Books. Vocational Studies, Lifelong Learning and Social Values: Investigating Education, Training and NVQs under the New Deal

Education + Training

ISSN: 0040-0912

Article publication date: 1 March 2000

Keywords

Citation

(2000), "Books. Vocational Studies, Lifelong Learning and Social Values: Investigating Education, Training and NVQs under the New Deal", Education + Training, Vol. 42 No. 2. https://doi.org/10.1108/et.2000.00442bad.001

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited


Books. Vocational Studies, Lifelong Learning and Social Values: Investigating Education, Training and NVQs under the New Deal

Books

Vocational Studies, Lifelong Learning and Social Values: Investigating Education, Training and NVQs under the New Deal

Terry HylandAshgate1999ISBN: 1840148470£39.95

Keywords: Vocational training, National vocational qualifications, Unemployment, UK

Lifelong learning is the slogan with which the Labour Government has chosen to publicize and popularize its values and policies for post-16 education and training. Vocational Studies, Lifelong Learning and Social Values: Investigating Education, Training and NVQs under the New Deal subjects New Labour policy - particularly developments surrounding the University for Industry and the New Deal - to scrutiny and offers a number of recommendations designed to upgrade vocational education and training.

The author argues that, if Britain is to create a high-status and high-quality vocational education and training system comparable to those of its European competitors, it must move towards a unified curriculum in the post-school sector, bringing with it the abolition of the present three-track model of NVQs, GNVQs and GCSEs/A levels.

More significantly, the author argues that all vocational training - both work-based and college-based - needs to be underpinned by a common core of knowledge and understanding and, crucially, be located within a values framework which gives due attention to social justice and community interests rather than simplistic and utilitarian economic objectives and employability skills.

Moreover, the aesthetic and moral dimensions of vocational studies are not optional extras, but essential if vocational training is to be enhanced in order to satisfy current lifelong-learning criteria.

The book constitutes one of the first philosophical and policy critiques of New Labour's vocational education and training policies. It will be of interest to lecturers, tutors, instructors and students working in post-compulsory education and training, as well as to industrialists.