Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Alastair G. Smith

This paper explores resource discovery issues relating to New Zealand/Aotearoa information on the WWW in the twenty‐first century. Questions addressed are: How do New…

Abstract

This paper explores resource discovery issues relating to New Zealand/Aotearoa information on the WWW in the twenty‐first century. Questions addressed are: How do New Zealand search engines compare with global search engines for finding information relating to New Zealand? Can search engines find everything that is available on the web? What are effective strategies for finding information relating to New Zealand on the web? What is the quality of NZ information on the web? What can librarians do to make NZ information more accessible on the web? Based on a study, it concludes that neither local nor global search engines are by themselves sufficient, and that to maximize retrieval a variety of engines is necessary. The NZ librarian can play a role in ensuring that NZ information is made both available and accessible. Although the paper discusses the situation in New Zealand, the results and conclusions are applicable to other countries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Alastair G. Smith

This study evaluates the retrieval of New Zealand information using three local New Zealand search engines, four major global search engines and three metasearch engines

Abstract

This study evaluates the retrieval of New Zealand information using three local New Zealand search engines, four major global search engines and three metasearch engines. Searches for NZ topics were carried out on all the search engines, and the relative recall calculated. The local search engines did not achieve higher recall than the global search engines or metasearch engines, but no search engine achieved more than 45 percent recall. Despite the theoretical advantage of searching the databases of several individual search engines, metasearch engines did not achieve higher recall. Of relevant pages for the queries, 36 percent were outside the .nz domain. Implications for searching for geographically specific information, and for evaluation of search engines, are discussed.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Dirk Lewandowski

Search engines usually offer a date‐restricted search on their advanced search pages. But determining the actual update of a web page is not without problems. Conducts a…

Abstract

Search engines usually offer a date‐restricted search on their advanced search pages. But determining the actual update of a web page is not without problems. Conducts a study testing date‐restricted queries on the search engines Google, Teoma and Yahoo! Finds that these searches fail to work properly in the engines examined. Finally, discusses implications of this for further research and search engine development.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Sungin Lee, Wonhong Jang, Eunsol Lee and Sam G. Oh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of, and identify core techniques of, search engine optimization (SEO) techniques applied to the web (http://lg-sl.net

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of, and identify core techniques of, search engine optimization (SEO) techniques applied to the web (http://lg-sl.net) and mobile (http//m.lg-sl.net) Science Land content and services at LG Sangnam Library in Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

In accordance with three major SEO guidelines, ten SEO techniques were identified and applied, and their implications were extracted on three areas: improved search engine accessibility, increased relevance between site content and search engine keywords, and improved site credibility. The effects were quantitatively analyzed in terms of registered search engine keywords and influx of visits via search engines.

Findings

This study shows that SEO techniques help increase the exposure of the library services and the number of visitors through search engines.

Practical implications

SEO techniques have been applied to a few non-Korean information service organizations, but it is not a well-accepted practice in Korean libraries. And the dominant search engines in Korea have published their own SEO guidelines. Prior to this study, no significant endeavors have been undertaken in the context of Korean library services that have adopted SEO techniques to boost exposure of library services and increase user traffics.

Originality/value

This is the first published study that has applied optimized SEO techniques to Korean web and mobile library services, in order to demonstrate the usefulness of the techniques for maximized exposure of library content.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Dion H. Goh and Rebecca P. Ang

Pay for performance (PFP) search engines provide search services for documents on the Web, but unlike traditional search engines, they rank documents not on content…

Abstract

Pay for performance (PFP) search engines provide search services for documents on the Web, but unlike traditional search engines, they rank documents not on content characteristics, but according to the amount of money the owner of a Web site is willing to pay if a user visits the Web site through the search results pages. A study was conducted to compare the retrieval effectiveness of Overture (a PFP search engine) and Google (a traditional search engine) using a test suite of general knowledge questions. A total of 45 queries, based on a popular game show, “Who wants to be a millionaire?”, were submitted to each of these search engines and the first ten documents returned were analysed using different relevancy criteria. Results indicated that Google outperformed Overture in terms of precision and number of queries that could be answered. Implications for this study are also discussed.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Amanda Spink, Bernard J. Jansen, Vinish Kathuria and Sherry Koshman

This paper reports the findings of a major study examining the overlap among results retrieved by three major web search engines. The goal of the research was to: measure…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports the findings of a major study examining the overlap among results retrieved by three major web search engines. The goal of the research was to: measure the overlap across three major web search engines on the first results page overlap (i.e. share the same results) and the differences across a wide range of user defined search terms; determine the differences in the first page of search results and their rankings (each web search engine's view of the most relevant content) across single‐source web search engines, including both sponsored and non‐sponsored results; and measure the degree to which a meta‐search web engine, such as Dogpile.com, provides searchers with the most highly ranked search results from three major single source web search engines.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected 10,316 random Dogpile.com queries and ran an overlap algorithm using the URL for each result by query. The overlap of first result page search for each query was then summarized across all 10,316 to determine the overall overlap metrics. For a given query, the URL of each result for each engine was retrieved from the database.

Findings

The percent of total results unique retrieved by only one of the three major web search engines was 85 percent, retrieved by two web search engines was 12 percent, and retrieved by all three web search engines was 3 percent. This small level of overlap reflects major differences in web search engines retrieval and ranking results.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an important contribution to the web research literature. The findings point to the value of meta‐search engines in web retrieval to overcome the biases of single search engines.

Practical implications

The results of this research can inform people and organizations that seek to use the web as part of their information seeking efforts, and the design of web search engines.

Originality/value

This research is a large investigation into web search engine overlap using real data from a major web meta‐search engine and single web search engines that sheds light on the uniqueness of top results retrieved by web search engines.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Mary L. Robinson and Judith Wusteman

To describe a small‐scale quantitative evaluation of the scholarly information search engine, Google Scholar.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe a small‐scale quantitative evaluation of the scholarly information search engine, Google Scholar.

Design/methodology/approach

Google Scholar's ability to retrieve scholarly information was compared to that of three popular search engines: Ask.com, Google and Yahoo! Test queries were presented to all four search engines and the following measures were used to compare them: precision; Vaughan's Quality of Result Ranking; relative recall; and Vaughan's Ability to Retrieve Top Ranked Pages.

Findings

Significant differences were found in the ability to retrieve top ranked pages between Ask.com and Google and between Ask.com and Google Scholar for scientific queries. No other significant differences were found between the search engines. This may be due to the relatively small sample size of eight queries. Results suggest that, for scientific queries, Google Scholar has the highest precision, relative recall and Ability to Retrieve Top Ranked Pages. However, it achieved the lowest score for these three measures for non‐scientific queries. The best overall score for all four measures was achieved by Google. Vaughan's Quality of Result Ranking found a significant correlation between Google and scientific queries.

Research limitations/implications

As with any search engine evaluation, the results pertain only to performance at the time of the study and must be considered in light of any subsequent changes in the search engine's configuration or functioning. Also, the relatively small sample size limits the scope of the study's findings.

Practical implications

These results suggest that, although Google Scholar may prove useful to those in scientific disciplines, further development is necessary if it is to be useful to the scholarly community in general.

Originality/value

This is a preliminary study in applying the accepted performance measures of precision and recall to Google Scholar. It provides information specialists and users with an objective evaluation of Google Scholar's abilities across both scientific and non‐scientific disciplines and paves the way for a larger study.

Details

Program, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Sebastian Schultheiß and Dirk Lewandowski

In commercial web search engine results rankings, four stakeholder groups are involved: search engine providers, users, content providers and search engine optimizers…

Abstract

Purpose

In commercial web search engine results rankings, four stakeholder groups are involved: search engine providers, users, content providers and search engine optimizers. Search engine optimization (SEO) is a multi-billion-dollar industry and responsible for making content visible through search engines. Despite this importance, little is known about its role in the interaction of the stakeholder groups.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted expert interviews with 15 German search engine optimizers and content providers, the latter represented by content managers and online journalists. The interviewees were asked about their perspectives on SEO and how they assess the views of users about SEO.

Findings

SEO was considered necessary for content providers to ensure visibility, which is why dependencies between both stakeholder groups have evolved. Despite its importance, SEO was seen as largely unknown to users. Therefore, it is assumed that users cannot realistically assess the impact SEO has and that user opinions about SEO depend heavily on their knowledge of the topic.

Originality/value

This study investigated search engine optimization from the perspective of those involved in the optimization business: content providers, online journalists and search engine optimization professionals. The study therefore contributes to a more nuanced view on and a deeper understanding of the SEO domain.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2012

Dirk Lewandowski

Purpose — The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the context of Web search and search engine related research, as well as to introduce the reader to the…

Abstract

Purpose — The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the context of Web search and search engine related research, as well as to introduce the reader to the sections and chapters of the book.

Methodology/approach — We review literature dealing with various aspects of search engines, with special emphasis on emerging areas of Web searching, search engine evaluation going beyond traditional methods and new perspectives on Web searching.

Findings — The approaches to studying Web search engines are manifold. Given the importance of Web search engines for knowledge acquisition, research from different perspectives needs to be integrated into a more cohesive perspective.

Research limitations/implications — The chapter suggests a basis for research in the field and also introduces further research directions.

Originality/value of paper — The chapter gives a concise overview of the topics dealt within the book and also shows directions for researchers interested in Web search engines.

Details

Web Search Engine Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-636-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Zoe Dickinson and Mike Smit

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges and benefits presented by search engine visibility for public libraries. This paper outlines the preliminary results…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges and benefits presented by search engine visibility for public libraries. This paper outlines the preliminary results of a pilot study investigating search engine visibility in two Canadian public libraries, and discusses practical approaches to search engine visibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of semi-structured interviews with librarians from two multi-branch Canadian public library systems, combined with quantitative data provided by each library, as well as data obtained through site-specific searches in Google and Bing. Possible barriers to visibility are identified through thematic analysis of the interviews. Practical approaches are identified by the author based on a literature review.

Findings

The initial findings of this pilot study identify a complex combination of barriers to visibility on search engines, in the form of attitudes, policies, organizational structures and technological difficulties.

Research limitations/implications

This paper describes a small, preliminary pilot study. More research is needed before any firm conclusions can be reached.

Practical implications

A review of the literature shows the increasing importance of search engine visibility for public libraries. This paper outlines practical approaches which can be undertaken immediately by libraries, as well as delving into the underlying issues which may be affecting libraries’ progress on the issue.

Originality/value

There has been little original research investigating the reasons behind libraries’ lack of visibility in search engine results pages. This paper provides insight into a previously unexplored area by exploring public libraries’ relationships with search engines.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000