University Partnerships for International Development: Volume 8

Cover of University Partnerships for International Development

Table of contents

(17 chapters)

Prelims

Pages i-xii
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Part I: Concepts and Principles

Abstract

The authors of this volume present a wide range of perspectives, case studies, and theories on partnerships for international development. The authors discuss the leadership approaches, principles, frameworks, and elements needed to develop effective university partnerships for international development. In the age of globalization, these types of international partnerships are an essential element to drive political reform, social development, and economic growth, and as such, they have become an essential element in today’s global system of higher education. Within the context of a rapidly changing higher education system, international collaborations encourage diverse and inclusive learning environments. Readers of this volume will also understand the principles for making international joint activities structurally sound and socially oriented.

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Abstract

US universities are increasingly addressing issues of equity and social justice through global learning programs with international partners. Growing numbers of universities now prioritize the development and implementation of international programs such as study abroad, and service learning to fulfill components of missions and visions focused on educating global citizens. This chapter discusses how global citizenship goals intersect with social justice education through global learning programs such as study abroad and global service learning. It also describes the conceptual frameworks that inform teaching and learning in this domain and highlights current examples of partnerships and overseas institutions that focus on goals of social justice and developing the global citizen. Finally, this chapter will discuss future challenges for US universities in further developing international partnerships for social justice.

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Part II: Successful Practices

Abstract

This chapter introduces ASPIRE as an example of international collaboration and cooperation, involving 12 universities drawn from 8 countries running over a four-year period. With funding in excess of €1.3m ($US 1.4m), provided by the European Union, it brought together an eclectic mix of private and public institutions unified by a number of common aims and objectives (Mehtap, 2014). It reports and reflects upon the first-hand direct experiences of both authors own participation in the ASPIRE Project over the four years the Project ran.

The success of the project would be determined by the extent to which mutual trust and respect could be established between partners. The intended outcomes included cross institutional capacity building, innovative curriculum design and the development of a footprint beyond the project for further collaboration and cooperation in research, learning and teaching strategies; what the European Union refers to as legacy. One of the many successes, the launch of the Centre For Entrepreneurship (CFE) at Beirut Arab University is used as an exemplar by the authors to illustrate as to how the coming together of international university partners can act as a catalyst to empower and engage the local faculty’s enthusiasm to establish such a legacy in enterprise and entrepreneurship teaching.

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Abstract

International service-learning (ISL) programs are proliferating in American colleges. Usually the stakeholders involved (colleges, local host communities, and nonprofit organizations) undertake a single or few projects, such as housing construction, in a host country from a few weeks to months during an academic year. In most ISL programs, national governments of the host countries are not participants. Using a case study, this chapter shows how an American college can collaborate with a foreign national government to implement an ISL partnership. The case study involves the ISL partnership between North Carolina Central University and the Liberia Civil Service Agency. The students are from the Executive Master of Public Administration program that requires students to complete at least two weeks of service in government agencies in a developing country. Students are therefore provided the opportunity to gain valuable experience working on projects in Liberian government agencies, while the University provides research and policy analysis for the agencies. The diversity of projects in various agencies provides students the opportunity to gain experience in government administration in Liberia, thereby broadening their knowledge and education. A single ISL project administered by a nonprofit organization may not provide such opportunities.

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This chapter presents two case studies on university collaborations with international Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) and Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs): The first with Global Brigades, a student led service learning working in Nicaragua; and the second with the East African Community, headquartered in Arusha, Tanzania. The case is made that University partnerships with these types of organizations represent a promising new shape of strategic partnerships that serve the needs of students and in-country stakeholders alike. For the students that are involved in hands on international development work, applied experience is critical; for the NGOs/IGOs and the communities they serve, such partnerships with University can supply vital resources, labor, and powerful learning outcomes for the students. Finally, for the universities entering these types of partnerships, the benefit is providing opportunities for their students that are high impact and experiential and meaningful. The chapter concludes with the notion that these partnerships represent a successful strategy that blends practical and applied skillsets in the realm of international development, and encourages more partnerships of this type.

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Adopting an EU policy lens, this chapter primarily addresses the proposed pivotal role of firm-level innovation capability (FLIC) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as a stimulant of sustainable development (SD) and green growth in Ireland/Wales. The chapter specifically examines the scale and scope of the green economy (GE), and considers the importance of organizational inherent “green” innovation capabilities (GICs) to achieve it. Underpinning the study is the methodology and concept of utilizing a facilitated cross-border multi-stakeholder learning network to enable knowledge transfer and exchange practices to flourish between partners, acting as a significant predictor of the development of SME GICs structures. Specifically, against the backdrop of the Green Innovation and Future Technologies (“GIFT” hereafter) INTERREG 4A Project, the research assesses how academic–industry partner exchange and inter-group learning and cooperation facilitates the development of GICs in smaller enterprises to realize a sustainable smart green economy in Ireland.

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This chapter examines the extent to which place based and research oriented university-community engagement (UCE) models can sustain UCE in “non-campus” rural settings. It examines how effective partnerships function in non-campus rural settings, and their contributions to achieving the reciprocal aims of communities and universities. It highlights the key successes, challenges, and opportunities experienced through case studies in non-campus locations in rural Australia (Flinders University Rural Clinical School), rural Sweden (Centre for Rural Health, Storuman), and rural Canada (Northern Ontario School of Medicine). Information provided about the discussed case studies has been provided by the organizations themselves, and the chapter authors are heads of these organizations. The authors share their knowledge of the history, the challenges, the opportunities, and the mechanisms through which the models interact with the partners.

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This cooperative alliance between a university and a nonprofit, private organization was initiated with the goal of developing capacity building measures for improving medical health and welfare in the rural village of Ocoroni in Northern Sinaloa, Mexico. Drawing from the literature on organization development and action research, it provides a detailed overview of the design and implementation of the work which was involved in this collaborative partnership. The outcomes are presented and with accomplishments noted, indicating that the initiative had a positive impact for the local community in Ocoroni, while simultaneously providing research opportunities and cross-cultural learning for faculty, graduate students, healthcare practitioners, volunteers, residents from the village and others who were involved the project.

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The oversight of ethical conduct of research is often placed on the university institution in partnership research. How institutions ensure the ethical conduct of research varies and for research being done with Indigenous communities, communities themselves are now conducting their own research ethics reviews. However, this chapter aims to place some onus of responsibility on the researcher themselves, to develop their own moral compass when working with Indigenous communities. (Borrowing from Toombs (2012). Ethical research for indigenous people by indigenous researchers. Aboriginal & Islander Health Worker Journal, 36(1), 24–26.) notion of the moral compass, the authors will discuss their own experiences as Indigenous researchers and how a moral compass is critical even in light of the best research ethics policies.

The authors focus on the Canadian and Australian context and provide examples from their own experiences as Indigenous people, researchers, and research ethics administrators. The focus of this chapter is to highlight some of the unethical research that has been conducted on Indigenous peoples and the policy and community response to that research. The authors explore how to build better relationships through research with Indigenous peoples.

This chapter does not aim to provide a thorough review of literature on research ethics with Indigenous peoples; however, some of this literature is cited. The focus of this chapter is to share the experiences related to policy from the perspective of two Indigenous researchers.

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Between 2008 and 2011 academic teaching staff from Leeds Beckett University (UK) and Chainama Hills College of Health Sciences (Zambia) worked together on a Development Partnership in Higher Education (DelPHe) project funded by the Department for International Development (DFID) via the British Council. The partnership focused on “up-scaling” the provision of mental health education which was intended to build capacity through the delivery of a range of workshops for health educators at Chainama College, Lusaka. The project was evaluated on completion using small focus group discussions (FGDs), so educators could feedback on their experience of the workshops and discuss the impact of learning into their teaching practice. This chapter discusses the challenges of scaling up the mental health workforce in Zambia; the rationale for the content and delivery style of workshops with the health educators and finally presents and critically discusses the evaluation findings.

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This chapter describes a particular course that was undertaken as part of a partnership between three community institutions: a classroom of college undergraduate learners, residents of a local homeless outreach center, and the members of a neighboring social justice oriented Christian community. The project was an interdisciplinary endeavor, facilitated by the authors who represent the humanities, specifically Religious Studies and Education. The students in the course represented a cross-section of the institution where the authors teach: various majors, both declared and undeclared; students from different enrollment years; various ages; and mixed race and ethnicity. The first part of this chapter addresses a theoretical framework related to community-based learning and service-learning related to the role of such partnerships in higher education with specific focus on a particular course. The second part addresses the significance of the social change model and purposeful student self-reflection within such partnerships as a way to enhance student learning. The final part of the chapter includes an evaluation of the community collaboration with respect to process and student learning.

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One Health

Pages 207-227
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One Health is defined as an approach of integrating animal, human, and environmental health to mitigate diseases. One Health promotes public health by studying all factors, such as agriculture, food, and water security, mechanisms of toxicity and pathogenesis of acute and chronic diseases, sociology, economics, and ecosystem health (to name a few). Such an approach is essential because human, animal, and ecosystem health are inextricably linked; therefore, with this One Health approach, we are called to work together to promote, improve, and defend the health and well-being of all by enhancing cooperation and collaboration between physicians, veterinarians social scientists, economists, psychologists, legal professionals, philosophers, and other scientific health and environmental professionals. As such, the One Health movement and approach is a growing vision in global health and is gaining increasing recognition by national and international institutions, organizations, stakeholders, NGOs, and health policymakers. Likewise, the role of world-class universities is pivotal in discovering One Health scientific knowledge and translating them to policy and evidence-based practices. Universities have responsibilities to train future professionals capable of solving global health issues through interdisciplinary scientific knowledge, integrative approaches to teaching, research collaboration, community linkages, and leadership. This chapter discusses the importance of One Health and the role of higher education institutions’ One Health partnerships to improve global health.

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This chapter focuses on the University of Cincinnati (UC), named by the 2016 Princeton Review as one of the “Nation’s Best” institutions for undergraduate education (Robinette, T., 2015, August 4. UC continues streak of recognition as one of nation’s best universities. Retrieved from http://www.uc.edu/news/nr.aspx?id=22016), and their commitment to growing international experiential learning opportunities for its student population in accordance with strategic plans and focused administrative goals. One department identified by UC for strategic growth of international experiential learning opportunities is the Division of Experience-Based Learning and Career Education. An International Experiential Learning Committee (IELC) was formed to help study, crystallize, and move forward these university initiatives.

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About the Authors

Pages 247-257
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Author Index

Pages 259-266
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Subject Index

Pages 267-270
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Cover of University Partnerships for International Development
DOI
10.1108/S2055-364120178
Publication date
2016-12-10
Book series
Innovations in Higher Education Teaching and Learning
Editors
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
ISBN
978-1-78635-301-6
Book series ISSN
2055-3641