Advances in Hospitality and Leisure: Volume 10

Subject:

Table of contents

(18 chapters)
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Editorial Board

Pages xiii-xiv
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Abstract

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 as well as the European Union Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) are two established management tools to evaluate, report and improve the environmental performance of businesses. The purpose of this chapter is the development and testing of a model on motivations, benefits, barriers and preconditions to the implementation of environmental management system (EMS) in the German hotel sector. One hundred and thirty six hotels have been identified as having implemented either ISO 14001 or EMAS (or both) in their operations. An analysis showed various correlations between motivations and perceived benefits of implementing an EMS, whereas no correlation could be measured between preconditions and barriers. Finally the preconditions, barriers, motivations and benefits were examined based on various characteristics of the hotels surveyed, which revealed significant differences among the different subgroups, such as chain-operated hotels and independently owned properties, or between luxury properties and budget operations.

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the effects of macroeconomic and non-macroeconomic variables on Singapore hotel stock returns using hotel companies listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange (SGX). Data were obtained from the Singapore Department of Statistics, PULSES, and CEIC database. Regression procedures and residual tests were carried out using an econometric program, E-Views. The derived model which consisted of the significant macroeconomic variables and the unexpected non-macroeconomic variables was established. Results of stability and predictive power tests of the derived model inferred that the model was stable and reliable in explaining hotel stock returns and was also reliable for forecasting. Regression analyses indicated that changes in industrial production and money supply displayed positive relationships whilst exchange rates, inflation, short- and long-term interest rates showed negative relationships with Singapore hotel stock returns.

Abstract

Research on consumer innovativeness has been studied in the field of marketing during the past decade, in that it has become critical to firms and businesses introducing new products. Yet as the literature concerning innovativeness in the hospitality sector is extremely limited, the purpose of this study is to better conceptualize and understand innovativeness in the hospitality sector (e.g., hotel, restaurant & bar, food & beverage, and occupational training). Using a qualitative method, personal interviews have been collected in this study from local hospitality managers and data are analyzed by constant comparative analysis. Eight themes emerge from the interview data: (1) novelty seeking, (2) eagerness, (3) vigilance, (4) openness, (5) venturesome, (6) hedonism, (7) value seeking, and (8) social distinctiveness. These intrinsic characteristics capture the concept of innovativeness in a broader range within different perspectives. The resultant data could therefore be utilized in future research to evaluate the level of awareness and use of perceived innovativeness in consumer behavior research and business marketing.

Abstract

Since waiting in a queue may induce both negative and positive effects on customers’ quality perceptions of which the queue is formed, an optimal queuing wait which is long enough but not too long to have positive effects on the pursued service is critical for successful queuing management. This study examined the existence of an optimal queuing wait at theme parks by merging the interpretative approach of institutional norms with the measuring application of the adapted Return Potential Model from crowding studies. Using quota and systematic sampling techniques, survey data were collected from 1,440 visitors to five leading theme parks in Taiwan. An optimal queuing wait represented by an institutional norm among visitors with moderate consensus for the longest acceptable waiting time (LAWT) was revealed in this study. As a critical reversal point of visitors’ quality perception, significant ascent of visitors’ crowding perception did occur when their actual waiting times exceeded their LAWT.

Abstract

Green or ecological consumers can gradually become a prominent market segment. The purpose of this study is to investigate tourists’ behavior intentions for staying overnight at green hotels by integrating environmental education (EE) from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) perspective. Data of 350 usable questionnaires for this research were collected from a quasi-random selection of people at the checkout counter of three of the 19 winners of the 2008 green hotel competition in Taiwan. This result indicates that a green hotel that provides green service can be supported by supporting EE. The findings and applications of this study are useful for both academia and practitioners.

Abstract

The aim of this chapter was to investigate aspects of risks that are associated with tropical destinations and to develop a model that may be used to classify tourists according to the level of risk they were prepared to engage in. Overall, the level of perceived risk was small with sunburn found to be the risk factor showing the highest level of concern followed by animal-related risks and illnesses. The findings suggest that tourists can be classified into three distinct groups based on the level of risk they are prepared to accept in activities found in a tropical destination: low-risk takers; moderate risk takers; and risk takers. From a destination marketing perspective the findings suggest that while concerns about risk are not particularly high tourists are aware of risks that may be encountered in tropical destinations and attention needs to be given to strategies to minimise the level of risk exposure faced by tourists.

Abstract

The relationship between tourism development and its impacts on resident attitudes toward tourism has been widely discussed in literature. Not much attention, however, has been paid to residents’ role in tourism from the perspective of place identity theories. Based on a conceptual framework introduced by Palme, Koenig-Lewis, and Jones, this study applied the social identity theory in examining the relationship between resident’s place-based social identity and support for tourism. The results showed that both the cognitive and affective social identity components had significant effects on resident’s conative attitudes of support for tourism. What remains unsolved is which component is more significant and should be targeted in destination marketing. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed and recommended.

Abstract

Literature and practice show that the integration of feminine characteristics into leadership in the management of hotel organizations is becoming increasingly important. Although some leading hotel chains claim to further this integration by encouraging women to develop their career paths upwards into the higher management ranks, little research has been conducted into this phenomenon. This is why this study seeks to assess and elaborate the current status of attempts to integrate feminine aspects into leadership within the hotel industry. The qualitative study held among hotel managers demonstrates that the terms ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ are confusing. Additionally, when feminine and masculine leadership are considered, these terms are not carefully implemented. Hence, there is a strong need for greater in-depth knowledge and effective training to enhance the successful implementation of feminine and masculine leadership in the hotel industry.

Abstract

In response to issues and challenges facing the operators of nature-based tours, this study examines snowmobile tours in Svalbard, Norway. Specially, it posits to explore experience providers awareness of the fragile nature in which they are operating and how this awareness is implemented in their offerings. Subsequently, the chapter evaluates experience providers’ attitude of what aspects of the offerings they perceive as attractive to the tourists and the staging of the offerings accordingly. This study utilises interviews with six informants representing three different firms, a participant observation, and text analyses of the offer on the website www.Svalbard.net as the study method. The results show that the informants are aware of the fragile nature and strive to promote a sustainable behaviour during tours. In particular, they focus on informing and teaching the tourists about environmental aspects of the tour through storytelling and staging during the tour. By empowering the tourists through education and involvement they aim to make the tourists change their focus from riding the snowmobile to learning about the fragility of the nature and wildlife. Further, the informants state that the tourists may even become spokesmen for sustainable tourism due to the touring experience received. In conclusion, in a highly fragile environment like the Arctic a rise of motorised tours invites discourses on tourism development. It is pivotal to preserve the nature in a sustainable way while offering attractive tour experiences.

Abstract

As the hospitality industry is shifting its focus from service to experience, customers are becoming co-creators of the perceived value of a hospitality service because experiences customers obtained when consuming a hospitality service involve the participation of the customers. Thus, more research is needed to examine the relationships among consumer’s personal factors and their evaluations of hospitality services. This study developed and tested hypotheses that examined the effects of customers’ intrinsic characteristics on their evaluations of a restaurant service. Data were collected from college students in the United States (n = 220) and China (n = 254) using a scenario approach. Findings reveal that customers’ gender, personality, and cultural background had significant effects on their evaluations of a restaurant service. Specifically, female customers rated the same service higher than male customers on the reliability dimension of service quality and overall service quality; customers with personalities of extroversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness rated the service higher than customers with neuroticism personality on the responsiveness dimension; and customers in individualistic cultures rated the service higher than those in collectivistic cultures on most of the service evaluation measures. Implications of the study’s findings are discussed.

Subject Index

Pages 199-200
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DOI
10.1108/S1745-3542201410
Publication date
2014-09-20
Book series
Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
ISBN
978-1-78441-174-9
Book series ISSN
1745-3542