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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Jodie Duggan and Carol A. Phillips

The numbers of reported cases of Listeria particularly Listeria monocytogenes in the UK have remained at a relatively low level since the peak which occurred in 1988‐1989…

Abstract

The numbers of reported cases of Listeria particularly Listeria monocytogenes in the UK have remained at a relatively low level since the peak which occurred in 1988‐1989. The majority of cases are sporadic and often the source of contamination is unknown. This study investigates the possibility that the home environment, which has previously been found to be the most common place of contamination for other bacteria, also provides a reservoir for human infection by Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria spp.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Will M. Waites, Christine E.R. Dodd and Kathy J. Bolton

The problems produced by changes in agricultural and foodmanufacturing practices, which have resulted in increases in reportedcases of food‐borne illness, are discussed in…

Abstract

The problems produced by changes in agricultural and food manufacturing practices, which have resulted in increases in reported cases of food‐borne illness, are discussed in relation to Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium botulinum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica. Those areas where further research is urgently required in order to understand and reduce food‐borne microbial illness are examined, and solutions proposed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Sujoya Sukul and Mini Sheth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of NaOCl and KMnO4 at two levels in reducing the microbial load of coriander leaves.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of NaOCl and KMnO4 at two levels in reducing the microbial load of coriander leaves.

Design/methodology/approach

Fresh coriander leaves procured from various markets were intensively sampled and administered to wash treatments with tap water and sanitizers at two levels. Hi media pre plated plates were used for determination of TPC (Total Plate Count), Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella and coliforms.

Findings

Unwashed coriander leaves showed TPC beyond the acceptable limits of 105 CFU/g. Bulk washing (10 g sample dipped in 1 litre tap water for 5 minutes) did not significantly reduce TPC and any of the pathogens. TPC decreased significantly by 1 log cycle up on treatment with 200 ppm NaOCl and 100 ppm KMnO4. Staphylococcus aureus could be reduced more effectively with 100 ppm of KMnO4; Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella showed significant reductions (P<0.05) using both sanitizers. Shigella decreased by more than 1 log cycle when treated with 100 ppm KMnO4.

Practical implications

Tap water is not sufficient to reduce the microbial load of fresh coriander. Use of 100 ppm NaOCl and 50 ppm KMnO4 may be considered to reduce the pathogenic load of coriander leaves. Since reduction of pathogenic load by 1 log cycle is insufficient, other means of disinfecting the raw produce need to be tested. Also, use of good irrigation practices and aseptic post harvest techniques cannot be ignored.

Originality/value

This is an original study, wherein use of sanitizers should be promoted in order to reduce the microbial load of coriander leaves.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Adrian Eley

We are now very much aware of the hazards associated withsalmonella and listeria in foodstuffs. Newer methodologies are comparedwith conventional techniques for their…

Abstract

We are now very much aware of the hazards associated with salmonella and listeria in foodstuffs. Newer methodologies are compared with conventional techniques for their rapid detection. Recent developments in culture media are discussed, as is a new rapid culture test kit for salmonella. Novel techniques such as ELISA, nucleic acid probes and flow cytometry are described, and a comparative assessment is made of reported findings. Nucleic acid probe and ELISA assays are considerably quicker than traditional culture techniques but they would benefit from increased sensitivity; they show inferior specificity with listeria and are still dependent on an enrichment stage. Recent DNA amplification techniques could provide a solution to the problem of poor probe sensitivity and allow the direct detection of pathogens from food samples. Flow cytometry may have the potential for high sensitivity and specificity and could be useful for on‐line monitoring in factories.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Derek Mozley

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities…

Abstract

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities commenced. If challenged on the order of their importance, cricketers and Empire‐builders may be excused their preference. However, looking at it purely from the standpoint of pro bono publico, the dispassionate observer must surely opt for the birth of a certain publication as being ultimately the most beneficial of the three.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Karmen Godic Torkar, Andrej Kirbiš, Stanka Vadnjal, Majda Biasizzo, An Galicic and Mojca Jevšnik

The purpose of this paper is to study the microbiological quality of raw milk delivered by 17 vending machines (VM) owned by different Slovenian milk producers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the microbiological quality of raw milk delivered by 17 vending machines (VM) owned by different Slovenian milk producers.

Design/methodology/approach

For the determination of hygiene-technical conditions of VM, an observation list that included criteria for estimation of hygiene-technical suitability was made. A total of 51 milk samples were collected in three different seasons. The swabs and the cleaning liquid (eluates) of dispensing nozzles and chambers were also sampled. The main groups of microorganisms were determined by colony count technique according to international standards in all collected samples.

Findings

The aerobic colony count was higher than 100,000 CFU/mL in 20 (39.2 per cent) of milk samples. Its mean value was 4.8 log10 CFU/mL. The mean values of Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic microorganisms, lipolytes, proteolytes, yeasts and moulds together, coagulase-positive staphylococci and somatic cell count were 3.3 log10 CFU/mL, 4.1 log10 CFU/mL, 3.2 log10 CFU/mL, 3.9 log10 CFU/mL, 2.2 log10 CFU/mL, 2.8 log10 CFU/mL and 5.3 log10 cells/mL, respectively. E. coli was found in 33.3 per cent of milk samples, while Listeria monocytogenes and antibiotics were not detected. The inner surface contamination of the dispensing nozzles and chambers was estimated in the range from 1.8 log10 CFU to 6.0 log10 CFU/cm2. The presence of detergents and disinfectants in supply valve eluates was determined in more than one-third of the samples. The hygienic-technical conditions of observed VM show some deviations from specified hygienic-technical requirements which could influence the safety of raw milk.

Research limitations/implications

The data about construction and the cleaning practice of VM, included in the experiment, were not available during the inspection facility.

Originality/value

In the paper the pathogenic and also the spoilage microorganisms in milk in the combination with hygienic conditions of inside surfaces of VM were studied.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Richard J. Gilbert

Despite increased education and legislation to raise standards of hygiene in all aspects of food handling, a definite increase is reported in food‐borne infections and…

Abstract

Despite increased education and legislation to raise standards of hygiene in all aspects of food handling, a definite increase is reported in food‐borne infections and intoxications in the UK. The main bacteria are examined here and, since it is envisaged that the number of reported cases is likely to increase still further in future years, recommendations are put forward which are aimed at improved education rather than legislation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Barbara M. Lund

Listeriosis in animals and humans has been known for over 60 years.Outbreaks in humans have been reported since 1951 but the importance offoodborne transmission has only…

Abstract

Listeriosis in animals and humans has been known for over 60 years. Outbreaks in humans have been reported since 1951 but the importance of foodborne transmission has only been realised recently. Listeria monocytogenes is of concern to the food industry because of its ability to grow at refrigeration temperatures and the serious nature of listeriosis. Surveys have shown a widespread incidence of L. monocytogenes in foods and high numbers in certain foods. Hygienic practices in food production are being modified to reduce this incidence, and conditions to minimise the survival and growth of listeria in foods are being determined. Listeriosis is still a relatively rare disease and the majority of people may be resistant, or develop immunity to the bacterium. Because of the fact that a significant proportion of the population is likely to be vulnerable to infection, and the trend towards increased consumption of chilled foods which may have an extended shelf life, it is important to minimise the incidence of listeria in foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

R.W. Lacey

Investigates the conditions surrounding the spread of the bacteriumListeria monocytogenes and the implications for food safety,including cook‐chill food production…

Abstract

Investigates the conditions surrounding the spread of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes and the implications for food safety, including cook‐chill food production, temperature, contamination and storage. Concludes that food can never be made entirely microbiologically safe but the risks can be minimized.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Zohreh Mashak, Ali Zabihi, Hamidreza Sodagari, Negin Noori and Afshin Akhondzadeh Basti

– The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an important foodborne pathogen in different kinds of meat.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes as an important foodborne pathogen in different kinds of meat.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 410 samples, including fresh and frozen meats of turkey, quail, chicken, ostrich, cattle, sheep and camel, fresh chicken liver and fresh minced meat were gathered and then analyzed according to USDA-FSIS method. To enumerate L. monocytogenes, the MPN procedure was used and also, strains were serotyped by using commercial specific antisera.

Findings

It was found that 28.05 percent of samples were positive for L. monocytogenes and the contamination of beef meat was higher than the others. The range of microbial load was from <2 to 940 MPN g−1. Most of the samples (94.39 percent) had a microbial load of <100 MPN g−1. Moreover, 56 percent of the strains belonged to serogroup 1, especially to 1/2a, although, the most frequently isolated serotype was serotype 4b (38.3 percent) in all samples. These findings indicate the potential risk of contamination in different kinds of meats by L. monocytogenes.

Originality/value

This survey is of academic value and of value to those working in the food hygiene and safety. Also, to the best knowledge of these researchers, there has been no serious research on this topic with all its aspects in Iran.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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