The Emerald Handbook of Luxury Management for Hospitality and Tourism

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(30 chapters)

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Part 1 Conceptualising Luxury

Abstract

Throughout history, the concept of luxury has had different emphases. It was scaling its existence in tourism, from the lifestyles of ancient kingdoms to the Roman empire's witnessing sightseeing trips, tourist attractions in townships to business tours and luxury hotels in Paris to the British phenomenon of ‘The Grand Tour’ and the ‘Golden Age of Travel’. The chapter also covers its spread across the small number of affluent societies and groups of wealthy consumers hailing from not only developed but developing economies in the early twentieth century.

Presently, the concept has become ‘mass’ as the Digital-First Millennial and Generation X, and also the affluent female market is all contributing to reshape the concept and the demand of luxury travel in the emerging scenario. Therefore, to understand it fully, it is imperative to review what has gone before and the influences of factors such as economic development, technological innovation and the consumption behaviour for luxury in different societies. Thus, the chapter is an attempt to understand the historical progression of luxury tourism for giving directions for future implications for the sustainable growth of this form of tourism across the globe and in India. The chapter concludes by noting the applied and social approaches in the development of luxury tourism, leaving many academic researchers and those in the tourism industry to resolve the real progression of luxury tourism and its development with the support of a cross-cultural perspective.

Abstract

This chapter sets out to explore consumer-centred experiential luxury from the perspective of a human body. We focus on the various practices related to a yoga retreat holiday experience in luxury hotel premises, such as encounters with hotel facilities, employees, nature and atmosphere besides yoga practice. Attention to bodily practices and affectivities on a yoga retreat holiday experience enables discussing intangible luxury beyond the traditional debate of luxury as related to product or brand features or experiential luxury focused only on the cognitive multisensory perceptions. The autoethnographic approach supports unwrapping the subtle affectual sensations building individual luxury in the experience setting. The data are gathered along with the first author's fieldwork during her three yoga retreat holidays in Thailand. The embodied investigation of tourist practices inducing luxury in the premises of a luxury hotel enriches the discussion of the co-creation between human bodies and the experience setting. It draws attention to the dynamic, situational and sensitive nature of luxury in the contemporary touristic experience of a yoga retreat holiday. It also advances the existing research on the body, practice and knowing by featuring the way luxury is emerging within the practice of yoga retreat holiday. By challenging the paradigm of luxury sensed only through our five external senses, our findings on the being, doing and moving body deepen the understanding of the co-creation and sensitiveness, affecting the subjective, transparent and embodied understanding of luxury experience.

Abstract

This chapter examines the notion that contemporary tourists prefer luxury experiences rather than luxury products by testing the opinions and attitudes of middle-class tourists as a critical target for global luxury tourism through the lens of experience-oriented accommodation. Notions from the study were used in conceptualising a spectrum to describe the shades of grey within luxury tourism. A Japanese temple lodging known as ‘shukubo’ in Koyasan, an experience-based accommodation, was used as a case to investigate the preferences of two groups of middle-class Thai tourists: non-pilgrims and pilgrims. The results, which revealed positive opinions and attitudes towards the programme, confirm that both groups were satisfied with the luxury tourism experience programme. However, non-pilgrims, described as psychocentric tourists (represented in black at the left end of the spectrum), tended to embed them with luxury materials, such as the accommodation's facilities and amenities. Conversely, pilgrims, identified as allocentric travellers (represented in white at the right end of the spectrum), were inclined to define ‘simplicity’ as a luxury. They were also interested in learning experiences at both ‘off-the-beaten-track’ and famous branded destinations. The differences found in such an example as described above conceptualised tourists' personalities regarding luxury tourism within three shades of grey: dark grey, grey and light grey, depending on the intensity of their interests in material concerns or learning experiences. Findings from this study are general; however, it presents an original concept developed from demographic and psychographic factors to broaden the understanding of luxury tourism, which is undergoing a paradigm shift.

Abstract

Luxury and communism are perceived to be ideologically incompatible values. Prior to the end of the Cold War, luxury tourism and socialist economies had an accommodating relationship and were rationalised at the national level for foreign exchange revenues, showcasing national development in some instances and finally promoting leisure and political education. However, contemporary scholarship on political ideology and luxury tourism is limited given changes in the political and tourism domain over the last two decades. The start of luxury travel and increasing private promotion in Vietnam comes at a time where the communist regime is hurriedly developing the economy at a breakneck speed. Key cities like Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City have become the forefront of luxury travel for Vietnam. Luxury malls, fine dining and five-star hotel resorts have sprung over the years in tandem with Doi Moi (economic restructuring). Tourism literature has seldom ventured into regime politics and luxury tourism. Using a historical approach, the chapter traces the preamble of luxury tourism in the age of Vietnam's modernity. A critical assessment of contemporary luxury tourism in Vietnam reveals a favourable relationship with socialist principles.

Abstract

The overall significance of tourism's role in the nation's holistic development is now a common phenomenon world over. That is why the Government of various countries are according top-most priority towards tourism development. The luxury tourism is that niche segment which is growing intense day by day and the craving of luxury traveller is uninfluenced by any economic turmoil or the crises. Tourism is now widely acknowledged as the strategic tool for economic diversification in the Sultanate of Oman. The Government is fully geared towards turning Oman into a prime luxury tourism destination by incorporating tourism in its vision 2040 strategy. The Government is actively tapping Oman's luxury tourism potential with improved tourism product development, increased projects funding, thoughtful marketing and brand promotion to reap benefits from tourism investments. Oman's unparalleled beauty, rich historic grandeur and authentic hospitality complement the desire of luxury travellers to seek unique quality and comfort, exclusivity and less ostentation. With the slogan ‘Beauty has an address’, the laudable effort of Oman has placed its tourism offering as an ideal upscale and luxury destination in the Middle East. The chapter explores the prospects of beautiful attractions and various services and facilities offered by Oman to qualify as a luxury destination. It also identifies the challenges faced by Oman in luxury tourism destination development.

Part 2 Managing and Marketing Luxury Experiences

Abstract

Luxury consumption in the Czech Republic and other post-socialist countries has a shorter history than in the developed Western countries. The historical development of these countries still reflects the differences in buying behaviour. The chapter focusses on luxury travellers' behaviour and consumption patterns in the Czech Republic. In the Czech Republic, where the concept of old luxury has prevailed, it is already possible to observe a gradual shift towards a new luxury travel model. This new luxury model is associated with a high level of comfort and privacy, exclusive location and first-class services and new elements such as travelling, authenticity and sustainability.

The chapter provides different perspectives on consumption patterns. It points to consumer behaviour in luxury travel in dependence on the selected sociodemographic variables and spatial determinants. It also reveals the luxury-driven travel motivation and preferences on a luxury holiday. The results show that Czech luxury travellers are different in comparison with the traditional European markets. The Czechs fall behind the European luxury travellers, especially regarding the financial possibilities. As far as the Czech luxury traveller profile is concerned, the category of baby boomers with tertiary education and regular income is the most dominant among Czech affluent clients. The satisfaction of the needs for relaxation and the exploration of new destinations are the primary motives for taking luxury holidays. Concerning the regional income inequality, disparities between the capital city of Prague and the rest of the country are observed.

Abstract

Many destinations are keen to be a part of the increasing and lucrative luxury tourism market. Before targeting luxury tourists in the marketing efforts, is it essential to understand the meaning of ‘luxury’ and what is considered exclusive? As an emerging luxury destination, Norway certainly offers many attributes that can satisfy the needs of luxury tourists. Marketing luxury provides, nevertheless, challenges for Norway as its main attraction is nature, which is fundamentally free and accessible to anyone. Thus, it is necessary to tailor-make unique nature experiences with luxurious products, resulting in exclusivity and once-in-a-lifetime experiences beyond the masses. Luxury tourists have also been advocated as more sustainable than mass tourists as addition to the issue of carrying capacity; many are also concerned with responsible tourism. Specialist travel agents play an important role in the marketing process as they have first-hand knowledge of luxury tourists as well as acting as guardians of information communicated in marketing. In addition to mainland Norway, the Svalbard islands in the Arctic region may be considered as truly unique and exclusive destinations. While sustainable development is a major concern in Norwegian tourism in general, it is even more vital in the Arctic regions. Therefore, marketing needs to provide a balanced picture of the attractions and attributes in order to become a luxury destination that is sustainable in the long run.

Abstract

To remain competitive in an ever-changing marketplace, many accommodation managers are constantly upgrading their portfolio of service offerings for guests. Luxury suites with butler service were created as an extra component of luxury to the accommodation model. This inclusion was a welcomed innovation for guests who were willing to pay top dollar for top-of-the-line services and the ultimate in exclusivity. Butlers act as the luxury service delivery mechanisms in accommodations, going above and beyond to meet and exceed guest expectations. This chapter makes a unique contribution to the compendium of knowledge on luxury hospitality and tourism by providing insights from the supply side of luxury accommodation brands in the Caribbean and Pacific regions. A comprehensive review of the literature on the topic coupled with semi-structured interviews were conducted in the Maldives, Jamaica, St. Barts, The Bahamas, St. Lucia, Antigua, Cayman Islands, Barbados and Mexico. With an expressed need to examine the operationalisation (Miller & Mills, 2012a, 2012b) and subjectivity constructs (Godey et al., 2012a, 2012b) on Luxury Management in Hospitality and Tourism, this chapter aims to provide an excellent addition to the discourse. It also aims to address a major gap in the literature as there is a lacuna of recent research on Luxury Management in Tourism in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) from two major tourism dependent regions of the world – the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Abstract

Luxury has received attention from tourism researchers as an important element of the gastronomic tourism experience. With recent research suggesting food and wine tourism being connected to luxury, it is important to explore how gastronomic tourism experiences are marketed to create such perceptions and feelings of luxury. This chapter aims to understand marketing strategies that support luxury gastronomic tourism experiences. In contrast to the definition of luxury as a performance or a value, this research conceptualises luxury as an affect which is sensed and felt in gastronomic tourism experiences. How this conceptualisation translates into marketing practice is explored for a particular gastronomic region. An in-depth analysis of the website of a destination marketing organisation in the Hunter Valley gastronomic region of Australia shows that the gastronomic tourism experience is marketed as bucolic luxury using marketing strategies of connection, congregation and repetition, all of which channel and maintain the affect of bucolic luxury. The chapter contributes to the literature on luxury marketing in the tourism context by identifying marketing strategies that can augment the affect of luxury for the gastronomy tourist.

Abstract

Delivering services that create memorable luxury accommodation experiences rely on frontline staff to engage guests on a sensory level rather than merely a functional one. This engagement includes cognitive, emotional, relational and behavioural. Hospitality and tourism industries are people-orientated – people are needed to serve people in order to create desired experiences – and it is very difficult to create satisfaction or to revisit intention in every interaction that takes place. It is this intangible characteristic of the industries, provisions and tangible cues that play an important part in enhancing the overall luxury accommodation experience. Guests are very clear as to what they expect from luxury accommodation experiences: they feel that they are paying for a service that should be personalised, and that staff should realise what they want and need. The human interaction component and the co-creation that occurs between staff and guests is an essential dimension of the industry. The influence of these interactions on guest experiences and the delivery of services will be explored in this chapter.

Abstract

The market for luxury products and services plays a significant role in the world economy. The luxury hotel market is a crucial segment within the global market for luxury products and services. Luxury hospitality recorded a 5% growth rate along with demand for luxury cruises recording the growth of 7%, the highest among all luxury segments. The remarkable performance of luxury products and services over a period is attributed to the laudable marketing communication strategies of luxury marketers. In this research, we aimed to analyse how a multi-brand hospitality firm differentiates its luxury brand with other luxury brands in the portfolio, using textual messages aimed to communicate the uniqueness of the brands in its official websites. The case study method and content analysis are adapted to achieve the research objective. The study results show that different luxury brands under the brand portfolio of Marriott International can communicate the differences through the textual contents. Most of the differentiation relies on brand-specific features, traditions, services, location of the hotel and metadata on the Internet, followed by branded differentiators. It may be concluded that Marriott has been successful to an extent in using text contents in the website to differentiate its luxury brands.

Abstract

Luxury branding, in the context of tangible luxury consumables, has received academic attention. But the notion remained inconclusive in the context of consumption of luxury intangibles. The travel setting provides an excellent backdrop to explore the complex cognitive process of assigning meaning to the relationship between travellers and luxury travel brands. The shifting image of luxury consumption from elitism to mass aspirational, too, needs to be studied for its transformative implications. The chapter focused on developing a brand relationship scale, namely, TraveLux, in the context of luxury travel consumption and tested its robustness to explain the shared sentiments and emotions of travellers, engaged in luxury travel, across social media. The chapter identifies a four construct instruments capturing the essence of immersive experience, ethnocultural acculturation, passion and excitement and self-congruence as a seedbed of luxury brand affinity for travellers. TraveLux was also found to capture the shared experience of travellers consuming luxury travel brands, thereby establishing a synch between the instrument constructs and manifested human cognition in real-life situations. The study expanded on the volume of literature pertaining to luxury branding in the context of product-oriented industry and addresses the existing void in understanding traveller–brand relationships in luxury travel contexts. The study implicates a theoretical change in branding concept in perceiving luxury brands as price-based exclusivity to a transformative cultural experience. Further extrapolations of the study could be made by incorporating subtle behavioural patterns of travellers in perceiving luxury and subsequent evocation and predisposition towards decision-making.

Part 3 Technology and Other Contemporary Facets in Luxury

Abstract

This chapter intends to give insights into the use of technologies such as virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and artificial intelligence (AI) in tourism and hospitality. Thus, the objectives are to: (1) give an overview about the meaning of luxury the use of technologies in tourism and hospitality, (2) provide examples about the use of such technologies (e.g., VR, AR, AI in practice) and (3) point out suggestions about further research in the interface of luxury and technologies in tourism and hospitality. The chapter is of interest to both academics and practitioners since it presents luxury, VR, AR and AI concepts, gives examples of technologies applications and points out critical areas for future research.

Abstract

New technologies represent an important challenge for all sectors across the world, becoming a relevant opportunity for the luxury hospitality industry as well. This study empirically investigates the effects of openness to change and status consumption orientation in influencing luxury hotel guests' perceived usefulness of voice assistants when integrated with their staying. Specifically, we shed light on the potential interplay between these two constructs in shaping guests' perceived usefulness of these devices. Finding suggests that openness to changes and status consumption represents two potentially alternative aspects that managers could leverage to encourage hotel guests' perceived usefulness and vocal assistant devices. This implies that openness to change on the part of luxury hotel guests may be a necessary but not sufficient condition for these devices to be accepted. Rather, luxury hotel managers should also consider the status consumption orientation of their guests.

Abstract

This study aims to determine whether the branded luxury guestroom amenities provided in five-star hotels of Delhi influence the guest's hotel purchase decisions. It also identified the amenities which are found to be most and least influential in affecting the guest's hotel selection and purchase behaviour. The study was conducted in the three upscale five-star hotels of Delhi. The selection of amenities and brands to be considered as luxury was based upon three focus group interviews with the room's division manager of the hotels. A structured questionnaire was drafted to identify the most and least useful hotel amenities among the respondents, influencing their hotel selection and purchase behaviours. Wi-Fi in the guestroom was found to be the most valuable amenity, with stationery items regarded as least valuable. It was also found that the guest's hotel selection and purchase decisions were significantly influenced when luxury branded amenities were placed in the guestroom. Guests were even found to pay extra when the hotel provided access to luxury branded amenities in the guestrooms. This is a novel attempt to find how the guests' hotel selection and purchase intentions are influenced by the placement of branded luxury amenities in guestrooms.

Abstract

The relationship between food and tourism has always been an increasingly important segment in the real worlds of hospitality, destination marketing and tourism development. However, only recently we have seen the acceptance of the growth in interest in gastronomic tourism as an academic field of study. Nowadays, there is a worldwide rise of concern for gastronomy and, specifically, for top gastronomy. The influence of gastronomy on tourism has provided new and exciting opportunities for major stakeholders in the tourism and travel industry.

This chapter focuses on the relation between Michelin-starred restaurants and luxury tourism in an attempt to understand the impact and influence of luxury restaurants in tourism. An evolutionary analysis of the literature and a Michelin-starred case study will be conducted with the aim of: (1) understanding Michelin star system and luxury gastronomy; (2) analyzing the potential link between top gastronomy and luxury gastronomy; and (3) listening to chefs' voices and perspectives on changes in consumer behaviour, perspectives and trends. Findings generated by this approach may help create innovative ways to address luxury tourism and hospitality.

Part 4 Sustaining Luxury

Abstract

This chapter aims to introduce luxury brand management strategies applied in the hospitality industry and illustrate how luxury hospitality business operators can create, communicate and sustainably manage luxury brands. This chapter introduces the definitions and dimensions of luxury brands, followed by an exploration of the concept and importance of luxury brand sustainability. This chapter then explores how to maintain long-term luxury hospitality brand sustainability by applying a luxury brand framework. This chapter uses a case study featuring the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts (FSHR) to understand how a luxury brand communicates and maintains its sustainability through its various dimensions through the process of brand creation, communication and management. The chapter ends by providing practical implications for existing luxury hospitality brand organisations in the arena of customer service.

Abstract

Recent decades have witnessed a rising concern regarding the prosperity of the environment and utilisation of resources. A sustainable approach is being promoted in all sectors. In the field of tourism, sustainable tourism is widely discussed among researchers and practitioners. On the other hand, luxury tourism is criticised for lavish resource utilisation to serve the few luxury tourists. There is a need to include sustainability in luxury tourism to benefit the environment, local communities, tourist destination and luxury tourists. However, sustainable luxury tourism is an emerging concept and needs more investigation. This chapter attempts to present the existing knowledge about sustainable luxury tourism by implementing a systematic literature review. Further, the opportunities and challenges associated with sustainable luxury tourism are being highlighted. This study has identified the factors that need to be considered to promote sustainable luxury tourism. Moreover, suggestions of the researchers are being presented to serve as guidelines. This study includes an example of the Diphlu river lodge, which has practised sustainable luxury tourism for many years. The viewpoint of luxury tourists are being understood by analysing the reviews of tourists from TripAdvisor using NVIVO-12 qualitative data analysis software. The combination of literature review and practical information provides insight into sustainable luxury tourism.

Abstract

Sustainable luxury has often been seen to offer both environmental sustainability and the possibility for innovative entrepreneurial development of natural and cultural heritage. The possibility and challenges of sustainable luxury tourism for Indigenous groups have been discussed by Poelina and Nordensvärd (2018) at some length by including a cultural governance perspective that brings culture and nature together. They stressed how protecting our shared human heritage and human culture can be aligned with a new wave of sustainable luxury tourism. To achieve this, we need to create links to both management and protection of landscapes and ecosystems as vital parts of heritage protection and social development. This chapter explores how and why we need to integrate social sustainability into sustainable luxury tourism, where we can foresee potential pitfalls and conceptualise nature-based and Indigenous tourism to empower local Indigenous communities and provide them with sustainable employment, economic development and community services. The sustainable tourism model provides brokerage necessary to strengthen their capacity for innovation, entrepreneurship and transformational change. This transformational change requires tourist visitors and non-Indigenous tourism operators to be open to a new experience with Indigenous guides and tourism operators to see, share and learn how to feel ‘Country’ (Poelina, 2016; Poelina & Nordensvärd, 2018). We will use Martuwarra (Fitzroy River) and its communities in Kimberley (Western Australia) as a case study to develop a sociocultural sustainable luxury tourism framework that includes governance, legal and management and social policy perspective.

Abstract

Luxury tourism is an emerging area of research and deserves consideration for its implications for tourism and hospitality management and policy development. This chapter reviews the phenomena of luxury tourism in the academic literature and in particular, its links to the concepts of high yield, sustainability and tourist experiences. The global hiatus caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has presented an opportunity for tourism policymakers and industry stakeholders to reconsider how luxury tourism can contribute to optimal economic, social and environmental outcomes with desired yield and sustainability aspirations. A renewed understanding of luxury tourism in terms of its production and consumption processes, as well as the associated value, emotion and narrative, is therefore of critical importance. The value of this chapter lies in synthesising a number of strands of inquiry across disparate bodies of literature to identify a research agenda. Areas that are proposed for further research include the conceptualisation of luxury tourism, the evolving nature of luxury experiences; value co-creation across all stages of luxury tourism; and the nexus between luxury tourism and destination image. Managerial implications of luxury tourism are also discussed, including the necessary conditions for cultivating luxury tourism; the need to measure the social and environmental impact of luxury tourism; and the important relationships between luxury tourism, innovation and market leadership.

Abstract

The world of luxury hospitality is predominately perceived in a positive format; however, what this chapter discusses is the negative side to the luxury hospitality. The chapter critically examines the hotels' role in breaches of human rights and their possible involvement in illegal practices such as human trafficking and modern slavery. It provides an overview of the problem, the key terms and the stages of hotel involvement in this procedure. It examines the underlying reasons for the status quo, including discretion and secrecy accompanying luxury service. It highlights the vulnerability of the luxury sector relating to repercussions in terms of reputation and loss of trust. The chapter further examines the concept of duty of care and the breaches of it in relation to hotel staff. Particularly, it examines the industry-wide problem of alcohol and drug abuse among employees and the possible reasons behind it, followed by possible best practice solutions.

Part 5 Luxury in a Post-Pandemic World

Abstract

This chapter assesses how luxury travel imaginaries were modified in the aftermath of the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. Drawing on long-term fieldwork among travel influencers, the chapter presents their response strategies to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on an analysis of evidence from participant observation in tourist sites, network visualisations, in-depth interviews and platform profiles, I trace the transformations luxury travel imaginaries have undergone since the beginning of 2020. Before this global crisis, travel influencers became new puissant players in the highly globalised tourism industry as they regularly received assignments from tourism boards and hotels. Although brand sponsorship was considered a substantial source of revenue for travel influencers, their collaborations in travel destinations and the monetisation of travel content on YouTube were further assets to secure a livelihood. The coronavirus outbreak, however, turned their life-worlds upside down. This ethnographic investigation identified three main responses of travel influencers to the current long-term crisis of tourism: (1) diversification of content creation and orientation towards other influencer genres, (2) support for local tourism organisations and online promotion of staycations and (3), finally, travel to tourist sites for circulating online content on safe travel standards. Digital platforms became a major arena where the future of tourism has been re-negotiated in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. The in-depth investigation suggests that travel influencers were in a position to create new powerful representations of luxury as safe travel since they acquired the skills to establish stable storyworlds for their travel experiences, which attracted the attention of large platform audiences.

Abstract

The growth of luxury tourism has been brought to a grinding halt due to the COVID-19 pandemic affecting most parts of the world since early 2020. Although the time for recovery of hospitality and tourism industries is still unclear, experience from the SARS outbreak in 2003 showed that the bounce back from consumers could be fast. The group of most affluent consumers, mostly known as HNWIs (high net worth individuals), will resume their original consumption behaviour much sooner than the rest of the market; these affluent consumers are the main target market of luxury hospitality and tourism industries.

This chapter presents different types of luxury tourism, luxury lifestyle, luxury tourists' decision-making and luxury hospitality products. The luxury food and beverage business in Singapore is presented to illustrate the commercial environment during the pandemic.

Abstract

This chapter aims to establish the relation of luxury tourism to sustainability and questions whether tourism in its current form is not itself a luxury. By analysing consumer travel motivation and demands of luxury tourism, we examine the impact of these perceptions and ask whether Anthropocene tourism does not by definition have a negative impact on the environment. A new concept of luxury has developed clearly illustrated by a move from Maslow’s (1943) ‘esteem’ to the top tier of ‘self-actualisation’ as reflected in Pearce and Lee (2005) Travel Career Ladder and top tier of personal fulfilment. This move has led to a decline in physical trophy collection, but rather the desire for luxury is taking on a new definition more about a perception of environmental connection, personal fulfilment and finding a brand or experience that shares similar values to the consumer. The commodification of nature has led to new forms of tourism concentrating on connecting to places, people and causes. An analysis of tourism growth impact in the Global North and South, and neo-colonisation in tourism highlights the contradictions within sustainable goals and tourism. It is increasingly difficult to categorise tourism as sustainable or unsustainable, luxury or non-luxury, but rather this chapter questions whether tourism itself has become an unsustainable pandemic and an indefensible luxury.

Abstract

As the world slowly emerges from the pandemic of the newly discovered COVID-19 virus, luxury hospitality providers are re-opening their businesses in a completely new reality. While they ensure that their unique brand identity and image are appropriately communicated to the customers, they must also strictly adhere to the hygiene and cleanliness standards imposed on businesses by local authorities. As a result, luxury hotels, restaurants, spas and resorts find themselves in a situation where they must adjust, if not re-design, experiences offered to their customers.

This chapter looks at the concept of experiences and examines key elements of creating authentic experiences. It discusses the role of embedding the culture of adaptability to change to ensure the business's longevity and resilience to crises. Finally, it deconstructs some of the industry's best practices to showcase the most creative and resourceful approaches to embracing the new reality and offering authentic experiences to discerning guests.

The chapter is concluded by an attempt to look into future customer expectations and businesses' opportunities to re-open and provide updated services to customers by actually embedding strategic foresight in both short- and long-term planning to build genuine resilience to future crises.

Abstract

This chapter explores in-depth the particularities of the luxury travel industry during the coronavirus pandemic. The chapter begins with a literature review on the concept of the experience referred to as luxury travel, followed by a brief overview of the measures adopted globally in the tourism sector for the prevention of COVID-19. Due to the impact of the crisis, high-net-worth individuals (HNWIs) have changed their motivations, preferences and behaviour. To meet the new demands prompted by the pandemic, the luxury travel industry has adopted a wide range of strategies that have been classified into three groups: (1) reducing new moments of friction; (2) experiencing protection and (3) building new memorable experiences. A selection of examples from the luxury travel industry illustrates each category. The chapter ends with a case study that describes the strategy adopted by Fiji to respond to the pandemic. The manner in which Fiji has tackled the pandemic may be inspiring for other tourism-dependent destinations as Fiji has been able to protect the health and safety of the inhabitants of its islands while preserving the local economy, which relies on tourism.

Index

Pages 539-550
Content available
Cover of The Emerald Handbook of Luxury Management for Hospitality and Tourism
DOI
10.1108/9781839829000
Publication date
2022-01-25
Editors
ISBN
978-1-83982-901-7
eISBN
978-1-83982-900-0