International Perspectives in Social Justice Programs at the Institutional and Community Levels: Volume 37

Cover of International Perspectives in Social Justice Programs at the Institutional and Community Levels
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(15 chapters)

Prelims

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Part I: Education as a Fundamental Right

Abstract

The Sustainable Development Goals promoted by United Nations (UN) advocate that education is a fundamental right for human beings, and free universal primary education should be accessible to all regardless of gender or country of origin. Education on human rights aims to provide information on fundamental rights, equality and being non-discriminatory in nature by having its universal appeal. Learners should be exposed to human rights education and to relate it to their cultural context and build on real-life experience. Students should be encouraged to foster participation in creating a learning environment free from fear and upholds empowerment and human rights values. Universities and faculty members play a vital role in imparting education that helps build a strong foundation of society where people are respected and treated equally and gets equal opportunity for upward social mobility while protecting the dignity of such rights. This book addresses the role of education to uplift people out of poverty and oppression by imparting social justice education at the institution and the community level. Chapters are dedicated to human rights education which talks about fostering a sense of awareness among learners about the dignity of human life through various interventional programs. Such rights are discussed with respect to migrant workers, foster youth and prisoners in different countries and how students from all levels can benefit from such education.

Abstract

Education is a fundamental right that can lift people out of poverty, empower women, safeguard children from exploitative labor and promote democracy. In this sense, the right to education, which is recognized in several treaties, cannot be separated from the right to an education in human rights. The latter is crucial to the realization of human rights and contributes significantly to achieving equality, tolerance and respect for the dignity of others. Plus, through education in human rights, people would also not become more sympathetic about our differences, but they would also be empowered to demand and exercise their own rights, which will certainly contribute to their observance and implementation. This introductory chapter will explore why education in human rights is one of the most powerful tools to prevent atrocities and to guarantee every person a dignified life. Consequently, it will also argue that it is vital to integrate human rights education into the curriculum and classroom. Furthermore, this chapter will consider the right to receive this kind of education and the State’s obligation to guarantee it. Finally, it will analyze the best ways to teach human rights in higher education through active learning (simulations, discussions, role-play and moot courts).

Abstract

Education is a fundamental factor of development, preparing the educated for a better tomorrow. Education serves to improve quality of life, is a means of enhancing the economic growth for individuals and nations and provides a way for marginalized children and adults to exchange lives of desperation, poverty and injustice for those illuminated with liberty, justice and self-determination. Education is declared by the United Nations as a human right. This chapter presents one model to teach for human rights through experiential learning. It shares a unique experience of education and business students in their immersion trip to Zambia. The model used to develop the partnership is integral human development (IHD). This chapter provides description of the model, how it was implemented and shares direct citations from students’ reflection journals highlighting three themes: communication, reciprocity and self-exploration.

Abstract

UN has been advocating compulsory and free education for all, as specified in the Millennium Development Goal. Education is a right of every human being, and it is the right to realize other rights. It is the right toward social mobility and achieves economic stability in life. Every year hundreds and thousands of people from the developing world leave their homes in search of livelihood. They undertake a perilous and life-threatening journey in search of jobs. Often, they are motivated with the desire to earn more and ensure a better livelihood for them and their families back home. At times they are driven by persecution, genocide, or natural disasters. Bangladesh has been a source of immigrant workers who have been seeking employment mainly as unskilled workers outside their country. These workers who work in construction sites, malls, or as domestic help have a “shelf life” which barely exceeds the age of 50 years. This study conducted in a province of Kurdistan in northern Iraq explores the fear of losing their livelihood post 50 years of age. In most cases, these workers have not been educated and have not received any skill development training, which would enable them to remain as the bread earner long after they have returned home. Both quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted with 149 workers from Bangladesh who has been staying and working in Duhok. The findings have been explained, and suitable recommendations were provided in keeping with the data analysis.

Abstract

United Nation’s Standard Minimum Rules for Treatment of Prisoners, popularly known as Nelson Mandela Rules categorically advocates for the Prison Education and its integration with the educational system of the country. Moreover, principles for the treatment of prisoners, adopted by United Nation in 1990, guarantee that prisoners retain the human rights and fundamental freedoms set out in Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which includes right to take part in education also. However, there is little sensitization about the rights of prisoners in many countries. The issue has gained prominence as several international organizations have now raised concern on these matters.

Education of jail inmates has attracted the attention of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) systems in India. Among all the ODL institutions, Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) has been the major role player. Right from its first initiative to have a special study center in Tihar Jail in 1994, IGNOU’s network for jail inmates has undergone significant expansion. The university has now strong presence in the prisons. Under a special collaborative arrangement with Ministry of Home Affairs, IGNOU has started free education to jail inmates from 2010. This chapter gives a glimpse about the model being followed by IGNOU for providing education inside prisons, highlights its good practices, gaps in its functioning and makes recommendations for further strengthening of this network.

Abstract

Work-integrated learning (WIL) and service learning are widespread approaches to experiential, practice-based learning in Australia. Both are associated with extensive bodies of research that support their benefits to students, industry, and the community at large. What is less explored, however, is the accessibility of such experiences. In Australia, there are several groups of students that are at a disadvantage in terms of participation in WIL and service learning. When considering access to higher education as an emerging human right, the importance of addressing these inequalities becomes even more clear.

This chapter draws on case studies of pedagogical and curriculum changes that challenge existing power structures from within the curriculum and improve the accessibility and inclusiveness of WIL. This includes a research project that informs redesigning WIL experiences to better suit the needs of students including, a pilot project to improve international student access to service learning, and the development of a Community Internship module that weaves First Peoples’ knowledge and perspectives throughout. While by no means exhaustive, these cases represent the start of ensuring that all aspects of higher education, including experiential, practice-based aspects, are accessible to all students.

Part II: Promoting Social Justice Among Students

Abstract

Plato and contemporary thinkers including American philosopher Martha Nussbaum have emphasized the need for political consciousness among the youth. Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defence of Reform in Liberal Education by Nussbaum expressed that

It would be catastrophic to become a nation of technically competent people who have lost the ability to think critically, to examine themselves, and to respect the humanity and diversity of others.

It would be catastrophic to become a nation of technically competent people who have lost the ability to think critically, to examine themselves, and to respect the humanity and diversity of others.

Ideologically, it has been proven that advancement in technology can shift social ethos if we use it intelligently and then technology can lead to activism.

Digital activism can be defined as the use of electronic communication devices, for example, social media, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, e-mail, e-blogging, micro-blogging and podcast for different forms of activism. It enables citizens to express ideology and spread information to a large audience regarding human rights. In this context, researchers have explored the level of digital activism among pupil teachers and found very little awareness regarding the same. Findings also reveal that the level of digital activism does not have any significant effect on attitude toward human rights and peace. Although findings reveal that attitude toward peace and human rights is positively correlated with each other. Therefore, on the basis of the findings, an intervention program for digital activism has been suggested at the end of this chapter that can foster digital activism among them.

Abstract

The global Clinical Legal Education (CLE) movement transcends borders as law teachers worldwide try to inculcate law students and future legal practitioners with social justice values. One method of achieving this is through developing reflective practitioners. Kolb, finding common ground in the work of Lewin, Dewey, and Piaget, formulated the four stages in the experiential development of concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experiment. Although Kolb’s model is used in legal education literature, students may not be provided with the relevant conceptual tools required to engage in reflective practice. This often results in students providing subjective analysis of their work, which fails to fully contribute to their educational experience. One of the reasons for omitting analytical tools is that reflective practice suffers from a lack of conceptual clarity. According to Kinsella, the “concept remains elusive, is open to multiple interpretations, and is applied in a myriad of ways in educational and practice environments”. A further issue hindering reflective practice relates to Donald Schön’s critique of the positivist approach adopted by law schools.

This chapter will apply a human rights framework to CLE to develop reflective practitioners. The two main reasons for this are, first, human rights as formulated by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights are universal, interrelated, and indivisible and, second, reflection based on these universal human rights values will benefit cross-jurisdictional societies in assisting vulnerable clients affected by emerging implied and direct human rights challenges.

Abstract

The authors use their university and its writing program as a case study to interrogate established wraparound support systems for foster youth and the role that additional, volunteer faculty – led support services can play in retention and graduation rates. This chapter first provides research on college-going foster youth in the United States. Then, it considers the foster youth population and established support programs at the University of California, Riverside. Next, this chapter reviews the benefits of faculty – student mentoring and tutoring, specifically in composition studies, and how those benefits can contribute to a successful college-going experience. The chapter then shifts to offering a model for those interested in establishing a similar program. Using business, communication, composition, education, and psychosocial theory to ground the discussion, the authors provide a detailed account of the proposal, implementation, and ongoing programmatic administration processes, including the rationale undergirding decision-making. Ultimately, they show how equitable supplemental academic support led by composition faculty can bridge the gap between existing foster youth services and outstanding needs, an innovative approach that relies on the natural mentoring relationships which organically evolve from faculty–student interaction.

Abstract

This chapter presents the findings of a Gender and Leadership study on promoting gender responsiveness and equality in Ghanaian Colleges of Education (CoEs) conducted in 2017. Specifically, this chapter explores CoEs actors’ perspectives on and experiences with using predetermined gender-responsive scorecard (GRS) as a strategy for promoting gender equality within the CoEs. Multiple-case study involving 10 CoEs selected purposively was used to explore the GRS implementation. Data collection and analysis methods included semi-structured interviews and “processual” analysis. The findings revealed a general contradiction among respondents regarding which gender actions/strategies had been implemented in the case study CoEs. Nonetheless, amid reported implementation challenges, there was general acknowledgment of the importance of the GRS in running gender-responsive CoEs in Ghana. The study concludes that the effective use and implementation of the GRS strategies appear imperative in promoting female success in CoEs, not only in Ghana but also in contexts where gender gap is an issue in teacher education.

Abstract

The societal role of universities (u-pillar) is a long-standing discussion dividing the education researchers worldwide. Entering the sphere of the eminent Nordic education model (NEM), we aim at grasping its contemporaneity with regard to social value creation (SVC) and to the promotion of equality in education (EiE).

A theoretical review of literature revisits the foundations of the NEM in the light of the postmodern education challenges and the inherent governance practices of higher education institutions (HEIs) in the global eduscape.

One of the oldest HEIs in Denmark, Niels Brock Copenhagen Business College (NBCBC), is here instrumentalized as the target case research. The latter exhibited a sophisticated educational design, oriented toward digital apprenticeship and cumulative proximity to the students’ population of both national and international cohorts.

Name Index

Pages 215-222
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Subject Index

Pages 213-217
Content available
Cover of International Perspectives in Social Justice Programs at the Institutional and Community Levels
DOI
10.1108/S2055-3641202137
Publication date
2021-04-09
Book series
Innovations in Higher Education Teaching and Learning
Editors
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
ISBN
978-1-80043-489-9
eISBN
978-1-80043-488-2
Book series ISSN
2055-3641