Advances in Global Leadership: Volume 10

Cover of Advances in Global Leadership
Subject:

Table of contents

(11 chapters)

Prelims

Pages i-xxv
click here to view access options

Part I Empirical Findings and Theoretical Propositions

click here to view access options
Abstract

Despite the need for effective global leaders on the part of business (McKinsey, 2012) and the growing body of empirical research related to the topic of global leadership (Osland, 2013a), very little is known about what global leaders actually do. How do they spend their time? In what kinds of activities are they involved? How do they communicate, coordinate, make decisions, and lead? How is their work similar to or different from that of domestic leaders? In this chapter, we respond to these questions by exploring the nature of global leaders’ work using an approach similar to Mintzberg (1973) in his classic book, The Nature of Managerial Work. We observed five global leaders from five different industries, each for 1 week, and compared our results with Mintzberg’s (1973). In addition, we conducted informal interviews and collected archival data. We content-analyzed the data using the conventions of grounded theory and identified 10 distinguishing characteristics of global leaders’ work. It is characterized by (1) multiple time zones and geographical distance; (2) long hours; (3) flexible schedules and fluid time; (4) dependence on technology; (5) time alone connected to others; (6) extensive travel; (7) functional expertise with global scope; (8) facilitation of information, advice, and action; (9) management of complexity; and (10) confrontation of risk. We conclude by discussing implications for future global leadership research.

Abstract

The rapidly growing body of global leadership literature still lacks research on both global change and global leader cognition. This chapter presents two case studies describing large-scale global change efforts led by expert global leaders. This is complemented with the results of cognitive task analysis interviews with the two expert global leaders. The findings include task diagrams of the change process they employed and knowledge audits of the most difficult cognitive step in the change processes they led. The audit identifies the elements of expert cognition they utilized, the cues and strategies they employed, and the perceived difficulties novices would experience in similar situations. The findings confirm previous research, solidifying the role and nature of expert cognition in global leaders. We conclude with a discussion of the implications our analysis holds for research and practice.

Abstract

Global leadership involves the ability to connect with individuals from different cultures. Connecting is an actionable process that creates mutual understanding, positive feeling, and a common approach to collaborate. Forming interpersonal connections can be an effective way for global leaders to cut across cultural differences as it is based on a universal human need for belonging. Our study aims to understand the specific actions global leaders engage in to connect with people across cultures. Furthermore, we examine how identity experiences of multicultural individuals contributed to their capabilities of connecting with people from different cultures in their role of global leader. Through a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with multicultural individuals in global leadership positions, we develop a model of connecting across cultures involving specific leadership actions that lead to emotive, cognitive, and behavioral dimensions for connection. Our model also illustrates how multicultural identity experiences equip global leaders with qualities such as empathy, perspective-taking, and integration, which enable them to engage in actions for connecting to people across cultures. The research in this chapter contributes to a better understanding of global leadership with novel insights into how global leaders connect to people and sheds light on the advantages of multicultural identity experiences in this process.

Abstract

The process of global leadership development remains a challenging theoretical problem in the field of global leadership. To help address this issue, we develop a theoretically grounded process model of global leadership competency development that addresses the dynamics involved in the adoption and enhancement of intercultural competencies associated with global leadership. We do this by integrating theoretical constructs associated with competency development from the adult learning and development, cognitive-behavior therapy, global leadership development, leadership development, organizational development, and social learning theory literatures. The resulting model includes testable propositions – a critical feature that existing global leadership development process models currently lack. Our chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model for future research and practice.

Part II The Practitioner’s Corner

Abstract

Nonprofits that expand their work beyond their home country’s borders have to perform in unfamiliar territory, with unfamiliar risks, in cooperation or collaboration with unfamiliar people, on topics or problems that likely sit at the intersection of public, private, and social sectors. How can a global nonprofit’s leaders best prepare themselves to meet these challenges when taking an organization global or seeking to gain traction in new geographies? To answer these questions, this chapter describes four prominent ensemble configurations, and then suggests what global nonprofits can do to develop leaders who can pull the most value from diversity. It also describes four distinct “blueprints” for operating models, and how to shift to a different model, as a leadership team, with members who, together, possess a deep knowledge of the various markets in which the nonprofit operates.

Abstract

In this chapter, J. Stewart Black reflects on his 30 years of working with global leaders from over 100 countries in executive development programs at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, Thunderbird, the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, IMD, and INSEAD, and in numerous research projects, consulting experiences, and advisory roles. In his reflections, he discusses the increased relevance of global leadership for today’s firms, what he believes the key capabilities are for effective global leadership, and what the implications of those capabilities are for developing global leaders.

Abstract

This essay reflects on over two decades of developing global leaders while simultaneously studying global leadership phenomena. Global leadership is leading across contexts. Because the contexts of global business continuously evolve, so too must our understanding of global leadership and our research about it. When research and practice inform each other in constant iteration, we can develop knowledge that is robust and relevant, and identify emerging ideas that shape future knowledge and practice. The essay suggests that exceptional, high-impact global leaders demonstrate two characteristics in addition to the competences and qualities identified in most research. Self-acceptance is an internal orientation, an acknowledgement of one’s own strengths, weaknesses, and reasons for leading. It underlies the ability to manage the impact of one’s self on others, and creates a leadership space for empowerment of others. Community transcendence is an external orientation, an acknowledgement of the primacy of local for creating meaning in business and work. It enables a leader to take on a local identity and create a leadership space for the community to succeed through the global organization. The essay concludes with speculation on the future importance of these two qualities.

Abstract

Over the past 2 decades CEO surveys have consistently identified a shortage of global leadership capability as a limiting factor in global expansion. At the same time, business schools have also come to recognize the need to develop global leadership in their graduates. The Global Leadership Expertise Development (GLED) model proposes a framework and process for developing global leadership competencies in a corporate setting. We describe how we applied this model in a higher education context, in the process transforming a more common approach to international business (IB) education into an experientially-intensive global leadership development program. Adopting elements of Kolb’ experiential learning theory (ELT) as well as concepts of instructional scaffolding and “red threads,” the program emphasizes personal development. Early analysis of the program’s impact points to substantial progress in developing global leader competencies in undergraduate business students.

Abstract

San Jose State University’s (SJSU’s) Global Leadership Advancement Center (GLAC) was established in 2007 in response to a reported scarcity of global leaders in all sectors. Its mission is to advance, foster, and disseminate knowledge on global leadership and its development. The center created various programs in three focal areas: Knowledge Creation and Dissemination, Development and Training, and the Social Innovation Initiative. We briefly explain the assessment center, the GLLab (Global Leadership Laboratory), used to varying degrees in all development programs and courses. This chapter describes in detail three of GLAC’s innovative global leadership efforts and their theoretical foundations – an undergraduate global leadership course, the GLLab Exchange Program, and the Global Leadership Passport Program. All GLAC programs are based on research and best practices, which are referenced.

Conclusion

Abstract

Based on our review of the global leadership literature over the past 5 years, we delineate patterns and themes in the field’s scholarship and then discuss how the papers published in this volume of Advances in Global Leadership relate to those patterns and themes. We then integrate all of the recommendations for future research that appeared in the papers published in this volume and then offer our recommendations for future research in the field as well. We hope our efforts will aid scholars – especially doctoral students – to isolate the gaps that exist in the field and to design and conduct research that will have a greater potential to be published in top-tier journals and to impact the field.

Cover of Advances in Global Leadership
DOI
10.1108/S1535-1203201710
Publication date
2017-07-21
Book series
Advances in Global Leadership
Editors
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
ISBN
978-1-78714-698-3
eISBN
978-1-78714-698-3
Book series ISSN
1535-1203