclusion complexation and liposomal entrapment techniques.

Findings

The scanning electron microscope image of the spray‐dried nutraceutical concentrates isolated from sesame seeds showed that microcapsules were spherical in shape with 5‐25 μm in diameter with mean particle size of 10 μm with smooth outer surface and bee net like inner structure which yielded a uniform and smooth wall of microcapsules. Thickness of the wall was found to be 2‐5 μm. Sesamol, tocopherol, polyphenol and β‐carotene found to be ranging between 35,600 and 0; 14,520 and 890; 35,800 and 5,900 and 890 and 290 ppm. The encapsulation efficiency of spray drying, inclusion complexation and liposomal entrapment was 75.5, 54 and 58 percent, respectively, which considered to be good efficiency. The moisture content of the powders were found to be between 4 and 5 percent. The difference between the highest and the lowest moisture content at each relative humidity was about 0.5 percent. The percent nutraceutical concentrate adhering to the surface of granules during above encapsulation ranged between 1 and 5.5 percent.

Originality/value

Much work has been done on the nutraceuticals but information is very scarce on nutraceutical carriers. To carry the nutraceuticals to the site of delivery in intact form, nutraceutical carriers are inevitable. This paper describes how to prepare nutraceutical carriers as microcapsules by using spray drying, complexation and liposome entrapment procedures to obtain stable granules which can be used in food applications.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Mamta Tandon, Padma Vasudevan, S.N. Naik and Philip Davies

A variety of biomass plantations are being raised for energy production. This case study is on energy production potential of seasonal oil bearing crops in India. These…

Abstract

Purpose

A variety of biomass plantations are being raised for energy production. This case study is on energy production potential of seasonal oil bearing crops in India. These crops have the advantage of producing oil (liquid fuel) as well as biomass as agro residue (solid fuel). The purpose of the study is to estimate total energy yields of oil bearing crops and compare with other types of energy plantations. Also oil bearing crops bioaccumulate metals and thus phytoremediate soil. This provides scope for waste water irrigation.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant published papers on energy production by raising oil bearing crops have been analyzed. The effect of waste water irrigation and agronomic practices on increasing productivity is given special attention.

Findings

It is shown that the seasonal oil bearing crops such as castor have a high potential to generate energy and this is comparable to energy produced by many perennial grasses. The energy yields of castor under irrigated condition was 196×103 MJ/ha and this is comparable to the reed canary grass which yields 195×103 MJ/ha. Some of the oil bearing crops are also super accumulators of certain toxic metals.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, only all the accessible papers on the topic could be analyzed.

Practical implications

This case study indicates that raising oil bearing crops such as castor using waste water has many advantages which include high energy yields, utilization of waste water for productive purpose and phytoremediation of soil.

Originality/value

The comparison made between various types of energy crops for their energy generation is an original contribution. Findings of economic and environmental benefits by waste water irrigation are also of value.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Sunil Nautiyal and Harald Kaechele

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the conservation and management of crop diversity in traditional agro‐ecosystems as a crucial component for sustainable landscape…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the conservation and management of crop diversity in traditional agro‐ecosystems as a crucial component for sustainable landscape development in the mountains of the Indian Himalayan region. The results indicate that mountain farming has the potential to produce good output from a low input system where farmers still use local resources and locally developed technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion of major issues in this paper is based on our empirical study involving a survey of the area and field‐based experiments to evaluate the productivity in traditional mountain farming systems. Additionally, landscape change was monitored with the use of satellite data.

Findings

The paper finds that the rate of genetic erosion within the study area during the last three decades is documented and the factors responsible for such erosion identified. The efficiency of traditional agro‐ecosystems of Himalayan Mountains in terms of energy and monetary value is presented. Traditional crop cultivation in the region appears efficient from the viewpoint of ecology of the area and economy of the local people.

Practical implications

This paper recommends practical options to encourage cultivation of traditional crops for their conservation and management in the Himalayan agro‐ecosystems that will lead to sustainable landscape development in these mountains. Traditional agro‐ecosystems are characterized by their dependence on local resources, close links to the surrounding forests, and locally developed technologies in the Himalayas of India. Research and policy support for their conservation in traditional agro‐ecosystems in this region is required as many traditional crops and their landraces are in jeopardy due to their rapid genetic erosion in the region. The land use land cover map developed within this study enables observation of the process of the landscape change trends in the region. Local communities need proper awareness and encouragement through appropriate research, institutional and policy support to continue growing traditional crops for both their economic incentives and management of the ecosystem services.

Originality/value

The paper shows that traditional crop diversity can enhance the economic conditions for people without having negative implications on the surrounding landscape.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Arora Preetika, Ghugre Padmini and Udipi Shobha

The purpose of this paper is to develop easily reconstitutable nutrient dense mixes using natural food ingredients for enteral feeding, in developing countries. Three…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to develop easily reconstitutable nutrient dense mixes using natural food ingredients for enteral feeding, in developing countries. Three mixes were prepared using various combinations of malted wheat, sorghum, finger millet, pearl millet, green gram, linseed and sesame seeds and/or whey proteins and analyzed for nutrient composition and selected quality parameters. It was found that when reconstituted as tube feeds they compared well with the guidelines given by the American Gastroenterological Association. The mixes were not analyzed for all the nutrients and not tested on patients. Opines that they would provide nutritional support at relatively lower cost compared with commercial formulations for varied clinical conditions. Simple indigenous technologies using natural ingredients were employed for formulating the mixes. These mixes would be beneficial for enteral feeding in developing countries in lieu of commercial formulations, which tend to be expensive.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Temitope Omolayo Fasuan, Cynthia Chioma Anyiam, Linda Obianuju Ojokoh, Judith Uchenna Chima, Titilope Modupe Olagunju, Kingsley Osita Okpara and Kenneth Chigozie Asadu

Pasta is popularly consumed in developed and developing countries. Many low-income homes that could not afford protein-rich foods consumed pasta without further…

Abstract

Purpose

Pasta is popularly consumed in developed and developing countries. Many low-income homes that could not afford protein-rich foods consumed pasta without further supplements as a meal. However, pasta is deficient in protein and some other health-promoting substances. Deoiled sesame and amaranth flours are rich in protein, minerals, amino acids, antioxidants and many non-nutrient-based health benefits. Formulating a nutrient-dense pasta product (spaghetti) would reduce protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and improve the health status of pasta consumers. This study aims to investigate some bioactive, nutrients and non-nutrient components of developed and optimized spaghetti pasta from deoiled sesame, amaranth and modified sorghum starch blend.

Design/methodology/approach

Amaranth, sorghum and sesame grains were sorted, wet-cleaned and dried. Sesame grain was roasted while starch was extracted from sorghum grain. The innate starch was modified by heat-moisture treatment. The prepared grains and starch were milled into flours and formulated into different flour mixtures using the Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology and the process was modeled and optimized. The flour mixtures were made into spaghetti pasta. Proximate, mineral, amino acids, biological value, protein efficiency ration, phytochemical, antioxidant activity, physico-functional and sensory properties of the formulated spaghetti were evaluated using standard procedures.

Findings

An optimal mixture of deoiled sesame (31.12g/100g), amaranth (56.56g/100g) and modified sorghum starch (12.32g/100g) were established, which yielded protein (25.79g/100g), appearance (96.65%), taste (94.57%) and acceptability index (97.37%). The spaghetti was significantly (p-values ranged from 0.001 to 0.018) superior in protein, ash, fat, fiber, calcium, magnesium, zinc, alkaloids, total phenolic, flavonoids, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazl (DPPH) and ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) relative to the control (100% wheat flour). Amino acid showed that the product is rich in histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and threonine. The high essential amino acid index of the product indicated that it is a good protein source. The spaghetti was significantly (p-values ranged from 0.001 to 0.021) superior in aroma, taste and acceptability index relative to the control.

Originality/value

This study showed the feasibility of developing spaghetti pasta from deoiled sesame, amaranth grains and modified sorghum starch. The production process described in this study is scalable; and the process could be applied on a small scale for the development of self-entrepreneurs and industrially. The high protein content of the product indicated that it could be used to reduce PEM in developing countries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Hsioh‐yu Hou

The agricultural resources of China vary with its differentgeographic regions. China is divided into six geographic regions and theclimate, flora and fauna of each are…

Abstract

The agricultural resources of China vary with its different geographic regions. China is divided into six geographic regions and the climate, flora and fauna of each are described, together with the ecological relationship between them. Suggestions are given of how best to exploit, utilise and protect these resources.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of 19