Institute of food science and technology trust fund

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Article publication date: 28 March 2008

Citation

(2008), "Institute of food science and technology trust fund", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 38 No. 2. https://doi.org/10.1108/nfs.2008.01738bab.018

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Institute of food science and technology trust fund

Article Type: Food facts From: Nutrition

Campylobacters occur widely as part of the intestinal flora of many warm-blooded animals and birds, particularly chickens and turkeys, and can be carried in animals that are used for food production and in domestic pets. In addition, they also occur in untreated water and raw milk. Evidence indicates that the most important risk factors for food-borne infection are consumption of undercooked poultry (particularly chicken), and other meat, unpasteurised or inadequately pasteurised milk and food that has been cross-contaminated. Symptoms of infection in humans consist of diarrhoea, sometimes with bloodstained stools, which may last from two to ten days. The illness is usually self-limiting, but can be severe. Campylobacters do not grow in food at temperatures below 30OC so control measures should focus on the prevention of contamination and cross-contamination. Thus, experts around the world recognise that the application of HACCP to production, processing and distribution of poultry and other food products is important. Consumers should be aware of the risk associated with consuming raw or undercooked food of animal origin. This risk can be avoided by consuming only thoroughly cooked meat/poultry, and only pasteurised milk; by obtaining water from approved sources; and by good hygiene in the kitchen. There is a low risk of human infection from close contact with companion dogs or cats, particularly if they suffer from diarrhoea. Information can be found at: www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/acmsfcampylobacter.pdf