Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management

Cover of Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
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Synopsis

Table of contents

(19 chapters)

Prelims

Pages i-xxii
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Introduction

Pages 1-7
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Part I: Strategy in Contemporary Managerial Work Contains a Collection of Chapters that Deal with Defining Issues of Managerial Work in Terms of Strategy

Abstract

This qualitative research articulates the perspective that educational institution directors have on the meaning of management action and the need for training in this area. Significant research findings include the importance of training in three specific aspects: technical knowledge, virtues, and managerial competencies. Study participants emphasized that experience alone is insufficient to run a school, which is an important job not only for educating students, but also for the impact it has on the entire educational community (i.e., managers, administrative and service staff, teachers, and parents).

Abstract

Organizations are typically diverse, and differences among team members may present challenges. Considering the values of humanism presents an opportunity for organizational leaders to address concerns related to diversity. Effective and respectable leadership involves innovation and it is within this context that hospitality offers a new approach. Hospitality has the potential to provide a conducive and suitable environment for developing members’ talents and potential to contribute to the organization. This chapter aims to analyze the role of hospitality in the management of modern-day organizations. Hospitality is considered an essential and important factor that guarantees an atmosphere of harmony. It is a binding force that supports the complexities of managerial work.

Abstract

Senior managers seek to align managerial endeavors with the organization’s objectives. Traditionally, alignment has focused on monitoring and rewarding the achievement of assigned targets. However, there is evidence to suggest that organizations may also seek to align managerial “values” with those of the organization. These attempts to influence managerial mindsets through management control systems raise non-trivial questions regarding the systems involved, the reasons behind them, and the possible consequences of such attempts. These questions form the basis of this research, and this chapter reports on two case studies of Mexican organizations that claim to have a values-based philosophy. This study contributes to the management literature by presenting empirical evidence related to certain philosophical ideas on the development of human potential and senior managers’ attempts to influence their employees’ will. In detailing the implementation process of two specific value systems, this chapter fills a gap identified in the management control literature.

Abstract

Burnout syndrome is characterized by exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy. Considered a work–stress-related condition, burnout first described professional activities that provide a direct service to people, such as the health and teaching professions. Recent scholarship, however, points to the existence of burnout in any kind of work and at any level of the organization. Some have noted a high prevalence of burnout in the general population, and especially increased prevalence among healthcare professionals. This chapter thus aims to analyze burnout syndrome, including its detection and prevention in organizations. It will proceed by reviewing classic and recent scientific literature on burnout, and its impact on the individual and the organization. It also evaluates organizational interventions meant to prevent burnout and help employees, as well as assess some coping strategies employees can take up to develop a healthier relationship with their jobs.

Abstract

This chapter introduces the negotiagram as a tool that contributes to the study of the negotiation process. The negotiagram is a construct that facilitates an understanding of interactions between negotiators and their temporal context. Given that the negotiation process can be seen as a system, system dynamics (SD) are used to explore the interactions and complexities in the proposed construct, especially when it comes to circumstances with a high degree of uncertainty, such as an economic crisis or disruptive innovation in the industry. The results suggest that the causal configurations that SD establish lead to non-linear relationships and feedback loops that direct behavior within negotiation, an understanding that further leads stakeholders to a holistic vision and the opportunity to change, manage, and control a negotiation as a system.

Abstract

Family business firms (FBFs) constantly struggle with the challenge of successfully reaching and surviving beyond the third generation. Narrative or storytelling is frequently used in business to transmit knowledge, achieve goals, create and maintain a connection with stakeholders, and achieve sustained growth. Most FBFs consciously or unconsciously use narrative and possess their own discourse, which is unique to every family and family business and which may aid FBFs in achieving continuity. FBFs must have an adequate atmosphere of collaboration and cooperation so that group members can transform acquired tacit knowledge through storytelling into explicit action. FBFs should be prepared to help collaborators and other stakeholders build competencies since tacit knowledge transfer, through narrative, can aid in the solving of problems, enhance innovativeness, and improve strategic decision-making. Therefore, narrative may well aid FBFs in fulfilling their ultimate goal of continuity. The purpose of this chapter is to evaluate the potential influence of narrative on FBFs’ continuity and prevention of their precipitous expiration. This chapter contributes to previous literature that sheds light on the narrative implications of FBFs, and depicts FBFs’ narratives and the dynamics of their business objectives, as well as touches on the heterogeneous nature of each family business’ storyline. There are various advantages to FBFs’ storytelling; perhaps the most noteworthy is the achievement of sustained business growth and continuity.

Part II: Power and Organizational Management is a Selection of Chapters that Address Pertinent Theoretical Constructs About Power and Management in Organizations

Abstract

Redefining the word “power” within the realm of corporate social responsibility, with support from individuals, families, and universities, supposes radical social change. Therein, firms aim to exercise leadership and yet are faced with unanswered questions from political, sociological, legal, and economic institutions. As an agent of change the most practical and effective approach for a company is innovation that imitates nature and utilizes a combination of technological and humanistic knowledge. Workers from multiple disciplines form the theoretical and methodological foundations on which the company can empower itself.

Abstract

In implementing strategies to achieve ambitious goals, managers use tools such as performance measurement systems (PMS) for their proven ability to motivate and drive employees’ behaviors. However, many strategies fail during implementation, partly because managers pay insufficient attention to PMS design, tending to devote too little attention to characteristics of the metrics they use to evaluate and provide feedback on their subordinates’ performance. This chapter discusses the management control literature on metrics, the psychology behind the behavioral effects of measurements, typical managerial errors in choosing performance metrics, and previous attempts to define characteristics of good measurements. It suggests that good measurements should exhibit a set of characteristics associated with a novel and easily remembered acronym, STORY, and tests this typology by analyzing empirical data gathered on 1,159 metrics from 293 survey respondents, including characteristics of the people measured (e.g., age, position, and functional department) and the organizations employing them (e.g., firm size, industry, scope, and type of organization).

Abstract

This chapter addresses the stage at which entrepreneurs figure out that they have reached their level of incompetence (Peter & Hull, 1969) and how they might overcome it. Recommendations are made to aid entrepreneurs realize when this key moment has arrived, as well as to lay out an action plan to help them either become a professional Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or move aside and let a professional CEO run their company. Based on a state of the art review, this chapter identifies the most valued personality traits and skills, as well as leadership styles, for both entrepreneurs and professional CEOs. Those attributes are summarized as ideal job descriptions to help CEOs detect gaps between their current personality profile and the one that best meets company needs at each stage of the business’ lifecycle.

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Abstract

The phenomenon of crisis – of all kinds and at all levels – provides abundant material for study in disciplines centered on the human being. The twentieth century’s complex landscape provides valuable elements for developing a “morphology of crisis,” where crises of all types can be identified, including personal, family, social, economic, ethical, scientific, philosophical, and historical ones. The broad range of crises that exists today requires further study to better understand the concept, and Reinhart Koselleck offered perhaps the most significant interpretative keys for such a task. In his work, Critique and Crisis (1954), Koselleck developed a particularly lucid theory of crisis. His vast historical erudition, steeped in a philosophical quest, offers contemporary readers an approach to the issue of crisis, elucidating its most relevant requirements and challenges.

This chapter studies the historical use of the word crisis, aiming to better understand both the term and whether or not it preserves the concept’s invariable foundation and transversal elements, namely the experience of time as a turning point between the past and future, the need for judgment to guide the development of a particular situation, and a decision that gives shape to a new state of affairs.

This analysis is not just limited to understanding Koselleck’s account of the crisis concept; it also tests and addresses its internal structure. The description of the diversity of crisis phenomena at the beginning supports assessment of the illuminating power of Koselleck’s concept of crisis.

Part III: Corporate Social Responsibility Aspects in Organizational Management Incorporates a Collection of Detailed Chapters that Focus on CSR, as well as on the Ethical and Human Aspects That Play an Increasingly Important Role in Modern Organizations

Abstract

This chapter proposes a protocol based on blockchain technology applied to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The first part discusses the characteristics associated with CSR actions and the main difficulties its development faces, such as transparency, security, fault tolerance, among others. Subsequently, the authors describe the characteristics and concepts related to blockchain-based developments to later describe our framework for the control and development of CSR actions based on blockchain. Herein, the authors also describe how to publicly and privately identify the participating elements of CSR and the operations and resources necessary for the implementation and operation of the proposed protocol.

Abstract

At present, Higher Education Institutions around the world are developing and implementing university social responsibility(USR) as part of their strategy. They do so because they seek to assure the quality of higher education systems, as well as to positively impact their surrounding environment. This chapter aims to analyze the university’s role in the process of building social responsibility in line with efforts to adequately fulfill its three missions of teaching, research, and linking with society. The case study herein refers to the Universidad Panamericana (UP), a private university in Mexico with humanistic and Christian roots, which recently celebrated its 50th year. The analysis demonstrates the UP’s significant efforts to build a social responsibility system and its achievement of significant social impact through programs that support the community, healthcare, and people with disabilities. However, management of USR should be done at an institutional level and across the board.

Abstract

Mexico currently faces serious social scarcities and businesses are under pressure. The alternative lies in improving company performance through education. It is important to educate future entrepreneurs and managers within a corporate social responsibility (CSR) framework and expose them to the stakeholder theory. This chapter argues that educating socially responsible management students is the touchstone strategy for addressing the big challenges that twenty first century organizations face. This chapter first defines the CSR concept, relating it to organizations’ role in fulfilling society’s expectations, demands, and requirements. Second, it sets forth why CSR is a strategic tool for management and a moral obligation for companies. Finally, it argues for the importance of including CSR and the stakeholder theory in the curriculum of all management faculties and programs.

Abstract

This chapter is an exploratory study of business ethics as it relates to family firms; it primarily aims to explore virtue ethics as an alternative proposal for the ethical concerns that family firms face in their management, thus overcoming the limitations of relevant business ethics approaches and integrating them into an overarching paradigm. Ethics can be classified into three main streams: (1) deontology, (2) utilitarianism, and (3) virtue ethics. The former two approaches have been widely used in the realm of business and family firms for many years and they tend to instrumentalize ethics for business purposes. Yet, they are mostly powerless to explain and promote the ethical concerns surrounding the family firm’s culture. Virtue ethics regained philosophical interest in the second half of the twentieth century, shifting the focus of morality from “the right thing to do” to the “best way to live.” By bringing together two consolidated research fields, family firms and virtue ethics, this chapter contributes a rich perspective to current research in both fields and opens up new ways of answering many of the cultural questions that family firms bring to the table.

Abstract

Man’s action at work is not a particular issue, nor does it separate him from his being or family life, but rather work helps man to develop and unifies each of his constitutive elements. Thus, the company must see man as a whole, as an end and not as a means, to achieve what the company must seek for society, that is, the common good, and, with it, the man’s objective good. This chapter aims to demonstrate a thorough, structured way of knowing, understanding and potentiating human faculties, virtues and passions in favor of a kind of leadership that focuses more on the human person. It is framed by business’s trend of social responsibility and its current impact. In this way, social responsibility takes on a different direction and inspires workers and companies’ real commitment to the good of society.

Abstract

This chapter aims to reflect upon the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human rights. We argue that although CSR is a good attempt to propose better practices for managerial decisions, a human rights perspective enriches this vision. Therefore, the authors will define the meaning of a human rights perspective for business activities and, specifically, for CSR. The authors apply the idea of res extra commercium to human rights and CSR. As a first step, both factors need to be identified as moral absolutes. Essentially, businesses should start by identifying areas of human activity that are off limits.

Index

Pages 329-339
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Cover of Strategy, Power and CSR: Practices and Challenges in Organizational Management
DOI
10.1108/9781838679736
Publication date
2020-07-24
Editors
ISBN
978-1-83867-973-6
eISBN
978-1-83867-973-6